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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1987 | From United Press International
An implanted bridge of tissue has stimulated the regrowth of nerve cells to fix brain damage in rats and may one day help make similar repairs in the thousands of people who suffer spinal cord injuries each year, scientists reported Thursday. Researchers at UC San Diego and the La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation used microscopically thin strips of tissue made of fibrous material taken from human placentas.
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NEWS
April 28, 1987 | HARRIS BROTMAN, Brotman is a Los Angeles geneticist and free-lance writer who specializes in health and medicine. and
Surgeons who repair bones are closely watching clinical experiments on a "bone glue" discovered at UCLA. If it works as expected, orthopedic, plastic and dental surgeons will apply it to human tissues to promote fresh, new bone development, strengthen the bond between living bone and artificial joints or prostheses, and speed healing. The glue is a protein found in powders made from the bones of humans, cows and pigs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988 | LARRY DOYLE, United Press International
Mary Beth Loughlin wore soft contact lenses for eight years, but now she's sick and tired of the hassle. "When they get gunked up with protein, there's all these different chemicals you have to use and they're expensive," the 24-year-old graphic designer says. "And my eyes must produce a lot of protein, because it was always a pain." Edith Lee, Loughlin's co-worker, adds this complaint about the soft contacts: "When you drop or lose them, they turn into Saran Wrap."
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Forgotten how to do something you just learned yesterday? Consider the possibility that last night's sleep was punctuated by mini-awakenings, robbing you of the ability to commit that new skill to memory. You might have gotten eight hours of sleep, and may not even feel tired. But when sleep is interrupted frequently--as it is in a wide range of disorders, including sleep apnea, alcoholism and Alzheimer's disease--the ability to learn new things can be dramatically impaired, says a new study conducted on mice.
HEALTH
October 11, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Barry Sears disapproves of my breakfast. He is unimpressed by my lunch. And my afternoon snack is just awful. The breakfast: a toasted bagel, spread thickly with peanut butter. "What was it--one of those big L.A. bagels?" he asks. "Basically, what you had was the politically correct version of a Dunkin' Donut--the worst of all possible worlds. A lot of fat. And a lot of insulin. I bet that two hours after eating it you were famished again."
FOOD
August 29, 1996 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES DEPUTY FOOD EDITOR
Frying is one of the most violent means of cooking possible, and anyone who would deep-fry something without providing it at least a thin blanket of protective batter is nothing short of a barbarian. Without a batter, food fries to a frazzle: crisp, yes, but shrunken and shriveled as well. Only the tough survive, so it should be no surprise that the foods that last are usually tough, or at least stringy. But with a batter, you get the best of both worlds.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Scientists at UC San Francisco and the Chiron Corp. have taken the first step in development of a vaccine against chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted disease in this country and a leading cause of blindness in the Third World. The researchers, led by molecular biologist Richard Stephens, have cloned and sequenced the gene for a protein on the surface of the chlamydia bacterium. The protein in turn could become the key ingredient in a vaccine.
MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996
Laurie Garrett assesses the importance of the Human Genetic Project by taking the opinions of scientists who get funding from the project and representatives of companies that intend to market products derived from the research ("Do We Really Want to Know All This" March 3). The article implies that one can "decipher" a gene simply by determining the sequence of nucleotides that compose the gene. In fact, determining the sequence is relatively easy; understanding the function of the protein specified by the gene is much harder.
SCIENCE
August 14, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
By the light of day, the two transgenic baby rabbits look no different from their non-transgenic siblings -- white, fluffy and very cute. But put the whole litter under a black light, and you'll know exactly which two bunnies are special. They'll be glowing bright , fluorescent green. (For daylight and black-light shots of the transgenic rabbits and their littermates, see the photo gallery above). The glowing bunnies were born this month in a lab at the University of Istanbul.
NEWS
February 12, 1986 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
Scientists have discovered that HTLV-III, the virus that causes AIDS, uses a surprisingly novel mechanism to genetically control the cells it invades, and they say this finding opens the way for the development of new kinds of anti-AIDS drugs. In an interview, Dr. William A.
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