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NATIONAL
January 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, depends on more than 250 human genes to grow, a finding that reveals the lethal virus' weakness and may lead to new ways to attack it, scientists said. By blocking genes in infected cells, scientists tied the virus' survival to processes of protein transport, entry to the nucleus and cellular self-destruction, Harvard University scientists said in a study released today by the journal Science. With just nine genes that make 15 proteins, HIV must assume control of the protein-making machinery of infected cells to reproduce itself.
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NEWS
August 2, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Researchers believe that within three months they will isolate the entire gene responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which would be a major step toward unraveling the mystery of the fatal disease that strikes one in every 3,300 males. Last fall, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital announced that they had identified the gene that causes the most common form of muscular dystrophy and isolated part of it.
FOOD
June 6, 2001 | Donna Deane
Our favorite way of serving Gardenburger's new vegetarian Chik'n Grill burger is on a toasted bun with sprouts, sliced avocado and tomato. Each 2.5-ounce soy burger contains 13 grams of protein but just 100 calories and no cholesterol or saturated fat. Gardenburger's Meatless Chik'n Grill filets, 10-ounce package of four, at Albertson's, Ralphs and Whole Foods stores. $3.79 to $3.99.
HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Every so often, we take a candid look at the private dietary lives of people whose food choices need a makeover. Up this week: the kitchen and dining habits of 22-year-old Jessica Watson and her boyfriend, 31-year-old Todd Preboski. She's a vegan; he eats fish but no other animal-based foods. Such diets may conjure up images of fresh vegetables and fruits, nuts, tofu and whole grains. But a lack of time and planning have cornered the couple into relying too often on Taco Bell burritos, protein bars and potato chips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1987 | From United Press International
An implanted bridge of tissue has stimulated the regrowth of nerve cells to fix brain damage in rats and may one day help make similar repairs in the thousands of people who suffer spinal cord injuries each year, scientists reported Thursday. Researchers at UC San Diego and the La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation used microscopically thin strips of tissue made of fibrous material taken from human placentas.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | HARRIS BROTMAN, Brotman is a Los Angeles geneticist and free-lance writer who specializes in health and medicine. and
Surgeons who repair bones are closely watching clinical experiments on a "bone glue" discovered at UCLA. If it works as expected, orthopedic, plastic and dental surgeons will apply it to human tissues to promote fresh, new bone development, strengthen the bond between living bone and artificial joints or prostheses, and speed healing. The glue is a protein found in powders made from the bones of humans, cows and pigs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988 | LARRY DOYLE, United Press International
Mary Beth Loughlin wore soft contact lenses for eight years, but now she's sick and tired of the hassle. "When they get gunked up with protein, there's all these different chemicals you have to use and they're expensive," the 24-year-old graphic designer says. "And my eyes must produce a lot of protein, because it was always a pain." Edith Lee, Loughlin's co-worker, adds this complaint about the soft contacts: "When you drop or lose them, they turn into Saran Wrap."
HEALTH
August 4, 2012 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
It's too late to lose that unwanted weight for summer. But if you start now - and aim to shed a modest 2 pounds a week - you could drop as much as 40 pounds in time to ring in 2013. The hardest part, however, might be choosing a new diet. This season's crop of cookbooks includes a whiplash-inducing array of advice. For every book urging you on to eat: More carbs! More protein! More fat! there's another seemingly well-reasoned argument to do the opposite. As if this isn't confusing enough, there's a new bogeyman on the diet scene: gluten.
HEALTH
October 11, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Barry Sears disapproves of my breakfast. He is unimpressed by my lunch. And my afternoon snack is just awful. The breakfast: a toasted bagel, spread thickly with peanut butter. "What was it--one of those big L.A. bagels?" he asks. "Basically, what you had was the politically correct version of a Dunkin' Donut--the worst of all possible worlds. A lot of fat. And a lot of insulin. I bet that two hours after eating it you were famished again."
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Scientists at UC San Francisco and the Chiron Corp. have taken the first step in development of a vaccine against chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted disease in this country and a leading cause of blindness in the Third World. The researchers, led by molecular biologist Richard Stephens, have cloned and sequenced the gene for a protein on the surface of the chlamydia bacterium. The protein in turn could become the key ingredient in a vaccine.
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