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NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots Blog
HONOLULU — Synthetic marijuana, known on the street as Spice, can cause a lengthy bout of psychosis in some users, according to research presented at the American Psychiatric Assn. annual meeting. Doctors at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego reported on 10 patients who were hospitalized for psychosis after using Spice. The synthetic cannabis is also known as K2, Blaze or Red X Dawn. The drug consists of plant material coated with synthetic chemicals meant to produce a high similar to marijuana.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2013 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
A woman accused of dropping her 7-month-old son from the fourth floor of a parking structure pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity Wednesday in an Orange County courtroom, a prosecutor said. Sonia Hermosillo, who has been charged with child assault and murder in the 2011 death of her son, was evaluated by three doctors before a judge found her fit to stand trial last year. Her attorney, Jacqueline Goodman, has said that her client suffers from " postpartum psychosis . " Hermosillo drove to Children's Hospital of Orange County on Aug. 22, 2011, and parked her car on the fourth floor of a parking structure, according to prosecutors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1992 | GARY GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A psychiatrist who interviewed Kevin Kolodziej the day after his arrest on murder charges testified Monday that the suspect showed no signs of schizophrenia or other psychosis. Instead, Dr. Donald Patterson said he diagnosed Kolodziej's mental state as a "borderline personality disorder," which the psychiatrist described as a less serious condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams and Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
When Sonia Hermosillo was rolled into court last month in a wheelchair and handcuffs, the 31-year-old La Habra woman accused of killing her baby exhibited signs of the postpartum psychosis her husband says she suffered. She was too distraught and unresponsive, a week after 7-month-old Noe fell or was thrown to his death from the fourth floor of a parking garage, to enter a plea to charges of murder and assault on a child. Her arraignment in Orange County Superior Court has been put off to the end of September, and she remains under suicide watch at the county jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Being a writer of any sort is linked to poor mental health, according to a British psychiatrist. Dr. Felix Post studied biographies of 100 writers and reported in the British Journal of Psychiatry that poets had more mood swings and manic depression requiring hospitalization than authors or playwrights, but they were less likely to die young or be promiscuous. Only 31% of the poets were alcoholics, compared to 54% of playwrights.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frightened by a soothsayer's forecast, Indians by the hundreds of thousands slept out under the stars Saturday, worried that yet another earthquake would catch them and kill them in their homes. The quake that struck Jan. 26, which was among the most lethal in India's history, claimed at least 16,403 lives in the west of the country, left an estimated 600,000 homeless and caused more than $4.5 billion in property loss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1988
Sheryl Lynn Massip is scheduled to be sentenced Friday for the murder of her 6-week-old son, Michael. Massip argued in court that she was driven to kill her son by postpartum psychosis, a malady that is believed to cause severe mood swings, irritability, depression and, in some extreme cases, hallucinations and violence. The 24-year-old Anaheim woman, who ran over her infant with the family car, was convicted of second-degree murder and could be sentenced to 16 years to life in state prison.
NEWS
November 15, 1992
Loud applause for Elizabeth Mehren's recent article calling attention to the negative aspects of programs that serve to aid and abet irresponsible behavior in adults. It's high time someone spoke out against the incredible onslaught of literature and lip service supporting the current vogue of trickle-down psychosis. Although one can readily admit that recognizing a problem is of the utmost importance in solving that problem, a more immediate and healthy solution would be an effort to change negative behavior.
OPINION
June 19, 2002
Thank you for your June 16 article "Jail Suicides Reach Record Pace in State." As usual, The Times is at the forefront identifying and highlighting growing problems before others recognize their existence. The Times' editorials supporting AB 1421 offer a solution to at least one, and probably many other, suicide cases. Instead of releasing Joshua Daniel Lee to continue his slide into severe psychosis, if court-mandated, assisted-outpatient treatment (AB 1421) were available and utilized, his death, his alleged victim's death and many other preventable deaths might have been avoided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1996
"Hatred Often Lurks in the Shadows of Mania" by Dr. Julian Lieb (Commentary, Feb. 16) is an example of misinformation which is presented in an illogical manner and stigmatizes the mentally ill. As a practicing psychiatrist for over 25 years, it has been my experience that those afflicted with manic-depressive disorder (or bipolar disorder, as it is currently named) are no more filled with hatred than the population in general. It is those who have been victims of abuse by parents and society who are most filled with rage and paranoia.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots Blog
HONOLULU — Synthetic marijuana, known on the street as Spice, can cause a lengthy bout of psychosis in some users, according to research presented at the American Psychiatric Assn. annual meeting. Doctors at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego reported on 10 patients who were hospitalized for psychosis after using Spice. The synthetic cannabis is also known as K2, Blaze or Red X Dawn. The drug consists of plant material coated with synthetic chemicals meant to produce a high similar to marijuana.
