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Psoriasis

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BUSINESS
February 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Biogen Inc. won U.S. approval to sell a treatment for psoriasis that lacks side effects of older drugs and could bring it $500 million in annual sales. Amevive, an injected medicine, won Food and Drug Administration clearance for patients with a form of the skin disease called moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis. The drug is expected to face competition from Amgen Inc.'s arthritis drug Enbrel, which is being studied as a psoriasis treatment.
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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy
A biological medication already widely used to treat plaque psoriasis may be able to slow the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a new study has found. The same study found that in older mice with established Alzheimer's, this treatment approach, which suppresses the brain's immune reaction to beta amyloid, brought a marked improvement in cognitive function and may even halt or reverse early signs of Alzheimer's. The new study was published this week in the journal Nature Medicine.
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HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Six months ago, my doctor diagnosed me with psoriasis and prescribed creams and lotions. I searched the Internet and found that some people use the spice turmeric to treat this skin problem. After one day taking turmeric, I quit the topicals, because my itching had stopped. Soon my psoriasis disappeared from my scalp, and my body has started to clear. Why don't doctors tell us about this remedy instead of just prescribing topical drugs? Doctors like evidence. While there are many testimonials on the benefits of the yellow spice turmeric or its active ingredient curcumin, placebo-controlled trials are inconclusive (Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, April 2008)
IMAGE
November 13, 2011 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cracked heels, chapped lips, scaly legs, fissured hands, skin so tight and parched it practically hurts to smile. All can be brought on by dry, hot Santa Ana winds common in the fall or by the cold weather and heated rooms of winter - and Angelenos have experienced a taste of both in the last couple of weeks. Even without harsh weather conditions, just spending time in one of Southern California's desert microclimates can be hard on skin. But there are some solutions for soothing the dryness.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Obesity in childhood significantly increases the risk of developing psoriasis, and psoriasis may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life by increasing cholesterol levels, researchers reported Wednesday. Patients with psoriasis early in life should be monitored for early signs of cardiovascular disease and given therapy to reduce the risk of later heart attacks and stroke, a team from Kaiser Permanente reported in the Journal of Pediatrics. Psoriasis is a common autoimmune condition characterized by skin redness and irritation.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Psoriasis medications, such as Enbrel and Remicade, are often effective but have been linked with reports of heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems. An analysis published Tuesday suggests that the medications do not raise the risk of cardiovascular side effects. But the authors of the study cautioned that more research is needed Researchers at Baylor Research Institute in Dallas, examined data from 22 studies to look at side effects related to treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis with biological therapies called anti-IL-12/23 agents.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson said it completed research that shows its drug Remicade improved symptoms of the skin disease psoriasis in about 80% of patients who took it. The study's results were presented in New Orleans to the American Academy of Dermatology. The company said it planned to ask the Food and Drug Administration to approve Remicade for use on psoriasis. Shares of New Brunswick, N.J.-based Johnson & Johnson rose 8 cents to $65.43 on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
Women who drink regular beer might be at higher risk for developing psoriasis, according to a new study released Monday in the Archives of Dermatology . Researchers looked at drinking habits among 83,000 women age 27 to 44 who were part of the Nurses' Health Study II. From that group, they analyzed 1,069 cases of psoriasis that occurred in a 14-year follow-up period. Women who had an average 2.3 drinks or more per week had a 72% greater risk of having psoriasis than women who didn't drink.
