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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
John E. Mack, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, died Monday in an automobile accident in London, according to Will Bueche of the John E. Mack Institute in Cambridge, Mass. Mack, who was 74, was in England to lecture at a conference sponsored by the T. E. Lawrence Society and was hit by a car while walking across the street. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Mack's "A Prince of Our Disorder: The Life of T. E.
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NATIONAL
August 9, 2004 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
Since he retired from the Army Reserve seven years ago, Charles Ham's life has taken on a relaxed rhythm: At 67, he sees patients in the cool, quiet office of his psychiatry practice. He visits with his grandchildren. He mows the lawn. So it was a surprise to hear from the Army's human resources command last September: As a former Army psychiatrist, Ham was in a category of specialist both scarce and crucial for the war in Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State officials have levied $54,000 in penalties against operators of Alameda County's psychiatric hospital over alleged lax procedures that may have led to the death of a physician. A citation alleging four violations was issued by Cal/OSHA this week to the Alameda County Medical Center, which runs the John George Psychiatric Pavilion in San Leandro. Dr. Erlinda Ursua, 60, died in November after allegedly being beaten and strangled by a patient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
J. Christian Gillin, 65, a professor of psychiatry at UC San Diego who was also an authority on sleep and mood disorders, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at a hospice in San Diego. According to the university, Gillin focused his work on the antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation. He believed that sleep deprivation was an excellent experimental model for the study of antidepressant treatments and could lead to new, rapidly acting treatments based upon new models of brain function.
HEALTH
June 30, 2003 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Over the last two years, doctors have diagnosed Andrea Robinson with half a dozen severe mental disorders and prescribed her a series of strong medications, including antidepressants and an antipsychotic. Her parents are beside themselves. Andrea is 5 years old. "It's a very difficult situation," Tammy Robinson of Ottawa said about her daughter, who appears to suffer the telltale mood swings of bipolar disorder and is now responding well to a mood-stabilizing drug.
HEALTH
May 26, 2003 | Elissa Ely, Special to The Times
In the last few months, two people in our psychiatric community have committed suicide. They were known as patients to their therapists, but not to us. We knew them as staff. One was a psychiatrist, one a psychiatric nurse who finished his regular shift before killing himself. There is something especially disturbing about the idea of mental health professionals taking their own lives. For one thing, it dispatches the comforting idea that knowledge is control.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
The number of U.S. children and adolescents on Ritalin, antidepressants or other psychiatric drugs surged from 1987 to 1996, a trend some experts say is continuing. The study did not determine whether the youngsters were properly diagnosed and treated. Some experts have warned that American children are being overmedicated. But others say not all youngsters who need treatment are getting it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2003 | MAI TRAN, Times Staff Writer
With rent and home prices skyrocketing, Caroline Findlay has been on the move. Because of the tight housing market, the 26-year-old mother of three and her husband, Mark, had to move about three years ago into her mother's place in Orange, where they found shelter until June, when her mother sold the home. They packed again and moved into a nearby relative's home, where the family of five shares a single room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2003 | Sue Fox, Times Staff Writer
After a six-year federal probe of psychiatric care in the Los Angeles County jails, county officials have agreed to broad reforms aimed at better identifying and treating thousands of mentally ill inmates. The agreement, which avoids a potential civil rights lawsuit by the U.S. Department of Justice, follows years of alleged abuses in the nation's largest jail system, including excessive force and improper use of restraints that led to the deaths of at least two mentally disturbed inmates.
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