Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsProvince
IN THE NEWS

Province

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
September 15, 2009 | Associated Press
Adulterers can be stoned to death and homosexuality is punishable by steep prison terms under a new law passed unanimously in Indonesia's devoutly Muslim province of Aceh on Monday. Aceh's regional parliament adopted the bill despite strong objections from human rights groups and the province's deputy governor, who said the legislation needed more careful consideration because it imposes a new form of capital punishment. The chairman of the 69-seat house asked whether the bill could be passed into law and members answered in unison: "Yes, it can."
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 12, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - Each side in the Syrian conflict blamed the other Saturday for an alleged poison gas attack that reportedly injured scores of civilians in the central province of Hama. There was no independent confirmation of a chemical strike, which reportedly hit the village of Kfar Zeita, an agricultural center northwest of the provincial capital, Hama. Fierce clashes between rebel and loyalist forces have been reported in the area. Various pro-opposition accounts said a government air raid Friday in Kfar Zeita included bombardment with an unspecified chemical agent, causing choking and suffocation among scores of residents.
Advertisement
WORLD
October 30, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas, Los Angeles Times
At the end of a dirt road deep in the mountains, Consolacion Acay hobbled onto her porch and picked up her tools of the trade: a glass cup, a bamboo straw, a stone the size of an apricot pit and a bottle of potion. Then she began casting spells to heal her client. "I found this stone while I was swimming near waterfalls in the middle of the island," the unassuming 86-year-old said later. "That night I had a dream that taught me how to use the stone to heal people, and I've been doing it ever since.
WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Aoun Sahi
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A powerful bomb ripped through a passenger train in Pakistan's restive southwestern province of Baluchistan, killing at least 17 people and wounding 46 others, police said. Five children were believed to be among the dead. Police officials said the bomb went off when a train bound for the garrison city of Rawalpindi reached Sibi, a district situated about 100 miles from Quetta, the capital of Baluchistan province. A separatist group called the United Baluch Army claimed responsibility for the blast, which it said was in retaliation for attacks by Pakistani security forces this week on rebel hideouts in Baluchistan that reportedly killed 40 people.
WORLD
March 30, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
KABUL, Afghanistan -- U.S. military leaders on Saturday formally handed over security responsibilities to Afghan troops in an area of Wardak province that was the focus of claims by President Hamid Karzai that U.S. troops were responsible for kidnappings and human rights abuses. The transfer of a base in the Nerkh district of Wardak province from U.S. special operations forces to Afghan troops comes 10 days after Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, commander of the U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan, reached an agreement with Karzai to carry out the handover.
WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Aoun Sahi
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A powerful bomb ripped through a passenger train in Pakistan's restive southwestern province of Baluchistan, killing at least 17 people and wounding 46 others, police said. Five children were believed to be among the dead. Police officials said the bomb went off when a train bound for the garrison city of Rawalpindi reached Sibi, a district situated about 100 miles from Quetta, the capital of Baluchistan province. A separatist group called the United Baluch Army claimed responsibility for the blast, which it said was in retaliation for attacks by Pakistani security forces this week on rebel hideouts in Baluchistan that reportedly killed 40 people.
WORLD
February 25, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The U.S. military has determined that its forces weren't involved in the alleged abduction and killing of civilians in a troubled province in eastern Afghanistan, officials said Monday. "In recent months, a thorough review has confirmed that no coalition forces have been involved in the alleged misconduct in Wardak province," Lt. Col. Les Carroll, a spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan, said in a statement. A day earlier, Afghan President Hamid Karzai accused U.S. special forces troops and Afghans working for them of torturing civilians in Wardak, a strategic but violence-wracked province southwest of the capital, Kabul.
WORLD
April 6, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
AREHA, Syria - Five times a day, for 15 years, the muezzin made the call to prayer from the mosque's minaret, which rose high above the roofs of the modest homes surrounding it. When soldiers, their tanks positioned throughout the city, asked him whether rebel fighters used the minaret, he told them, "I swear no one goes up there except for me. " But a few Sundays ago, when Areha was under near-constant bombardment, a shell slammed into...
NEWS
October 29, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA -- The province of Kwa Zulu Natal, which has among the highest rate of HIV infections in South Africa, will offer circumcision to prisoners in a bid to stop the transmission of the virus in jails. Recent HIV testing in the province indicated that of 710,000 people tested for the virus, more than 150,000 were infected. A campaign on HIV aims to test 15 million South Africans, around a third of he population, by next June. The provincial government’s head of health, Dr. Sinbongiseni Dhlomo, said more than 10,000 men had been circumcised in the province since a campaign to increase circumcisions began in April.
WORLD
February 24, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Sunday ordered U.S. special forces troops to leave a strategic eastern province, accusing the Americans and Afghans working for them of torturing and abducting civilians. Karzai's office charged that in Wardak province, southwest of Kabul, a university student who was detained during a U.S. operation was later found with his head and fingers cut off. In another case, U.S. forces allegedly detained nine villagers who are still missing.
