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Psychiatry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001
Robert Scheer has again gone off the deep left end of the pier. His July 17 commentary, "Politics 2001: Bush Rules, Gore Drools," is smarmy propaganda of the lowest sort. Setting aside Bill Clinton's personal behavior as merely "juvenile," Scheer says, among a plethora of ranting and frothing-at the-mouth-statements, that President Bush and Republicans are "responsible for the loss of 300,000 jobs in the last three months alone," that "Bush acts as if anointed" and that Bush's tax cut is a "con act," all the while deriding the "foul partisanship" of the Supreme Court, etc., ad nauseam.
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NEWS
September 30, 2000 | From Reuters
Kansas officials said Friday that they would not fight the planned departure of the Menninger Clinic, the renowned Topeka-based psychiatric hospital, to Texas. Earlier this week, Menninger officials said they were negotiating an alliance with a health care conglomerate that would end its 75 years of independence but shore up the clinic financially. Menninger, one of the last independent psychiatric facilities in the United States, would move to Houston and link itself with the Baylor College of Medicine and Methodist Health Care System.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
No scientific figure has permeated the American consciousness--and perhaps its unconscious--more than Sigmund Freud. From Freudian slips to defense mechanisms to the cigars he made more notorious than Monica Lewinsky ever could, Freud's ideas are everywhere. They've shaped the way we see the mind, altered the way we interpret literature and brought talk therapy to the world at large.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
What drives some bodybuilders is a form of mental illness that can be treated with drugs, a researcher says. These people have a type of body dysmorphic disorder, a condition which is characterized by a preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance, said Dr. Eric Hollander of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. "Body dysmorphic disorder affects probably 1-to-2% of the U.S.
HEALTH
December 28, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
We all know them. (Maybe we even recognize them in the mirror.) They are the people who move through life with the weight of the world upon them. Morose, sullen, angry, negative; there are lots of adjectives to describe what has been typically thought of as just an unfortunate personality trait. Now, however, mental health experts are saying that many of these people are chronically depressed.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | Associated Press
A long-awaited prison psychiatrist's report on Theodore Kaczynski was released Friday, detailing the Unabomber's fantasies about mutilating a girlfriend, killing psychiatrists and having a sex-change operation. The 47-page report, compiled in part from interviews with Kaczynski in his Sacramento County Jail cell and from his writings dating to the 1960s, said Kaczynski's frustrated desire for a sex-change operation set him on the path to being a serial killer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1998 | Associated Press
Going to church and reading the Bible regularly may do more than save your soul--they may extend your life. In one of the biggest studies of its kind, Duke University researchers found that people 65 or older who faithfully participated in religious activities were 40% less likely to have high blood pressure.
NEWS
November 15, 1997 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors on Friday unveiled one more apparent contradiction in the personality of Unabomber suspect Theodore Kaczynski: The Harvard-trained mathematician who says he has a phobia about psychiatrists previously appealed to mental health experts for help in battling insomnia.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is little left of the clinical research unit at Camarillo State Hospital that reshaped the world of psychiatric care. Nothing that hints at the work that propelled the treatment of mental illness out of the dark ages of asylums and lobotomies into an era of wonder drugs for schizophrenia and other disorders.
SPORTS
February 11, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So what really caused Oliver McCall to lose not only a World Boxing Council heavyweight title fight Friday night, but also, seemingly, his mind? What caused him to refuse to fight, refuse to defend himself, refuse to even walk back to his corner between rounds? Why did he break down in tears and stroll around the ring as if his opponent, Lennox Lewis, weren't even there? It wasn't drugs in McCall's system.
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