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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
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WORLD
April 10, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - South African athlete Oscar Pistorius rambled and at times contradicted himself under cross-examination Wednesday during his trial for the shooting death of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. "My memory is not very good at the moment," Pistorius said during testimony at Pretoria's High Court. "I'm under a lot of pressure sitting here. I'm defending for my life. " Pistorius, who has pleaded not guilty to murder and said he mistakenly shot Steenkamp at his house last year thinking she was an intruder, acknowledged that he was weighing every implication as he responded to questions from prosecutor Gerrie Nel. "But Reeva doesn't have a life anymore, because of what you did," Nel said to Pistorius.
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NEWS
November 15, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a popular teacher, known for working past midnight on school projects and being a compassionate ally to her students. He was one of the special ones: a sixth-grader with whom she had recognized a kindred spirit when he entered her class, talented and intense.
WORLD
April 10, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - The prosecutor in the murder trial of South African Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius accused him of repeatedly lying to the court and offering versions of events so improbable that "nobody would think it is reasonably or possibly true. " Pistorius, on trial in Pretoria's high court on a charge that he murdered his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, denied Thursday that he pulled the trigger of a gun that went off in his hand in a crowded upscale South African restaurant in early 2013, a contention the prosecution described as impossible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Investigators served a search warrant Monday night on the Lakewood home of Bruce Koklich, who faces a second trial next month on charges that he murdered his wife, the daughter of the late state Sen. Paul Carpenter. Koklich, 44, who is free on $1-million bail, allowed sheriff's homicide and crime-scene investigators inside the home on Fairway Drive, Lt. Ray Peavy said. They planned to look for potential evidence in the case, Peavy said, but he did not specify what.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999
Oxymoron: former prosecutors. ORV PEASE Burbank
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Christopher Goffard
Police have arrested an 41-year-old Anaheim woman on suspicion of operating a brothel in one the city's motels. Ramona Judith Mora Garcia is accused of enlisting a 33-year-old woman and a 38-year-old woman as prostitutes in late 2013 and early 2014. The Anaheim Police Department contacted her through a sexually suggestive ad Garcia had placed in a magazine, according to the Orange County district attorney's office. Authorities said Garcia would place such ads, arrange for customers to meet with the two women for sex and then demand half the money they were paid.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Federal prosecutors in Los Angeles dismissed criminal charges against nine people in a $30-million stock-manipulation case after concluding that misstatements in obtaining court approval for key wiretap recordings made the evidence unusable at trial. The dismissals were an embarrassing setback for prosecutors who were bursting with pride last year when they announced the indictments, the result of a three-year investigation. U.S. Atty. Andre Birotte Jr. said investigators had relied heavily on wiretap evidence, which is rarely used in white-collar cases.
NATIONAL
November 5, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
An Army brigadier general stands accused of sexual misconduct with subordinates and a civilian, of threatening one woman's career and her life, and of responding "I'm a general, I'll do whatever the [expletive] I want” when challenged about making demeaning comments about women, military prosecutors said Monday. The curtain was raised in the case against Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Allen Sinclair during a special preliminary hearing at Ft. Bragg, N.C., that will decide whether he should face a court-martial.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Congressional criticism is mounting against U.S. prosecutors for pursuing prison time for a popular hacker in a case that's morphed into a posthumous cause celebre. Aaron Swartz, 26, a cofounder of Reddit and an open-Internet advocate, committed suicide in New York on Jan. 11 as a trial loomed involving charges that he had allegedly illegally hacked into a network at MIT to download scholarly articles hidden behind an expensive subscription paywall. He had previously said the knowledge belonged to the world.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson
