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Protectionism Trade

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BUSINESS
March 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
The world trade organization accused the United States on Thursday of using protectionist measures to curb cheap imports. The United States also faced a barrage of criticism from individual members of the 103-nation General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade during a two-day review of Washington's trade practices. U.S. Ambassador Rufus H. Yerxa said the review, based on a new GATT study, helped clear the air. "We're willing to take our lumps. We can dish it out, but we can take it."
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2009 | David Pierson
Fearing a deepening downturn, China's government is using its muscle to prop up the nation's economy. It's encouraging banks to lend. It's investing billions in infrastructure. It's stockpiling key raw materials. And it's placing restrictions on purchases of foreign goods. Those measures have helped keep China growing faster than any other major country. Its economy is projected to expand by 7.2% this year, according to a recent World Bank estimate.
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NEWS
May 22, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As front-page newspaper reports here Friday warned that Washington will soon insist that Japan take Draconian measures to cut its trade surplus, this country released a new study of its own, saying that undue U.S. emphasis on trade balances could usher in a new era of protectionism.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Bush administration Monday criticized China's record on opening its markets and said the U.S. would not hesitate to seek economic sanctions if that record did not improve. Calling China's performance "decidedly mixed," U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab released a 100-page report that accused China of failing to live up to commitments it made five years ago, when it joined the World Trade Organization.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Staff Writer
For hard-driving Rep. Richard A. Gephardt, House approval Wednesday of his controversial amendment toughening U.S. trade policy means attainment of a legislative goal that the Missouri Democrat has been striving toward for months. Even more important for White House aspirant Gephardt, the House action moved him a significant rung up the ladder in his climb toward a more difficult objective--capturing his party's 1988 nomination.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The entertainment industry, convinced that President-elect Bill Clinton will do more to advance its interests overseas than the outgoing Bush Administration, is urging White House officials to abandon efforts to complete a new world trade accord by Jan. 20. Hollywood executives consider a proposed global trade agreement being negotiated in Geneva to be fatally flawed because it allows countries to restrict imports of American-made films and television programs.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A growing number of Asian nations are considering forming an Asia Pacific trade bloc to counter what they fear is increasing protectionism from trade zones being created or proposed by the European Community and the governments of North America. The scheme--by promoting trade between many Asian nations that until now have not been close trading partners--is in some ways more ambitious than the plan that will create a single economic European Community in 1992, analysts say.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pardon the Ecuadoreans for being a little dubious about "free trade." An international banana war triggered by the European Union has devastated plantations clustered around this coastal city. The effect has been the same in Panama, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. It has also rippled through the boardroom at Dole Food Co. in Westlake Village and clobbered consumers in Europe.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly five decades after the infamy of Pearl Harbor, Japan and the United States once again find themselves in a state of belligerence. This time, however, it is a war of words instead of bullets, and casualties are counted in terms of disputed opinions, warped perceptions and ruffled sensibilities. So much fur is flying these days that it is easy to lose sight of the fact that Japanese and Americans still basically like each other.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Branding it "protectionism at its worst," President Reagan on Wednesday vetoed controversial legislation that would increase quotas on textile imports, saying it would threaten American jobs, raise prices and jeopardize prospects for increasing U.S. exports around the world. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said that the President is confident Congress will not override the veto.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2006 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
The momentous power shift on Capitol Hill last week briefly sounded alarm bells on Wall Street. Some investors quickly dumped healthcare and defense stocks on fears that the Democratic takeover of Congress would hurt those industries. But apart from those sectors, the market couldn't identify many other potential casualties of the changeover. If the end of the 4-year-old stock bull run is near because Republicans no longer rule the House or the Senate, it wasn't apparent in broad market indexes.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2006 | Tobias Buck, Financial Times
From Paris to Berlin, and from Warsaw to Rome, governments are showing increasing hostility toward foreign companies wishing to take over prized national assets. The obstacles faced by bidders from abroad include discriminatory laws and downright opposition against individual mergers. The trend has caused concern not just in the boardrooms of acquisitive European companies, but also in the European Commission.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
For Hollywood, the decision this week by delegates to a key United Nations agency to back a treaty to promote cultural diversity is reading like the script to a bad sequel. On Friday, the Motion Picture Assn. of America trade group warned in a statement that the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization accord was protectionism in disguise, the latest attempt by some countries to enact barriers that could allow them to restrict the importing of American movies and music.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2005 | From Reuters
Two U.S. senators said Thursday that they had agreed to delay a vote on a bill threatening China with steep tariffs after being convinced that China could revalue its currency soon. Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told reporters that they had struck a deal with Treasury Secretary John W. Snow to put their bill on hold until later this year, giving China more time to act on its own to revalue the yuan.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2005 | Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writer
As the proposed Chinese purchase of Unocal Corp. fanned protectionist passions in Congress, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan warned senators Thursday not to let their frustrations with China's economic policies breed reactions that would do the U.S. economy more harm than good. Proposed tariffs against Chinese goods and other forms of protectionism would significantly lower U.S. living standards and would not save American jobs, Greenspan told members of the Senate Finance Committee.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Growing protectionist sentiments in this country, which have escalated tensions between the United States and some of its key trading partners, are threatening to stall the global movement toward freer trade. That in turn could provoke trade wars that would slow global economic growth and penalize American consumers through higher prices for a wide variety of goods, including clothing and television sets, some economists fear.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This remote sawmill and paper-pulp town on the mouth of the Shingu River considers itself trendy. Folks still pride themselves on how they once imported the latest Tokyo fashions--far ahead of the big regional cities like Osaka and Nagoya--aboard the lumber boats that sailed regularly to and from the capital.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Growing protectionist sentiments in this country, which have escalated tensions between the United States and some of its key trading partners, are threatening to stall the global movement toward freer trade. That in turn could provoke trade wars that would slow global economic growth and penalize American consumers through higher prices for a wide variety of goods, including clothing and television sets, some economists fear.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2004 | From Associated Press
Mexico partially lifted its ban on U.S. beef imports, announcing that boneless cuts from animals less than 30 months old and veal from animals less than 9 months old could be imported. The government had imposed a ban Dec. 24, the day after a single case of mad-cow disease was reported in Washington state. Mexico has been the second-largest foreign market for U.S. beef. From Associated Press
BUSINESS
January 27, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. lawmakers should avoid protectionist policies as labor markets pass through a realignment that is causing a "high degree of pain" for some workers, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said. "Competition from abroad has risen to a point at which developed countries' lowest skilled workers are being priced out of the global labor market," Greenspan said via satellite to the HM Treasury Enterprise Conference in London.
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