HEALTH
December 26, 2005 | From Reuters
People with psoriasis who smoke tend to have more severe cases than nonsmokers, but it may be a consequence and not a cause of the skin condition, researchers have found. The condition, which afflicts up to 3% of the world's population and runs in families, varies in severity though heavy smoking was associated with more severe cases, said Italian researchers from Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico in Rome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1988
People who undergo treatment for severe psoriasis are five times more likely to develop brain tumors than the general population, researchers reported last week. Psoriasis, a chronic skin disorder characterized by red, scaly patches, affects as many as 4 million Americans. The cause of the disease is unknown.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Psoriasis medications, such as Enbrel and Remicade, are often effective but have been linked with reports of heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems. An analysis published Tuesday suggests that the medications do not raise the risk of cardiovascular side effects. But the authors of the study cautioned that more research is needed Researchers at Baylor Research Institute in Dallas, examined data from 22 studies to look at side effects related to treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis with biological therapies called anti-IL-12/23 agents.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Poor Kim Kardashian. It's not enough that she's perpetually hounded by photographers. Now she apparently has psoriasis. Her condition was revealed on a recent episode of "Keeping Up with the Kardashians" on E!. We see the reality star sitting on an examining table, 3-inch shiny gold platform pumps on her delicate feet, showing several pinkish spots on her legs to her dermatologist. "So, I have this, like, rash," she says, pulling up her jeans. Her sister Khloe, she says, seems to think it's ringworm, but Kim admits she doesn't know what that is. "It's not ringworm.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Obesity in childhood significantly increases the risk of developing psoriasis, and psoriasis may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life by increasing cholesterol levels, researchers reported Wednesday. Patients with psoriasis early in life should be monitored for early signs of cardiovascular disease and given therapy to reduce the risk of later heart attacks and stroke, a team from Kaiser Permanente reported in the Journal of Pediatrics. Psoriasis is a common autoimmune condition characterized by skin redness and irritation.
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was my freshman year of college, and my expectations were being met — college was turning out to be the best time of my life — until I developed psoriasis. For spring break, I went to New Orleans to help rebuild homes, but when I returned, I had an itchy rash on my chest and neck. I didn't think much about it, figuring that maybe I'd picked up something in Louisiana. I tried over-the-counter cortisone cream for the itching, but practically overnight the rash grew and covered most of my chest, neck and jaw. Campus health services diagnosed the rash as psoriasis — and my life would change forever.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Six months ago, my doctor diagnosed me with psoriasis and prescribed creams and lotions. I searched the Internet and found that some people use the spice turmeric to treat this skin problem. After one day taking turmeric, I quit the topicals, because my itching had stopped. Soon my psoriasis disappeared from my scalp, and my body has started to clear. Why don't doctors tell us about this remedy instead of just prescribing topical drugs? Doctors like evidence. While there are many testimonials on the benefits of the yellow spice turmeric or its active ingredient curcumin, placebo-controlled trials are inconclusive (Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, April 2008)
NEWS
August 16, 2010
Women who drink regular beer might be at higher risk for developing psoriasis, according to a new study released Monday in the Archives of Dermatology . Researchers looked at drinking habits among 83,000 women age 27 to 44 who were part of the Nurses' Health Study II. From that group, they analyzed 1,069 cases of psoriasis that occurred in a 14-year follow-up period. Women who had an average 2.3 drinks or more per week had a 72% greater risk of having psoriasis than women who didn't drink.
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was my freshman year of college, and my expectations were being met — college was turning out to be the best time of my life — until I developed psoriasis. For spring break, I went to New Orleans to help rebuild homes, but when I returned, I had an itchy rash on my chest and neck. I didn't think much about it, figuring that maybe I'd picked up something in Louisiana. I tried over-the-counter cortisone cream for the itching, but practically overnight the rash grew and covered most of my chest, neck and jaw. Campus health services diagnosed the rash as psoriasis — and my life would change forever.
HEALTH
March 29, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Q: The other day, someone wrote asking about kidney stones. To cut down on kidney stones, I drink several glasses of lemonade a week. A: There is some scientific basis for your observation. Doctors often prescribe potassium citrate to disrupt kidney-stone formation. Lemonade also contains citrate, and some research shows that lemonade therapy reduces the rate of kidney-stone formation (Journal of Urology, April 2007). Three or four glasses of lemonade per week are probably not enough to do much good, however.
HEALTH
April 20, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
On April 9, the biotech company Genentech announced that it was withdrawing its psoriasis medicine Raptiva from the market because it can cause a rare but often fatal brain infection called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or PML. Four cases of the disease have been reported in patients taking Raptiva; all had been on the drug for at least three years.
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