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Psychological Tests

NEWS
April 4, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY and RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The most comprehensive study ever conducted on the effects of day care has found that young children in the care of others while their parents work generally suffer no disadvantage in cognitive or linguistic development. Dr. Duane Alexander, director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which sponsored the study, called the finding that children's cognitive development is not harmed by day care "the most striking aspect of these results."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | MACK REED and DAVID BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Reed is a Times staff writer
Police Chief Randy G. Adams announced clear-cut guidelines Tuesday that could make it easier for city residents to obtain permits to carry loaded handguns. Critics quickly attacked Adams' plan for not going far enough to ease local interpretation of state gun laws, and for making the privilege of carrying a concealed weapon unbearably costly. National Rifle Assn.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995
Question: My son applied to work at a national retail store chain and was given a questionnaire that included this question: "Does it outrage you when criminals get off due to technicalities?" There were other, more straightforward, questions, but what are they really getting at here with that question? Also, the company would not let an applicant take the questionnaire out of the store. Can they do that? --P.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1995 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 18-year-old accused of fatally shooting a Porter Ranch pizzeria manager during a 1993 robbery was ordered Monday to undergo psychological evaluation to determine whether he is mentally competent to stand trial. Dusty Tyrone Castillo's attorney, Jenny Scovis, said her client "is psychotic" and that a psychologist she retained could not interview him because of his condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1994 | SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman charged with torturing and sexually abusing her 10-year-old nephew is mentally competent to stand trial, two court-appointed psychiatrists reported to a Superior Court judge Friday. But at a defense attorney's urging, the judge agreed the woman may be examined by a third psychiatrist before the competency issue is decided. "This case is a picture of insanity," said defense attorney Richard Gilbert. "My client is not able to help me with her defense. She's not able to cope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1994 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge ordered an Orange woman, charged with torturing and abusing her 10-year-old nephew, to undergo psychiatric testing after her lawyer contended Friday that she is incapable of standing trial. * The action came after Cynthia Medina pleaded not guilty to the charges against her in the county's first child-torture case. Criminal proceedings against the 31-year-old woman in Municipal Court in Santa Ana will be halted until the questions of her mental capability are resolved in Superior Court.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting strong concerns about employee privacy rights, a survey released Thursday shows that a vast majority of workers object to psychological tests and other efforts by their companies to pry into their personal lives. The national poll of 1,000 employees conducted by Louis Harris & Associates found that 69% oppose psychological exams that measure attitudes and social preferences, a form of testing that many employers use with job applicants.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | JEFF KRAMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A self-described agitator in the Oakwood section of Venice who recently handed out flyers warning whites they would be targeted by Latino gangs has been arrested for refusing to submit to psychological testing as a parole condition, a state Department of Corrections official said last week.
MAGAZINE
June 5, 1994 | Ann Japenga, Ann Japenga is a contributing editor for Health magazine. Her last story for this magazine was "Grunge R Us," a lament for the disappearing counterculture
Patients walk into Peter Breggin's office and lay their diagnoses on the couch: They're depressed. They're anxious. They're sure they have a measurable, palpable illness, with shape, substance, gravity, consistency. "A little boy came in with his parents and I asked him: 'Do you know why you're here?' " Breggin says. " 'Yes. I'm here because you're the doctor who doesn't believe I should take Ritalin for my ADHD (attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder).'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1993 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the commission hearings for suspended Fire Chief D'wayne Scott ended Monday, his attorney demanded that the embattled chief get his job back while the city's attorney countered that he should submit to a substance abuse test to determine his fitness for duty. Scott, 51, was placed on administrative leave last May when he refused to take a psychological test to determine if alcohol abuse was affecting his job performance as some subordinates have alleged.
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