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July 12, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Fifteen minutes, that's all we're asking," potbellied Belfast Orangeman Robert Mills, an unemployed assembly line worker, complained Saturday. "If they can't tolerate that, what can they tolerate?"
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NEWS
July 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
British authorities on Thursday banned a second Protestant parade from passing through Roman Catholic territory, as the province suffered through a fifth straight night of tension between the rival factions. There were concerns that the verdict could further fuel widespread demonstrations and rioting, and later Thursday, Catholic and Protestant groups skirmished in two parts of Belfast. However, the level of violence was significantly lower than on previous evenings.
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NEWS
January 25, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the cold, gray winter drizzle that makes West Belfast gloomier than usual, the whitewashed slogans on the dark stone walls along the Falls Road stand out: "Support the Peace Process" and "Back the Peace Initiative." The upbeat messages in this heavily Roman Catholic, republican area refer to the Dec.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked a Roman Catholic area of Belfast, injuring two men, officials said. The BBC cited "security sources" as saying an explosive device caused the blast. Northern Ireland police said it was not yet clear what prompted the bomb attack. The explosion came a day after a pro-British guerrilla group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, threatened to end its six-year cease-fire unless Catholic republicans stopped attacking Protestants in Belfast, the provincial capital.
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | From Reuters
A Roman Catholic man was killed in Northern Ireland early Saturday in what appeared to be a slaying by Protestant Loyalists opposed to the province's peace process. Police said they were pursuing the possibility that members of the terrorist Loyalist Volunteer Force killed 35-year-old Brian Service, who was shot several times at close range in a north Belfast street. He died later in a hospital. Parties that draw their support from the Catholic community were quick to condemn the killing.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked a Roman Catholic area of Belfast, injuring two men, officials said. The BBC cited "security sources" as saying an explosive device caused the blast. Northern Ireland police said it was not yet clear what prompted the bomb attack. The explosion came a day after a pro-British guerrilla group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, threatened to end its six-year cease-fire unless Catholic republicans stopped attacking Protestants in Belfast, the provincial capital.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
British authorities on Thursday banned a second Protestant parade from passing through Roman Catholic territory, as the province suffered through a fifth straight night of tension between the rival factions. There were concerns that the verdict could further fuel widespread demonstrations and rioting, and later Thursday, Catholic and Protestant groups skirmished in two parts of Belfast. However, the level of violence was significantly lower than on previous evenings.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | Reuters
Britain's minister for Northern Ireland met leaders of the Protestant Unionist majority Friday for talks that could present the best chance of peace in 70 years. On the eve of talks with Peter Brooke, veteran Unionist Ian Paisley ruled out any say for the independent Irish Republic on the internal affairs of Northern Ireland, which has been under direct rule from London for 17 years.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | PAUL DEAN
In 1989, the Earth trembled, skies poured, killer winds howled, tankers spilled and revolutions swept the globe. In Los Angeles, gang violence claimed yet more victims and traffic seemed to grow ever worse. Still, amid the tide of oft-tragic happenings, small rays of hope keep shining through. Here are a few of many stories worth sharing on a day of feasting, family and friends. They're enough to remind that it's still worth saying: "Oh, Thank Goodness."
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | From Reuters
A Roman Catholic man was killed in Northern Ireland early Saturday in what appeared to be a slaying by Protestant Loyalists opposed to the province's peace process. Police said they were pursuing the possibility that members of the terrorist Loyalist Volunteer Force killed 35-year-old Brian Service, who was shot several times at close range in a north Belfast street. He died later in a hospital. Parties that draw their support from the Catholic community were quick to condemn the killing.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Two Northern Ireland police officers were injured Saturday as sporadic scuffles marred a traditional Protestant parade in this largely Catholic city. Police said a third officer went to his colleagues' rescue when he saw them being severely beaten and fired two shots in the air "to disperse the crowd and prevent further injury." Both officers, one with a bloodied forehead, were hospitalized in stable condition.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Fifteen minutes, that's all we're asking," potbellied Belfast Orangeman Robert Mills, an unemployed assembly line worker, complained Saturday. "If they can't tolerate that, what can they tolerate?"
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tensions rose in Northern Ireland after Protestants were banned Monday from marching--in the ceremonial garb of their Orange Order brotherhood--through a Catholic area next weekend. Keen to keep a power-sharing peace agreement for the troubled province on track, the British government has already sent an extra 1,000 troops to Northern Ireland to deal with possible violence during the Protestant "marching season."
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Rev. Ian Paisley, a Protestant who leads the Democratic Unionist Party, sought to remove two Protestant parties linked to paramilitary groups from peace talks. Paisley feared the presence of the two groups, which have issued death threats against two of their own members for opposing a truce, could pave the way for Sinn Fein, the political wing of the Irish Republican Army, to rejoin the talks. Sinn Fein was barred when the IRA resumed its fight against British rule in February.
NEWS
September 21, 1989
The names of up to 75 Irish Republican Army suspects may have been leaked by rogue Northern Ireland police and troops to Protestant killer gangs, a member of a nationalist party said in Belfast. "It seems now that this is never-ending," Seamus Mallon of the Social Democratic and Labor Party said after a constituent was sent a list of suspects and the death threat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Northern Ireland has endured 25 years of sectarian violence between Catholics and Protestants and eight months of peace. Now, as hundreds of business and political leaders gathered this week for a White House conference to encourage U.S. investment in the economically depressed country, Irish Cardinal Cahan Daly and Presbyterian leader John Dunlop conceded that jobs alone won't end the enmity.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his office on Dublin Road, George Patton, head of the 80,000-member Orange Lodge, sounded a theme often heard within Northern Ireland's Protestant community. "We Protestants have been in Northern Ireland for close to 400 years, and we remain very much British in our hearts and minds," he said. "How long do you have to live in your place until you can call it home?" "An American from West Virginia," he added, "may consider himself a West Virginian, but he is first an American.
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