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Psychotherapists

NEWS
July 4, 1999 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan had been engaged twice but never married. Now she was dating a man who frustrated her, alternately asking for more commitment and wanting to leave her. In hope of winning him over, Susan, a 32-year-old, college-educated grocery store clerk, restyled her hair, dumped her friends and relinquished her hobbies. Susan's therapist listened to her account of the relationship and offered an unusual suggestion: Watch the 1992 movie "Singles," depicting friends in their 20s in Seattle.
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BUSINESS
December 25, 1992 | From Reuters
The government announced final approval Thursday of an agreement with the American Psychological Assn. that could drive down the cost of psychotherapy. The consent agreement settled charges that the APA had curbed competition by barring its members from advertising and seeking patients through referral services. Under the final consent order, the association may not restrict "truthful, non-deceptive" advertising, said the Federal Trade Commission, which issued the original complaint.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The 15,000 psychologists attending the annual American Psychological Assn. meeting here departed Tuesday with a major question looming: Is what they do--talk therapy--becoming less relevant in the treatment of mental health disorders?
BUSINESS
June 18, 2000 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Personal trainer Randi Rotwein used to get frustrated when clients confided their life woes during workout sessions. Compassionate by nature, she wanted to help, but ethically, she had to steer the conversations back to lunges and dumbbell reps. Eventually, though, the 43-year-old Manhattan Beach resident became convinced she'd be more valuable to her clients if she could build their bodies and their minds. So she returned to school and, in 1993, became a licensed psychotherapist.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW
As part of MSN CarPoint's coverage of the North American International Auto Show, resident pop psychotherapist Dr. Will Miller will give visitors to the Web site (http://carpoint.msn.com) a personal car analysis. The site, part of Microsoft's network of Internet services, is the official site of the show, which is in Los Angeles through Jan. 18. Viewers can enter information about their cars--such as the make, model and color--and Miller will analyze what their car says about them.
NEWS
June 19, 2001 | From Reuters
A judge Monday sentenced two therapists to 16 years in prison in the death of a 10-year-old girl who begged for air and screamed for mercy after she was bound head-to-toe in a flannel sheet during a discredited psychotherapy procedure called "rebirthing." Connell Watkins, 54, and assistant Julie Ponder, 40, both sobbed during their separate hearings before Jefferson County Judge Jane Tidball as she pronounced their sentences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
As if the World Wide Web has not already seeped into nearly every aspect of our collective consciousness, now comes an enterprising group of mental health professionals using the Net to delve into our psyches.
NEWS
March 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
A father faced off in court Thursday against his daughter's two therapists, charging that they conned her into remembering childhood sexual abuse that never happened. The lawsuit filed by former wine company executive Gary Ramona is among the first to challenge the validity of so-called recovered memories. Some national experts say the time is right. "There are a certain number of therapists who see sexual abuse in every patient they see," said Dr.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To psychologist and author Michael Yapko, much of what goes on in the name of psychotherapy is "blatantly stupid." First there was Freud's theory of penis envy, then in the 1970s there were nude encounters and LSD therapy. Today, people delve into past-life regression and turn to crystals for help. Some of it "is just moronic," says the San Diego therapist. But Yapko, an expert in memory and hypnosis, says the therapy most en vogue today goes beyond absurdity.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruth Conte, the former actress Ruth Storey who appeared in such films as "Bells Are Ringing" and "In Cold Blood," then went on to become a psychotherapist, has died. She was 84. Conte, who was married for several years to the late actor Richard Conte, died Saturday of cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Born and reared in New York, Storey moved to Los Angeles with Conte and made more than a dozen motion pictures in the 1950s and '60s.
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