Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPsychologists
IN THE NEWS

Psychologists

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2013 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
After World War II, social workers typically urged Holocaust survivors to forget their horrific wartime experiences and get on with their lives. That struck Florabel Kinsler as a foolish and impossible order. During a decades-long career, the Los Angeles social worker and psychologist encouraged survivors to speak up about their traumatic experiences. "Flo would never moralize or tell people how they should feel," said Sarah Moskovitz, a Cal State Northridge professor emeritus who collaborated with Kinsler.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
January 19, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Though we profess to hate it, lying is common, useful and pretty much universal. It is one of the most durable threads in our social fabric and an important bulwark of our self-esteem. We start lying by the age of 4 and we do it at least several times a day, researchers have found. And we get better with practice. In short, whatever you think about Lance Armstrong's admission this week that he took performance-enhancing drugs to fuel his illustrious cycling career, the lies he told may be no more persistent or outsized than yours, according to psychologists and others who study deception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
The Riverside boy who shot and killed his neo-Nazi father had a history of violence since he was a toddler, but there was no indication that his father condoned such brutality, a mental health expert for the prosecution testified Monday. Clinical psychologist Anna Salter said the boy, who was 10 years old when he pulled the trigger, told her that his father tried hard to get the boy's violence under control - on occasion beating the child as punishment for an outburst. "He didn't know what else to do," Salter testified during the juvenile court proceeding in Riverside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2012 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Herbert Moskowitz, an experimental psychologist whose pioneering research on the effects of alcohol and drugs on driving helped produce standardized field sobriety tests and pushed policymakers to set lower legal limits for intoxicated driving in the U.S. and elsewhere, has died. He was 87. A former professor at UCLA and Cal State L.A., Moskowitz died Nov. 21 at his home in Encino of complications from leukemia, his son, Ivan, said. With a background in physics as well as psychology, Moskowitz devised rigorous experiments, including the early use of driving simulators, that demonstrated drivers' growing impairment as they consumed increasing amounts of alcohol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | From Los Angeles Times staff reports
R. Duncan Luce, a UC Irvine mathematical psychologist who received the National Medal of Science in 2005 for his pioneering scholarship in behavioral sciences, died Aug. 11 at his home in Irvine after a brief illness, the university announced. He was 87. In 1988, Luce founded and became director of UC Irvine's Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences. He was later named distinguished research professor in cognitive sciences and economics. His work, according to the university, combined formal math models with psychological experiments to try to understand and predict human behavior, including how individuals and groups make decisions.
NATIONAL
July 28, 2012 | By David Zucchino
FT. BRAGG, N.C. - Pvt. Danny Chen, a Chinese American infantryman who prosecutors say was hazed and abused by fellow platoon members in Afghanistan, was scheduled to be moved out of the unit less than two days after he killed himself last Oct. 3, his company commander testified at a court-martial Saturday. Capt. Sean Allred said Chen was to be removed from the unit because he was performing poorly as a soldier and was unfit for combat at the dangerous outpost. Allred said he was unaware that Chen was suicidal or that platoon members were alleged to have been hazing the private and humiliating him with ethnic slurs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In 1970, preschool teachers asked Marin County psychologist Judith Wallerstein how to deal with a rash of children who couldn't sleep, cried constantly or were too aggressive with playmates. The common denominator, the teachers said, was that the parents were divorcing. Wallerstein looked for research on the issue and, finding nothing useful, decided to conduct her own. She launched what would become a 25-year investigation, producing alarming findings that made the long-married grandmother of five a polarizing figure in a contentious national debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
When he heads to the beach from his Santa Monica home, Stuart Perlman wears paint-spattered jeans, a plaid shirt over a T-shirt and a black wool Stetson to shade his bearded face. With one hand he rolls a plastic crate piled high with paints, brushes, a portable easel and a yellow-and-white-striped beach umbrella. In the other, he totes plastic bags filled with containers of homemade pastas and soups, gifts for his "regulars. " Perlman is a psychologist. In his spare time he paints faces - of individuals that most people look past.
SCIENCE
November 5, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Social psychologist Diederik Stapel made a name for himself by pushing his field into new territory. His research papers appeared to demonstrate that exposure to litter and graffiti makes people more likely to commit small crimes and that being in a messy environment encourages people to buy into racial stereotypes, among other things. But these and other unusual findings are likely to be invalidated. An interim report released last week from an investigative committee at his university in the Netherlands concluded that Stapel blatantly faked data for dozens of papers over several years.
NATIONAL
September 29, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge late Wednesday gave prison officials more time to try to restore the competency of accused gunman Jared Lee Loughner, whom a psychologist said had recently shown remorse over the killing of six people and the wounding of 13, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.). U.S. District Judge Larry Burns, who ruled in May that Loughner was mentally unfit to stand trial, extended Loughner's treatment at a federal prison hospital in Missouri by four months. "Measurable progress toward restoration has been made," Burns said during a lengthy hearing in Tucson.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|