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Psychoanalysis

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NEWS
December 4, 1985 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
Bloomsbury/Freud, the Letters of James and Alix Strachey 1924-1925. Edited by Perry Meisel and Walter Kendrick (Basic Books, $21.95) In terms of literary real estate, Bloomsbury remains a desirable neighborhood but, what with biographies, memoirs and letters, decidedly over-populated. When such things happen, people tend to settle on the fringes. The yearlong correspondence between James and Alix Strachey gives us a kind of Bloomsbury border area: a Holborn or Kings Cross.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Few working filmmakers invite the application of the auteur theory — the notion that some films bear a directorial signature — as frequently as David Cronenberg. The coherence of his body of work is hard to miss. In movies as varied as "Videodrome," "Dead Ringers" and "Crash," he has found myriad ways to explore a recurring set of themes: the thrill and danger of transfiguration, the interrelation of the mind and the body. With these obsessions so firmly established, it is no wonder that many critics and fans watch a new Cronenberg film looking for signs of the old ones, sometimes detecting their encoded presence, sometimes bemoaning their absence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | Dana Parsons
Poor Bill Clinton. Over the next four years, he's certain to be subjected to a punishment unlike that experienced by any President in history. Forget foreign crises. Forget the country's economic problems. The fate that awaits the President-elect will make deficit-reduction seem no more complicated than solving the TV Guide crossword puzzle.
SPORTS
July 12, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
Correctly done, newspapers would send a psychologist to write about the days just before a major golf tournament and a sportswriter to cover the days the golfers play. That's because of Tiger Woods. If anything, the thirst for non-golf analysis of Woods is more acute here than anywhere before, even though this is his third attempt at winning a major title since he returned from what the British press has termed his "dalliances" and his "marital excursions." In his first tries back, he was in the hunt at both the Masters and the U.S. Open, but couldn't close the deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Michael S. Roth
A Dream of Undying Fame How Freud Betrayed His Mentor and Invented Psychoanalysis Louis Breger Basic Books: 148 pp., $22.95 Psychoanalysis has always been a mixed bag, Louis Breger notes. On the one hand, it has produced valuable insights into topics that were previously obscure or even off-limits. On the other, it has generated grand theories that aim to provide universal explanations of human behavior based on little evidence. Breger thinks that psychoanalysis still has something to offer but that it is plagued by an organizational culture that often sacrifices free discussion for personal loyalty.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Few working filmmakers invite the application of the auteur theory — the notion that some films bear a directorial signature — as frequently as David Cronenberg. The coherence of his body of work is hard to miss. In movies as varied as "Videodrome," "Dead Ringers" and "Crash," he has found myriad ways to explore a recurring set of themes: the thrill and danger of transfiguration, the interrelation of the mind and the body. With these obsessions so firmly established, it is no wonder that many critics and fans watch a new Cronenberg film looking for signs of the old ones, sometimes detecting their encoded presence, sometimes bemoaning their absence.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
No scientific figure has permeated the American consciousness--and perhaps its unconscious--more than Sigmund Freud. From Freudian slips to defense mechanisms to the cigars he made more notorious than Monica Lewinsky ever could, Freud's ideas are everywhere. They've shaped the way we see the mind, altered the way we interpret literature and brought talk therapy to the world at large.
NEWS
March 28, 1994
Dr. Herbert I. Kupper, 79, a co-founder and dean of admissions of the Los Angeles Psychoanalytic Institute. Born in Passaic, N.J., Kupper was educated at the University of Louisville, Johns Hopkins University Medical Center and Cornell Medical Center. He treated returning soldiers as a Navy captain during World War II, and pioneered in work on post-traumatic stress disorder. Kupper wrote a book, "Back to Life," about that work in 1945.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2000
As a practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, I was saddened to read "Freud Slips as an Icon of Science" (May 15). Psychoanalysis is very much alive. How else can we explain that the number of psychoanalytic training institutes in Los Angeles that meet national and/or international standards has doubled in the past 10 years? How else can we explain a 1999 article by world-renowned neuroscientist Eric Kandel, in which he claims that neurobiology requires psychoanalysis in order to understand the complexities of human interaction that can account for mental disorder and successful treatment?
