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Protease Inhibitors

NEWS
January 19, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles times
While the overall stroke rate in the United States has declined in the last decade, the rate among people infected with the AIDS virus has climbed sharply, researchers reported Wednesday. Although the reason for the increase is not clear, many experts suspect that it is related to the use of protease inhibitors to control replication of the virus. While the drugs, as part of cocktails of antiretroviral medications, have proved remarkably effective in controlling the virus and prolonging patients' lives, they have also interfered with the patients' lipid metabolism, increasing the levels of cholesterol and lipids in patients' blood and altering the distribution of fats in their bodies.
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NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved marketing of the Merck drug boceprevir, the first new drug for hepatitis C in 20 years. The agency is still considering approval of a similar drug, telaprevir, and is expected to approve it soon as well. Both drugs are members of a new class of hepatitis drugs called protease inhibitors, which block a key enzyme required by the virus to replicate. They are expected to convert hepatitis C from a debilitating disease into a manageable condition for the majority of people infected with the virus.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In some of the strongest evidence thus far that a new generation of AIDS drugs can inhibit the human immunodeficiency virus, scientists reported Monday that HIV became virtually undetectable in most patients six months after starting treatment with one of the new drugs in combination with two standard ones. "For the first time we may be close to achieving almost total suppression of the AIDS virus in most patients," said Dr.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
For the first time since the AIDS epidemic began sweeping across America and the world, physicians think they may have the weapons to place them on an equal footing with the deadly virus. While cautious about using the word "cure," researchers gathering Sunday in Vancouver for the 11th International Conference on AIDS are optimistic that they can begin to bring the epidemic under control.
HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Melissa Healy and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Thirty years ago Sunday, a brief report in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report described cases of a rare form of pneumonia called Pneumocystis carinii in five young Los Angeles men, "all active homosexuals. " The cases were noteworthy because the men had previously been healthy, though their particular pneumonia had only been seen in people with severely depressed immune systems. Within a month, a second report had identified 54 young gay men with a rare cancer known as Kaposi's sarcoma, another disease that had been almost unknown in young men. And by the following summer, the mysterious disease underlying these reports had a name: acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS.
OPINION
June 5, 2004
Re "Activists Put Drug Research on Chopping Block," Commentary, June 1: I was described by James Glassman and Nick Schulz as a "left-wing activist" who is engaged in a "relentless campaign against technological innovation" spreading "Luddite nonsense that kills people." Allow me to respond. What has them riled up is Essential Inventions' petition asking the Bush administration to allow generic drug companies to use six government-funded patents relating to the AIDS drug ritonavir, sold now under the trade name Norvir.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials are expected to recommend today that most HIV-infected patients be treated early and aggressively with potent triple-drug combinations that include a protease inhibitor, a regimen that is not always currently practiced among clinicians nationwide.
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Despite the effectiveness of powerful new drug combinations for suppressing infections of the AIDS virus, researchers are reluctantly concluding that the treatments may never be able to eradicate the human immunodeficiency virus from the body. Unless unexpected new treatments are discovered, experts say, those infected with the virus will most likely have to continue taking the expensive drug combinations for the rest of their lives.
NEWS
November 5, 1996 | CLIFFORD ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent Monday night at the Ron Stone HIV Center in West Hollywood, Michael Monroe is leading a class in rebirthing, sponsored by Being Alive, a support agency run by and for people with the virus. "Rebirthing" is a breathing technique that is said to help dislodge emotional blocks and ease coping with stress and fears--one of the myriad alternative therapies the HIV community assimilated during the decade when no medication worked.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1997 | MARY CAMPBELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Composer Jerry Herman, whose Broadway hits number "Hello, Dolly!," "Mame" and "La Cage aux Folles," is on a roll. His autobiography recently was published and a revue with 45 of his songs is running in San Francisco. He recently composed the score for his first TV musical, "Mrs. Santa Claus," and wrote his first children's song, for an upcoming movie about Barney, the purple dinosaur. What he wants next is a subject to turn into another Broadway musical.
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