Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsProteins
IN THE NEWS

Proteins

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Mahlon Hoagland, who helped unravel the mystery of how cells build proteins by discovering a molecule that brings individual amino acids to growing protein chains and who spent the latter part of his career explaining biology to the public in a series of well- received books, died Sept. 18 at his home in Thetford, Vt. He was 87. He had been suffering from cardiovascular disease and kidney failure and chose to abstain from food and drink to die peacefully, lingering for nine days with his family at hand.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 24, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Between vaccine refusal, drug resistant strains of bacteria, and the growing ranks of the immuno-compromised, it sometimes seems that we humans are losing our brief moment of superiority in the unending arms race against pathogens. But a new technique has shown remarkable promise in mice infected with deadly forms of meningitis and pneumonia, and may point the way to regaining the upper hand against a wide range of infections. A genetically reengineered version of an immune system protein called properdin appears to activate a robust immune response against invading pathogens, according to a study published Monday in the journal PNAS.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Human tears are thought to be unique in the animal kingdom, in that they're often tied to our emotional state -- but that's not the only special property they possess. Proteins in tears can protect against harmful bacteria, and now a team of UC Irvine researchers has shown how. Lysozymes are antiseptic proteins found in a number of bodily fluids, including tears. Their anti-bacterial properties were first identified by Nobel laureate Alexander Fleming, discoverer of penicillin, in the 1920s, but it was unclear how these proteins could take out bacteria much bigger than them.
SCIENCE
March 4, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Consuming high levels of protein - particularly animal protein - is a bad strategy if you're at midlife and aiming to live into old age, new research finds. But a study out Tuesday reveals that in older age, fortifying one's diet with more protein-rich foods appears to be a formula for extending life. An article published in the journal Cell Metabolism says that, over an 18-year study period, middle-aged Americans who had the highest consumption of protein were more than four times as likely to die of cancer or diabetes, and twice as likely to die of any cause, than those whose diets were lowest in protein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Pygmies appear to have unusually low levels of an important protein involved in growth, possibly explaining why they are so short and offering clues to shortness in other groups, researchers reported Wednesday. A study involving 20 African Pygmies found they appear to have very low levels of growth hormone-binding protein, which may be why they fail to experience a growth spurt at puberty. "This is very exciting to me," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
In the latest in a series of landmark studies involving muscular dystrophy, researchers reported last week they had identified a protein defect that apparently causes a less severe form of the crippling disorder. The findings reported in the New England Journal of Medicine will enable doctors to better diagnose various forms of the disease and should help in the search for treatments, experts said.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Reuters
Harvard University researchers announced Friday they had discovered a key protein that plays a pivotal role in directing a fertilized egg to develop into a complex animal. The protein, known as an activin, induced a fertilized frog egg to develop in the laboratory into a miniature embryo, with head, eyes and muscles, the researchers said.
SCIENCE
December 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Autism and other brain disorders may be the result of a missing protein important for building communication networks in the brain, MIT researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Neuron. They found that lack of an enzyme called Cdk5, which instructs a synapse-building protein called CASK, leads to a severe deficit in the formation of synapses. Other research has suggested that a deficiency of synapses is associated with autism.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
A natural human protein studied by scientists for years for its possible anti-cancer effect now has been found to play a possible major role in causing a highly lethal form of malaria that affects the brain. The new information comes from experiments with mouse malaria and from preliminary studies with human malaria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Scientists have discovered a second protein that appears lacking in muscular dystrophy patients, an important development in the hunt for a treatment for the crippling disease, it was reported last week in the British journal Nature. The muscle cells of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients are missing about 90% of a newly identified protein, which is called dystrophin-associated glycoprotein 156 or DAG 156, said researchers at the University of Iowa medical school in Iowa City.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The long-running "Got Milk?" slogan promoting milk consumption in the U.S. has been nixed. The  Milk Processor Education Program, funded by milk processors, has launched a  new ad campaign that aims to emphasize milk's protein content to get Americans to drink more milk. Rather than feature celebrities sporting milk mustaches, the new ad campaign -- "Milk Life" -- touts milk's nutritional qualities and urges Americans to drink more of it in the morning. In one ad, a young man is shown break dancing amid a swirl of milk, and the text reads: "What 8 grams of protein looks like when you're breaking the laws of physics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
DNA and proteins are arguably the most important components of the cells of living creatures. Both are produced by stringing together long chains of individual molecules - amino acids in the case of proteins and nucleotides in DNA. Understanding the identity of the individual molecules in these chains and the sequence in which they are strung together proved to be one of the major biological challenges of the last century. Only by unlocking these sequences would scientists be able not only to understand the fundamental workings of biochemistry, but also to duplicate it. In the early 1950s, British biochemist Frederick Sanger of Cambridge University developed the first viable technique for determining the amino acid sequence of proteins and used it to describe the structure of insulin, which is composed of 51 amino acids.
SCIENCE
October 7, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Three scientists who study the inner workings of cells have won the 2013 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for their work in unraveling the mystery of how proteins, hormones and other molecules are moved around inside cells and exported to other parts of the body. The Nobel committee lauded Randy W. Schekman of UC Berkeley, Thomas C. Suedhof of Stanford University and James E. Rothman of Yale University for making known "the exquisitely precise control system for the transport and delivery of cellular cargo.
HEALTH
August 2, 2013 | By Judy Mandell
Joseph J. Colella has performed more than 4,000 weight-loss surgeries. But the bariatric surgeon at St. Margaret's Hospital at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center would like to keep people from needing the OR by finding practical strategies to keep obesity at bay. We talked with him about fiber. Is a high-fiber diet important for weight loss? The conventional wisdom is that a diet high in fiber is important for weight loss and overall weight management. While there is some general truth to this, the reality is that the priority of a high-fiber diet in the weight loss solution is far from the top of the list.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Taco Bell will test a new Power Protein menu and zero-calorie drinks later this summer as the Mexican-style chain aims to convince Americans that its offerings include healthful choices. The Irvine-based chain will experiment first for five or six weeks in Dayton, Ohio, where it has roughly 40 stores. The company, which has nearly 6,000 restaurants in the U.S., is looking at 2014 for a more wide-scale launch of the new menu and beverages. The Power Protein menu features items that include more than 20 grams of protein but 450 calories or less.  A burrito, for example, features a double portion of chicken or steak with 400 and 420 calories, respectively.
HEALTH
May 18, 2013 | Mary MacVean
For more than 20 years, Kristine Kidd tasted what came her way as the food editor at Bon Appetit magazine. But she never felt great. "I had digestive issues my whole life," she says, but 2 1/2 years ago, the aching joints, bloating, fatigue and digestive problems became so severe she couldn't ignore the symptoms of celiac disease. She had already left her job and started doing some research, she says in the roomy, sunny kitchen of her hilltop home in Topanga Canyon. "I was so miserable.
HEALTH
May 18, 2013
What is gluten? Gluten is a protein that is found in certain grains, including wheat, barley and rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). What problems prompt people to avoid gluten? Gluten causes inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disease diagnosed with a blood test or biopsy; other symptoms include digestive problems, anemia, fatigue, headaches and joint pain. Avoiding gluten is the treatment, though there is no cure.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers not to eat certain ProtiDiet High Protein Chocolate Dream bars due to possible contamination with salmonella , according to an FDA statement Monday. The manufacturer, Pro-Amino International Inc., of Saint-Eustache, Quebec, Canada, has recalled the protein bars, which are sold in seven-bar packages. The packages bear the folllowing marks: UPC 6 21498 42238 1, lot code CR 18 13B and best before date 2015-08, according to an FDA news release.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|