OPINION
February 20, 2004
Re "Psychoanalysis Is Dead ... So How Does That Make You Feel?" Commentary, Feb. 18: Todd Dufresne seems to be reveling in the death of psychoanalysis and in the falsity of virtually everything Sigmund Freud had to say. He implies that the 20th century belonged to psychoanalysis. Behaviorists and neuroscientists, who have their own true believers, would grant it the first half. But in the last few decades, unprovable and useless ideas from anywhere have been dropping by the wayside slowly but surely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2010 | Suzanne Muchnic, Los Angeles Times
Louise Bourgeois, an internationally revered artist whose intensely personal work was inspired by psychological conflict, feminist consciousness and a fertile imagination, has died. She was 98. Bourgeois died Monday at Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan after suffering a heart attack on Saturday, said Wendy Williams, managing director of the Louise Bourgeois Studio in New York. Known for sculptures of giant spiders, women with extra breasts, double-headed phalluses and rooms that resonate with loneliness and dread, Bourgeois was a fearless creative force whose work could be disturbing and perversely witty.
HEALTH
January 11, 2010 | By Eric Jaffe >>>
If your doctor advised a treatment that involved leeches and bloodletting, you might take a second glance at that diploma on the wall. For the same reason, you should think twice about whom you see as a therapist, says a team of psychological researchers. In a November report that's attracting controversy the way couches attract loose change, three professors charge that many mental health practitioners are using antiquated, unproved methods and that many clinical psychology training programs lack scientific rigor.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Michael S. Roth
A Dream of Undying Fame How Freud Betrayed His Mentor and Invented Psychoanalysis Louis Breger Basic Books: 148 pp., $22.95 Psychoanalysis has always been a mixed bag, Louis Breger notes. On the one hand, it has produced valuable insights into topics that were previously obscure or even off-limits. On the other, it has generated grand theories that aim to provide universal explanations of human behavior based on little evidence. Breger thinks that psychoanalysis still has something to offer but that it is plagued by an organizational culture that often sacrifices free discussion for personal loyalty.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
In his slyly amusing "Unconscious," writer-director Joaquin Oristrell imagines what the impact of the teachings of Sigmund Freud might be like on a young psychiatrist and his beautiful, pregnant wife in 1913 Barcelona. "Unconscious" is a ribald sex farce of considerable imagination and inspired wackiness and a meticulous period piece of the Art Nouveau era.
OPINION
October 29, 2006
PSYCHOANALYSIS HAS long been a staple of popular culture. Nowhere more so than on the pages of the New Yorker magazine. In honor of Sigmund Freud's 150th birthday, the Skirball Cultural Center is presenting "On the Couch: Cartoons from the New Yorker." Covering nearly 80 years of panels poking fun at psychoanalysis, the exhibit includes about 80 drawings, most featuring couches and neurotic witticisms. The exhibition functions as a kind of cultural timeline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph Weiss, 80, a San Francisco psychoanalyst whose research and theory deepened the understanding of how people change through psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, died Nov. 7 at his home of complications from lung cancer. Weiss' interest in the psychoanalytic process began when he noticed that his mother cried at happy endings of movies instead of during the movie when painful situations were unfolding.
BOOKS
November 13, 1994 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
ON FLIRTATION: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Uncommitted Life by Adam Phillips (Harvard: $19.95; 226 pp.) This is not a joie de vivre book, not a bon vivant, c'est la guerre sort of book. Not a flirtatious treatment of flirtation. Do not be fooled by Robert Doisneau's photograph ("Les Amoureux aux Jonquilles") on the cover. Nor is it sheepish. Phillips does not sidle into the subject crab-wise and guilty. First things first: "To be committed to something . . .
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You stand forewarned: Once you have been indoctrinated with the theory behind "photo analysis," chances are you will find yourself analyzing every photo in sight. Not likely, you chortle? You've heard of palmistry, after all, yet you deftly quash on a regular basis the temptation to read meaning into every hand you shake. Well, photo analysis is different from such age-old occultisms as numerology and astrology.
BOOKS
August 1, 2004
To the Editor: FOR some reason the Los Angeles Times assigned [a review of] my book "Secrets of the Soul: A Social and Cultural History of Psychoanalysis" [July 11] to a historian of 18th century British "lunacy" (Andrew Scull) who has not the slightest feel for such aspects of 20th century Western culture as artistic modernism, the struggle for women's equality, political radicalism, homosexuality, mass consumption, film, advertising, bohemia, the "new Negro," the Harlem renaissance, surrealism and the like.
BOOKS
July 11, 2004 | Andrew Scull, Andrew Scull is the author, with Jonathan Andrews, of "Undertaker of the Mind: John Monro and Mad-Doctoring in Eighteenth-Century England" and "Customers and Patrons of the Mad-Trade: The Management of Lunacy in Eighteenth-Century London."
If Freud is dead, the news does not yet seem to have reached the publishing industry. Month after month, more books are added to the already vast literature on the father of psychoanalysis. One must presume they sell or the flood would have subsided by now, but their audience assuredly lies largely outside the ranks of organized psychiatry.
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