For 16 months, Bay Area rapper Deandre Mitchell - better known as Laz Tha Boy - has been sitting in a jail cell faced with a decision no artist should have to make: whether to defend his innocence at trial, knowing his music likely will be used as evidence against him, or take a plea bargain and admit to crimes he maintains he did not commit. Mitchell's case dates to October 2012, when he was indicted for his alleged role in two gang-related shootings that occurred that year. Prosecutors didn't present a single arrest or conviction to establish Mitchell's association with a criminal gang, and with conflicting eyewitness testimony - and no physical evidence connecting him to the shootings, according to defense attorney John Hamasaki - prosecutors elected to introduce something else: Mitchell's violent gangsta rap videos and lyrics, which were presented to the grand jury as evidence of his criminal behavior.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Mexican federal authorities have detained the interior minister of Michoacan state after determining that he has "possible contacts with criminal organizations," according to a statement released by prosecutors Saturday night. The aggressive action against Interior Minister Jesus Reyna, is a sign that the federal government, which has struggled for months to control the drug-plagued state, is considering the possibility that the influence of narcotics trafficking has spread nearly to the pinnacle of state government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Maura Dolan, Patrick McGreevy and Paige St. John
SAN FRANCISCO - For more than two decades, Leland Yee climbed the political ladder in San Francisco. A child psychologist turned politician, Yee straddled opposing camps in the city's bare-knuckled political fights, appealing to both right and left and catering to constituents with a strong, attentive staff. Elegant in appearance and charming in manner, he courted financial contributors and built a reputation as a canny pol with an enviable knack of identifying the high-profile issue of the day and then weighing in before a thicket of cameras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
Andre Birotte Jr., the chief federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, has been nominated by President Obama to serve as a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, the White House announced Thursday. Birotte, who has served as the U.S. attorney overseeing the nation's second-largest office since 2010, is a former Los Angeles County deputy public defender who also acted as the Los Angeles Police Department's inspector general for six years. As L.A.'s top federal prosecutor, he reinstated a public corruption and civil rights unit disbanded by his predecessor and oversaw high-profile investigations into the L.A. County jails and into state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Robert L. Brosio, a retired federal prosecutor who supervised high-profile cases that included those against bank swindler Charles Keating Jr. and Los Angeles police officers who were involved in the beating of Rodney King, has died. He was 77. Brosio, who for 28 years led the criminal division of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, had a massive pulmonary embolism in February, his daughter Serena Brosio said. He died Friday at a Pasadena hospital. While he seldom argued cases in court himself, Brosio was in charge of more than 100 prosecutors and set a standard of "ramrod integrity," said Nora Manella, an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Federal prosecutors in Los Angeles dismissed criminal charges against nine people in a $30-million stock-manipulation case after concluding that misstatements in obtaining court approval for key wiretap recordings made the evidence unusable at trial. The dismissals were an embarrassing setback for prosecutors who were bursting with pride last year when they announced the indictments, the result of a three-year investigation. U.S. Atty. Andre Birotte Jr. said investigators had relied heavily on wiretap evidence, which is rarely used in white-collar cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lawrence E. Walsh, a former federal judge and Wall Street lawyer who spent a frustrating seven years as the independent counsel investigating misconduct by Reagan administration officials in the Iran-Contra affair, died Wednesday at his home in Oklahoma City after a short illness, his family said. He was 102. Walsh undertook the controversial job when he was 75 and semi-retired from a career that began in the mid-1930s, when he prosecuted racketeering in New York City. The Republican later was appointed to the federal bench, served as president of the American Bar Assn., and was No. 2 in President Eisenhower's Justice Department before spending two decades with the powerful law firm of Davis, Polk & Wardwell.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Federal prosecutors intend to enter autopsy photos of the three Boston Marathon victims into evidence, but they want bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to see only the pictures that will be used in his trial. On Monday, prosecutors asked a federal judge in Boston to grant a protective order that would bar Tsarnaev, 20, from looking at any autopsy photos of bombing victims Krystle Campbell, Martin Richard and Lingzi Lu unless the images are entered into the court record. Tsarnaev is eligible for the death penalty if he is convicted in the April 15 attack, which killed three people and wounded more than 260. He has pleaded not guilty to 30 federal charges, including the use of a weapon of mass destruction.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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