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NEWS
September 16, 1990 | MALCOLM GLADWELL, THE WASHINGTON POST
It is a safe bet that few women ever wanted to mother Clint Eastwood. The steely, narrowed eyes. The rugged jawline. The thin-lipped sneer. This is the face of a man to save the homestead from marauding Indians, to stare down an outlaw in a saloon. But not to cuddle. Now, take Paul McCartney--he of the doe eyes, chipmunk cheeks and teddy bear chin. Ten thousand teeny-boppers can't be wrong. The man is adorable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
April 26, 2014 | Chris Erskine
I'm nothing if not a futurist, so as we explore here the nuances of postmodern parenting, we look ahead to what kind of parents our own offspring will one day be: well-meaning pushovers or total tyrants? "I'm going to be such a Nazi," the daughter of a co-worker announces. "I'm going to be the perfect compromise of the two," predicts my older daughter, lovely and patient and - at 30 - eager to start a family of her own. Not even a mother yet, and you can spot my daughter's maternal instincts starting to kick in, softening her feisty, bossy-pants exterior.
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NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Alex B. Berezow
Psychologist Timothy D. Wilson, a professor at the University of Virginia, expressed resentment in his Times Op-Ed article on Thursday over the fact that most scientists don't consider his field a real science. He casts scientists as condescending bullies: "Once, during a meeting at my university, a biologist mentioned that he was the only faculty member present from a science department. When I corrected him, noting that I was from the Department of Psychology, he waved his hand dismissively, as if I were a Little Leaguer telling a member of the New York Yankees that I too played baseball.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Rachel Zoe, stylist, fashion designer and author of "Living in Style: Inspiration And Advice for Everyday Glamour," (written with Monica Corcoran Harel) kicked things off at the Festival of Books on Saturday morning. She was interviewed by photographer, TV personality and friend Amanda de Cadenet before a capacity crowd of 150.  Clad in a black jumpsuit and 6-inch Brian Atwood heels with a 1-1/2-inch platform (the audience asked), Zoe and de Cadenet chatted for 45 minutes.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1990 | MARTIN BOOE
Four years ago, Egan L. Badart was a successful, hard-driving real estate agent. He lived with his family in a 6,000-square-foot home with a swimming pool and an acre of ground in Pasadena. He had assets totaling "a little over $2 million." Then calamity struck. A perforated, cancerous colon incapacitated Badart for more than two years. Inexorably, his business and investments slipped away. He lost it all. The cars, the house, the money--even his family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Rachel Zoe, stylist, fashion designer and author of "Living in Style: Inspiration And Advice for Everyday Glamour," (written with Monica Corcoran Harel) kicked things off at the Festival of Books on Saturday morning. She was interviewed by photographer, TV personality and friend Amanda de Cadenet before a capacity crowd of 150.  Clad in a black jumpsuit and 6-inch Brian Atwood heels with a 1-1/2-inch platform (the audience asked), Zoe and de Cadenet chatted for 45 minutes.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Glenn Beck's Fox News finale was a jaunt down memory lane of Beck's big issues -- from ACORN to what he referred to as "the caliphate" -- and filled with self-congratulation. But, to paraphrase a Washington Post reference to a Time profile on the radio-host-turned-TV showman, was Glenn Beck bad for America? Studies show that when it comes to politics, that brand of angry TV talk show host popularized by the likes of Rush Limbaugh doesn't do democracy or political discourse any favors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
 “A Teacher,” premiering Sunday as part of the Sundance Film Festival, explores the tabloid-ready story of a female high school teacher engaging in an affair with a male student. Rather than a steamy exploitation picture or overwrought melodrama, writer-director Hannah Fidell's film is a taught, closely observed psychological tale. Posters for the film - showing the back of a woman's head with a tight mess of hair coming undone - capture its essence: the exploration of an emotional unraveling.
NEWS
March 10, 1997 | MARY ROURKE
"The Road Less Traveled," by M. Scott Peck, published by Touchstone Simon & Schuster in 1978, this week marks its 690th week on the New York Times paperback bestseller list. But that doesn't mean it's the feel-good book of the decade. This one makes you think. Where pop psychology meets ancient wisdom, Peck has found a voice. A refresher course might read like this: On problem solving: "I and anyone else who is not mentally defective can solve any problem if we are willing to take the time."