WORLD
April 4, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - An Afghan police officer turned his weapon on two Western journalists Friday, killing one and wounding the other inside a security forces compound in eastern Afghanistan on the eve of the country's closely watched presidential election. Anja Niedringhaus, 48, a German and a veteran photographer for Associated Press, was killed instantly, and AP correspondent Kathy Gannon was shot three times, sustaining wrist and shoulder wounds, the news agency said. Gannon, 60, a Canadian who has covered Afghanistan for nearly three decades, was evacuated to the U.S. military base at Bagram and was reported to be in stable condition.
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Raja Abdulrahim
When the women's militia of an Al Qaeda splinter group recently raided a high school in the northern Syrian city of Raqqah, it found a range of violations of its strict interpretation of Islam. Ten young women were deemed guilty of donning a face veil that was too transparent, having visible eyebrows or wearing a hair clip under her hijab , or head covering. Each student was whipped 30 times, said one opposition activist, who asked to remain unidentified because he is wanted by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, the militant group that until recently was affiliated with Al Qaeda.
WORLD
March 8, 2014 | By Nabih Bulos and Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - After weeks of fighting, the Syrian military has wrested control of a rebel-held town near the Lebanese border in the strategic province of Homs, military and opposition representatives said Saturday. The seizure of Zara, close to the main highway linking Homs city to the Mediterranean coast, is the latest reported government advance in its effort to seal the porous border with Lebanon, long a conduit for antigovernment fighters and arms. In a statement, the Syrian military hailed the seizure of Zara, which "had been used as a main passage for the terrorist groups that would come from Lebanon and head to neighboring areas to carry out their criminal operations.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
SHANGHAI - At least 28 people died and more than 113 were injured Saturday when a group of assailants wielding large knives stormed into a railway station in southern China and apparently attacked people at random, state-run media reported. President Xi Jinping vowed swift action to punish those responsible for the bloody attack and "suppress terrorists' rampant momentum," the official New China News Agency reported. The agency said separatists from the far western region of Xinjiang were behind the highly unusual and terrifying attack in Kunming, the capital of Yunnan province.
WORLD
February 12, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Shashank Bengali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Nine members of an anti-Taliban militia were killed execution-style at a house on the outskirts of this troubled provincial capital, in the latest violence to mar the Pakistani government's effort to open peace talks with outlawed Islamist militants. Police said most of the victims were members of the same family, which had belonged to a local committee that helped law enforcement agencies track and thwart the movements of militant groups in the area. The militias were established in 2008 after a surge in militant activity in Peshawar and other parts of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, with authorities providing guns and ammunition to volunteers who conducted patrols in their areas.
WORLD
January 10, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams, This post has been updated and corrected, as indicated below.
Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Friday condemned the killing of a 4-year-old boy this week during a security patrol by international forces, adding to the animosity between Kabul and Washington that may leave the war-ravaged country on its own at the end of this year to deal with a resurgent Taliban. Karzai learned of the boy's death from visiting Helmand Gov. Naeem Baloch, presidential spokesman Aimal Faizi told journalists in Kabul. The boy apparently was hit when shots were fired during an International Security Assistance Force patrol through farmland in Helmand province, an ISAF spokesman said.
TRAVEL
January 9, 2011 | By Mike Ives, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One spring morning last year, I stuffed my rucksack with things I bring on camping trips in the U.S.: fleece, books 'n' socks, toothbrush, bug spray, sunshades. Then I shouldered my mandolin case, unlatched my apartment gate and stepped into the sunshine. I suspected this trip would be a bit different from my previous trips to American national parks. OK, a lot different: I live in Hanoi, and I was heading to fledgling national parks in southwestern China. My first challenge was getting to the parks on a shoestring budget — that is, without flying.
WORLD
September 21, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Fierce clashes were reported Thursday in an area of north-central Syria where antigovernment rebels earlier seized a border post across from Turkey. Word of fighting in Raqqah province suggests that the tribal region, long regarded as a bastion of support for the government of President Bashar Assad, could be the latest battle zone in a conflict that has spread across much of the nation. The region of Raqqah sits strategically between two heavily contested provinces: Aleppo and Dair Alzour, both featuring raging battles and large swaths of territory in rebel hands.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - A car bomb detonated Thursday near a school in the central Syrian province of Hama, killing 18 people, according to the Syrian government and opposition sources. The bomb exploded outside the town of Salmiya, killing mostly women and children, the reports said. The state-run news agency SANA said the attack left dozens wounded and caused "very significant" property damage. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based pro-opposition group, said the casualty toll was likely to rise.
WORLD
December 23, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
Syrian government airstrikes pounded the country's northern province of Aleppo for a ninth straight day Monday, killing more than 50 people as residents braced for more bombings, activists said. The sustained air offensive has left 300 to 500 people dead and thousands injured, according to human rights groups and activists. "We are trying to prevent people from gathering. People are walking under the balconies so they are not visible from the sky," said Khalid Omar, a pharmacist in the city of Aleppo.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|