HEALTH
February 14, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman) dances for a New York City ballet company that is preparing for a production of "Swan Lake. " Stressed out by the competition to be the Swan Queen and smothered by a controlling mother (Barbara Hershey), Nina starts scratching and pulling off chunks of her own skin. She suffers from growing paranoia and startling delusions, including violent and erotic hallucinations involving her competitor Lily (Mila Kunis). On stage, Nina gives stirring performances as both the white swan and the evil seductress black swan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2009 | David Nichols
Insider humor darts about "Insanity" at the NoHo Arts Center. James J. Mellon and Scott DeTurk's new musical concerns a Hollywood schlockmeister who suddenly vows to make world-changing fare, which lands him in a psych ward. If that is not Tinseltown topical, what is? Mellon's libretto follows Zarek Saxton (Kevin Bailey), whose descent into imbalance occurs after we first see him calling "Cut!" on the slasher pic he's helming.
SCIENCE
August 9, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Estrogen may ease the symptoms of schizophrenia in women with severe disease, Australian researchers reported Tuesday in the Archives of General Psychiatry. Researchers started focusing on estrogen's links to schizophrenia about two decades ago when it became clear that female patients typically fell ill an average of about five years after males. Symptoms in women also tend to worsen after childbirth and menopause, when estrogen levels are lower, and ease during menstruation and pregnancy, when hormone levels are high.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Set amid the soulless glass offices of a business machine company in Westchester County, N.Y. -- specifically the milieu of the stressed-out salesmen, desperate to meet their quarterly quotas -- "The Last Time" is a movie that strives for contemporary noir in tone but feels closer to an ineffective parody of James M. Cain filtered through faux David Mamet dialogue.
SCIENCE
February 18, 2006 | Livia Borghese and Jia-Rui Chong, Special to The Times
Western Europe has been preparing for months for the arrival of bird flu, with health officials urging calm in the face of the spreading virus. Apparently, some people weren't listening very well. "The feathered death -- it has landed," blared a headline from the Berlin tabloid BZ. "Bird flu psychosis," was how Italian television channel Rai News 24 described the national mood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1987
Here we go again! Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger releases his department's sixth annual edition of "Soviet Military Power" and announces: "We must realize that we are competing with a dynamic, and an expanding, Soviet military threat." Whenever the Soviet Union spends money on its military the Reagan people call it a "threat." When we spend money on our military, the same people call it "defense." This charade has been carried on by the Reagan Administration until we have been bamboozled into squandering two-thirds of the national revenue on the military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1997
A young mother was viciously executed in a local bank robbery by a new breed of criminal monsters who defiantly describe their predations as "mad dogging." If and when they are apprehended, the police must dance an exquisite, ACLU choreographed, legal minuet around these animals or risk violating their civil rights and winding up on trial themselves. No one is safe anymore, in our homes, on the streets, in our cars, or any place else, from becoming a statistic. The question we must ask ourselves is: What is our tolerance level of national degradation and acquiescence?
HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2005 | Barbara King, Times Staff Writer
Something must have gone awry with the instructions. There can't possibly be a residence here on this Venice street, at least not a three-story concrete contemporary, and brand new to boot. Surely there are restrictions: This is smack in the heart of an old Venice retail and restaurant district, several carefree blocks of mostly low-slung, charm-galore stucco and brick structures. But here's the address, all right, just past a hippie throwback shop in a tiny clapboard bungalow.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The man accused of kidnapping Elizabeth Smart has shown signs of psychosis since middle adolescence, when his family rejected a psychologist's recommendation that he receive treatment for mental illness, a mental health expert testified in Salt Lake City.
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