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SCIENCE
July 24, 2013 | Sarah Hashim-Waris
We're about halfway through the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. This is the time of year when an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide abstain from eating, drinking, smoking and sex during daylight hours. That's right -- we give up food, water, coffee and even cronuts from sunup to sundown to commemorate God's revelation of Islam's holy book, the Koran, to the Prophet Muhammad. Instead of spending afternoons with friends at Starbucks, Muslims focus on achieving self-discipline and reflection, while feeling the plight of those less fortunate.
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NEWS
August 2, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Researchers believe that within three months they will isolate the entire gene responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which would be a major step toward unraveling the mystery of the fatal disease that strikes one in every 3,300 males. Last fall, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital announced that they had identified the gene that causes the most common form of muscular dystrophy and isolated part of it.
SCIENCE
October 31, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The search for an HIV vaccine has taken an important step forward after researchers at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla managed to capture molecular images of a protein spike that allows the deadly virus to invade human immune cells to hack their genetic code. The ability to control and analyze that shape-shifting envelope trimer protein, which has evaded the best efforts of biochemistry for more than a decade, could offer researchers the ability to see whether they can induce natural antibodies to attack the virus' most vulnerable spot, a crucial step toward engineering a vaccine.
FOOD
June 6, 2001 | Donna Deane
Our favorite way of serving Gardenburger's new vegetarian Chik'n Grill burger is on a toasted bun with sprouts, sliced avocado and tomato. Each 2.5-ounce soy burger contains 13 grams of protein but just 100 calories and no cholesterol or saturated fat. Gardenburger's Meatless Chik'n Grill filets, 10-ounce package of four, at Albertson's, Ralphs and Whole Foods stores. $3.79 to $3.99.
HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Every so often, we take a candid look at the private dietary lives of people whose food choices need a makeover. Up this week: the kitchen and dining habits of 22-year-old Jessica Watson and her boyfriend, 31-year-old Todd Preboski. She's a vegan; he eats fish but no other animal-based foods. Such diets may conjure up images of fresh vegetables and fruits, nuts, tofu and whole grains. But a lack of time and planning have cornered the couple into relying too often on Taco Bell burritos, protein bars and potato chips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1987 | From United Press International
An implanted bridge of tissue has stimulated the regrowth of nerve cells to fix brain damage in rats and may one day help make similar repairs in the thousands of people who suffer spinal cord injuries each year, scientists reported Thursday. Researchers at UC San Diego and the La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation used microscopically thin strips of tissue made of fibrous material taken from human placentas.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | HARRIS BROTMAN, Brotman is a Los Angeles geneticist and free-lance writer who specializes in health and medicine. and
Surgeons who repair bones are closely watching clinical experiments on a "bone glue" discovered at UCLA. If it works as expected, orthopedic, plastic and dental surgeons will apply it to human tissues to promote fresh, new bone development, strengthen the bond between living bone and artificial joints or prostheses, and speed healing. The glue is a protein found in powders made from the bones of humans, cows and pigs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988 | LARRY DOYLE, United Press International
Mary Beth Loughlin wore soft contact lenses for eight years, but now she's sick and tired of the hassle. "When they get gunked up with protein, there's all these different chemicals you have to use and they're expensive," the 24-year-old graphic designer says. "And my eyes must produce a lot of protein, because it was always a pain." Edith Lee, Loughlin's co-worker, adds this complaint about the soft contacts: "When you drop or lose them, they turn into Saran Wrap."
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Scientists at UC San Francisco and the Chiron Corp. have taken the first step in development of a vaccine against chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted disease in this country and a leading cause of blindness in the Third World. The researchers, led by molecular biologist Richard Stephens, have cloned and sequenced the gene for a protein on the surface of the chlamydia bacterium. The protein in turn could become the key ingredient in a vaccine.
MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996
Laurie Garrett assesses the importance of the Human Genetic Project by taking the opinions of scientists who get funding from the project and representatives of companies that intend to market products derived from the research ("Do We Really Want to Know All This" March 3). The article implies that one can "decipher" a gene simply by determining the sequence of nucleotides that compose the gene. In fact, determining the sequence is relatively easy; understanding the function of the protein specified by the gene is much harder.
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