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Psychiatry

NEWS
July 13, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
A delegation of U.S. psychiatrists reported Wednesday that visits to Soviet mental hospitals show that, despite some reforms, the Soviet practice of using psychiatry to punish political dissidents continues. Appearing before a congressional group, the psychiatrists also said that the powerful Soviet psychiatric hierarchy, guilty of past malpractice, remains in place. "Misuse of psychiatric hospitalization in the (Soviet Union) to confine dissidents . . . (has) not yet come to an end," said Dr.
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SCIENCE
July 26, 2008 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
People with otherwise untreatable depression improved in a small clinical trial after receiving continuous electrical stimulation of a part of the brain that scientists believe regulates sadness. A report this week in the journal Biological Psychiatry said 12 of 20 patients with chronic major depression benefited from the electronic device. For seven of the 12, the disease went into remission. The benefits were sustained over the course of the one-year study, researchers said.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the movies, he always has a beard. His patient lies on a leather couch, spouting free associations while he sits in a chair, quietly scribbling mysterious notes. When he speaks at all, which is rare, his vocabulary seems to consist of just six words: "How did that make you feel?" He is the prototypical Freudian psychoanalyst. About 30 years ago, psychiatrist Aaron Beck came up with a different idea.
MAGAZINE
June 5, 1994 | Ann Japenga, Ann Japenga is a contributing editor for Health magazine. Her last story for this magazine was "Grunge R Us," a lament for the disappearing counterculture
Patients walk into Peter Breggin's office and lay their diagnoses on the couch: They're depressed. They're anxious. They're sure they have a measurable, palpable illness, with shape, substance, gravity, consistency. "A little boy came in with his parents and I asked him: 'Do you know why you're here?' " Breggin says. " 'Yes. I'm here because you're the doctor who doesn't believe I should take Ritalin for my ADHD (attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder).'
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
Do you have trouble falling asleep at night? Staying awake in the daytime? Do you sweat too much? Are you hooked on caffeine or tobacco? Do you have irresistible urges to seduce strangers on the street or colleagues at work? Do your children have inexplicable difficulties in school with math or reading? Have you ever felt an uncontrollable need to tear your hair out?
NEWS
November 29, 1988 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Aaron T. Beck's idea was simple: Change the way people think and you can change their lives. Challenge a few unrealistic beliefs, alter some habitual thought patterns, and people will stop being depressed; they will lose their anxieties, kick their drug habits and give up alcohol. Beck called the method "cognitive therapy."
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after 35 years as a psychiatrist, there are nights when Dr. Michael Singer lies awake, fretting over the people of Los Angeles. More and more, it seems to him, their lives are consumed with fears, anxieties, the pressures of a rapidly growing metropolis. Many of Singer's patients are phobia sufferers. Some never go outdoors, living as hermits in tiny tract homes. Others are intensely afraid of increasingly crowded supermarkets, concert halls, banks, freeways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1990 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An elderly Los Angeles man armed with a gun and ropes threw hydrochloric acid on a Santa Monica psychiatrist at his office Tuesday, badly burning him, then died minutes later during a struggle with the doctor, police said. Police described the bizarre incident as a tragic end to a long and bitter feud over the psychiatric treatment of the man's wife. Police said the unnamed dead man, 74, was married to a woman being treated by the psychiatrist, Dr. George Michael Seeds.
HEALTH
May 19, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Hermann Rorschach was not the first psychiatrist to experiment with inkblots, and the origins of his famous test are not entirely clear. But, according to Rorschach lore, he may have been inspired by a 19th century parlor game called Klecksographie, or Blotto, in which participants made ink blots and then described what they saw. As a Swiss schoolboy, Rorschach was reportedly a fan of the game, even earning the nickname, "Klex."
BUSINESS
July 28, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and LINDA DARNELL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Prozac, a depression remedy that has been a star performer for pharmaceuticals giant Eli Lilly & Co., has turned into a sudden liability in the wake of recent lawsuits targeting the drug. Though Indianapolis-based Lilly defends the safety of Prozac, noting that more than 2 million people have taken the prescription drug, analysts worry about the effect of negative news on a drug that is becoming increasingly important to Lilly.
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