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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1994 | MARY LOU PICKEL
From her corner office on the ground floor of the county Hall of Administration, Gayle Anderson, the county's official diplomat, fields calls from foreign ambassadors, makes appointments to meet royalty, and chats with foreign businessmen interested in Orange County. Anderson's volunteer work as chief of protocol is all part of a 10-year effort by the county office of protocol to change the county image from that of sidekick to Los Angeles to one of haven for international investment.
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NEWS
August 7, 1990 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bee Canterbury Lavery took over as the city's chief of protocol 17 years ago, Los Angeles was, diplomatically speaking, just coming out of the Dark Ages. It was still a rough-at-the-edges movie town, where "international relations" meant the torrid, ocean-hopping affairs that people like Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton used to conduct. Nobody was paying much attention to the niceties of diplomacy, says Lavery, a gregarious woman with a taste for brightly colored blazers.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 8-by-10-inch brown envelope containing President Bush's letter to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein lay in the center of the table for the entire U.S.-Iraq meeting in Geneva. But Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz never touched it. Secretary of State James A. Baker III decided to keep the sealed envelope within Aziz's reach for the entire meeting in case the Iraqi official relented in his refusal to accept it, State Department officials said Thursday.
SPORTS
July 5, 1993 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Baseball is a red-blooded sport for red-blooded men. It's no pink tea, and mollycoddles had better stay out. It's . . . a struggle for supremacy, a survival of the fittest." --Ty Cobb, My Life in Baseball: The True Record * Dave Winfield picked himself up off of the ground and slapped the dirt off of his uniform. He stepped out of the batter's box and eyeballed Chuck Crim, then pitching for the Angels.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | LOIS ROMANO, THE WASHINGTON POST
"OK, get this scene," Protocol Chief Joseph Verner Reed instructs his current chronicler. "Blair House dining room. President of Philippines at the head of a sit-down dinner for 18. Everything to perfection: glass, china, silver, flowers, guest list--including Cabinet and senators. "OK, are you ready?" he asks, about to resume his rapid-fire burst of staccato. "You will not believe this. Somebody left the bathtub running upstairs! This was not a drip. This was not a glass of water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Mr. Smith in Washington, Mike Feuer's introduction to the weird world of City Hall politics began moments after he was sworn in Monday as the newest member of the Los Angeles City Council. During a brief lesson on council protocol, Feuer learned the following: * Unless he presses the "no" button on a panel installed on his chamber desk, he will automatically be recorded as a "yes" vote.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As darkness fell in Washington on Dec. 7, 1941, a crowd gathered outside the Japanese Embassy on Massachusetts Avenue. Inside, diplomats grew so worried that they called a private detective agency seeking protection. But even on this day of infamy, the Japanese need not have worried. The FBI soon arrived to throw a protective shield around the embassy, and ultimately the United States saw that the embassy staff members were returned safely to their homeland.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | EVE BELSON, Eve Belson is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Is it OK to give a king a friendly slap on the back? Sure, if he's a king of rock 'n' roll, a king of swat or a king of the silver screen. But don't try it on a genuine blueblood. Protocol dictates that you should never touch royalty unless one of them touches you first. And going on past record (several thousand years or so), the chances of a commoner getting a royal backslap are pretty remote.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | ANDREW BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Brazilians gasped. At their consulate in San Francisco last April, Brazilian dignitaries and World Cup '94 officials had nodded their approval to a plan to fly thousands of eager fans to Brazil's opening match against Russia. But with one gesture, an American World Cup official slipped over the cultural divide: He flashed the OK sign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - California may be stymied for years to come in its efforts to resume executions as a result of a new court ruling, bureaucratic requirements and difficulty obtaining lethal injection drugs, advocates on both sides of the death penalty said Friday. Supporters of capital punishment urged Gov. Brown to challenge a state appeals court's unanimous decision against California's lethal injection protocol, even though an appeal could take years. They also called on the governor to introduce a new single-drug execution method for public vetting.
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