NEWS
November 3, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Shop 'till you drop may not apply to e-shopping. Apparently U.S. consumers still prefer -- and will pay more -- for goods they can touch and feel, according to a CalTech study released in September. But some shoppers might get touchy about too much touching. A Los Angeles Times story points out that one expert "agrees that shoppers do feel more connected with products after touching them, but says they usually dig deep into the sweater pile to avoid buying one that's been touched by strangers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
CHICO -- About half an hour after the bus his son was riding in exploded into flames, Mt. Washington resident Gaylord Hill got a call about the crash from a bystander. Hill's son Miles had been put on oxygen, the bystander said, and the 18-year-old was going to be airlifted to a hospital. And that was the last piece of news Hill heard for hours. "I couldn't panic because I had to get the information. After I got off the phone ... sure, I panicked. I broke down," he said. "I called my wife and let her know and then she broke down.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Two psychologically damaged siblings doing battle with a mysterious home furnishing makes for nervy moviegoing in the housebound chiller "Oculus. " The object in question is the Lasser Glass, an ornate, antique black cedar mirror of historically malevolent intentions, or so believes Kaylie (Karen Gillan), whose parents met a bloody, psychotic end a decade ago. Her younger, more emotionally fragile brother Tim (Brenton Thwaites), fresh from a mental facility, is less sure of sis' theory and more intent on moving on from the tragedy.
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Picture potato chips or chocolate - or any food you feel you can't resist. Chances are, your brain associates this food with a promise of happiness, says Kelly McGonigal, psychology instructor at Stanford University. But foods we have little control around act like the elusive carrot on a stick: The more we eat, the more we want. We never feel we have enough because the promise of reward is always in front of us - if only we eat one more, then another, and soon we're left with crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Yet the longing remains.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Child's Pose" sounds like something simple and easy, but don't be fooled. This stunning film from Romania, exceptionally written, directed and acted and winner of the Berlin Film Festival's prestigious Golden Bear, is anything but uncomplicated. A ferocious psychological drama with the pace of a thriller, "Child's Pose" combines, as have the best of the Romanian new-wave films, a compelling personal story about mothers and sons with an examination of socio-political dynamics in a way that is both intense and piercingly real.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo
Many federal programs aimed at preventing psychological problems in military service members and their families have not been evaluated correctly to determine if they are working and are not supported by science, a new report commissioned by the Defense Department says. "A lot of their programs don't have any good data behind them," said Kenneth Warner, a professor of public health at the University of Michigan who led the Institute of Medicine committee that produced the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - By his own admission, Bartlett Sher is not normally drawn to material like "The Bridges of Madison County," Robert James Waller's mega-bestselling 1992 novel. The weepie about a brief but life-changing 1960s romance between an Italian war bride in rural Iowa and a peripatetic National Geographic photographer was adapted into a 1995 film starring Meryl Streep and Clint Eastwood. Now, under Sher's direction, it has been realized as a Broadway musical opening Feb. 20 at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have adapted a standard psychological test that detects underlying prejudices to delve into the minds of psychopathic murderers. Serial killers can be adept at lying and deception, and may turn on the charm to confuse their interrogators. But researchers at Cardiff University in Wales say their test reveals implicit beliefs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1988 | JACQUELINE C. VISCHER, Jacqueline C. Vischer is an environmental psychologist and free-lance writer based in Carlisle, Mass
In 1983, about 100 office workers in Ottawa, Canada, picketed the Les Terrasses de la Chaudiere, a large new government office building, protesting indoor air pollution, uncomfortable offices and, in general, what they described as a poor working environment. Complaining of nausea, fatigue and headaches, they refused to go back to work until the problems were corrected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
A veteran educator with experience in California and Texas was named Wednesday as president of California State University Long Beach. Jane Close Conoley, 66, is currently serving as dean of the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at the University of California Santa Barbara. She will succeed F. King Alexander who left in June to become president and chancellor of Louisiana State University. Her appointment was announced at a meeting of the Board of Trustees in Long Beach. Conoley will be the seventh president at the 65-year-old campus and its first female leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In the midst of television's last golden age, a creepy and effective telling of the infamous Lizzie Borden case blew out the walls of both the TV movie and the historical crime drama. "The Legend of Lizzie Borden" starred Elizabeth Montgomery, who in 1975 was firmly entrenched in American hearts as the sweet-faced, nose-twitching Samantha Stephens from "Bewitched. " To see her as a grimly corseted spinster sweltering under the heat of a New England summer and her family's penny-pinching morality was shocking enough.
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