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OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Warning: This editorial may upset you," Editorial, March 31 The Times claims, "The latest attack on academic freedom comes not from government authorities or corporate pressure but from students. " That is completely ridiculous. The Times needs to show some real sensitivity to those who suffer every day from post-traumatic stress disorder. You can't even begin to fathom what it's like to live through a traumatic experience that causes these issues. Every member of the editorial board should make it a point to talk to people who have PTSD and gain some critical perspective.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Warning: This editorial may upset you," Editorial, March 31 The Times claims, "The latest attack on academic freedom comes not from government authorities or corporate pressure but from students. " That is completely ridiculous. The Times needs to show some real sensitivity to those who suffer every day from post-traumatic stress disorder. You can't even begin to fathom what it's like to live through a traumatic experience that causes these issues. Every member of the editorial board should make it a point to talk to people who have PTSD and gain some critical perspective.
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NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
It makes sense that a person with post-traumatic stress disorder might have relationship problems, too. And researchers have now found that couples therapy that's designed around PTSD helps both problems. The partner with PTSD reported reduced symptoms, and the couple reported increased relationship satisfaction from couples therapy, researchers reported in the Aug. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. They compared 20 couples who got the therapy with 20 couples who were put on a waiting list for it in 2008 to 2012.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo, David Zucchino and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
KILLEEN, Texas -- This week's deadly shootings at Ft. Hood suggest that after years of trying to confront a mental health crisis, the military is still struggling to design a healthcare system that can identify and successfully treat service members who might become violent. Army Spc. Ivan Lopez had been diagnosed with depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances and was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he opened fire on fellow soldiers and then killed himself at Ft. Hood on Wednesday.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Four letters, "PTSD," have hung over Eddie Ray Routh since the day he was accused of killing Chris Kyle, a famed Navy SEAL sniper, and perhaps a little unfairly so: Kyle probably had PTSD himself. The fragments of information presented about Routh, a 25-year-old Marine reservist, have been indelible thus far. Iraq war veteran. Listless and unemployed. There's Routh: hospitalized multiple times since returning home, at one point reportedly threatening the lives of his family;  also having been found shoeless and drunk by the police.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is a lingering psychological response to a major traumatic event. And researchers studying the condition now have a clue about its development. Hint: Women and men are different. Their study, conducted in part at Emory University in Atlanta, was published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Researchers tested 64 people who had experienced significant trauma in noncombat settings. In women but not men, they found a link between PTSD and high levels of a hormone called pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide produced in response to stress.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For Booster Shots
The toll of a heart attack may be more than just physical. Patients who suffer heart attacks could also suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder -- which could raise the risk of another heart attack, according to a study in the journal PLoS ONE. Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is an anxiety disorder that often develops after a traumatic event involving the threat of injury or death, according to the National Institutes of...
SCIENCE
December 24, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Teens who have been sexually traumatized benefit more from therapy that includes recounting the assault than from supportive counseling, a study suggests. Such exposure treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder has had some success among adults. But it has not found favor for treatment of teens because of fear that it could exacerbate symptoms for young adults who have not developed robust coping skills. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine studied a modified form of the therapy tailored for adolescents.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
The head of the Army 's Madigan Healthcare System, one of the largest military hospitals on the West Coast, has been temporarily relieved of command amid an investigation over whether the Army has avoided diagnosing returning combat soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder to save money. Col. Dallas Homas, a West Point graduate has been administratively removed from his position near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, Army officials announced Monday. Homas had headed the busy medical center since March 2011.  Meanwhile, 14 soldiers who complained about their initial PTSD reviews were scheduled Tuesday to begin receiving the results of a new round of medical evaluations.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo
For military personnel sent to war zones, seeing killing, maiming or dead bodies dramatically increases the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. But researchers studying service members deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq have identified another factor that may raise the risk of those psychiatric conditions by almost the same degree: a history of insomnia. In a study published Friday in the journal Sleep, scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego found that sleep problems before deployment at least doubled the risk for PTSD and quadrupled it for depression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo
It costs about $2,000 to buy an ounce of the illegal drug, the therapist said - enough for roughly 150 doses. She pays her longtime dealer in cash; he gives her a Ziploc bag of white powder. Back home, she scoops the contents into clear capsules. She calls it "the medicine"; others know it as MDMA, the active ingredient in the party drug Ecstasy. MDMA has been banned by the federal government since 1985 as a dangerous recreational drug with no medical value. But interest is rising in its potential to help people suffering from psychiatric or emotional problems.
OPINION
March 5, 2014
Re "Fake service dogs a problem," March 3 As a veteran who served two combat tours, I wish I had been made aware of the recent state Senate hearing concerning service dogs. I would have gladly presented my long-haired chihuahua, who is in fact a service dog. If the committee had taken the time to review the federal government's current policies, it would have seen that comfort dogs are no longer classified as service animals. With some research, the committee would have seen that service dogs come in all stripes and flavors.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
George Zimmerman, the 30-year-old Floridian acquitted last year of murdering Trayvon Martin, says he's homeless, jobless and struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder. Zimmerman made these comments in an interview with Spanish-language television network Univision that's scheduled to air at 7 p.m. Sunday, a week and a half before the second anniversary of the shooting. An English-language translation of the interview was released Saturday. Zimmerman was the neighborhood watch volunteer who encountered the unarmed 17-year-old at a gated community in Sanford, Fla. Zimmerman said he suspected that Martin might have been the burglar responsible for a string of break-ins.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By David Zucchino
TAMPA, Fla. - As an Army sniper in Iraq and Afghanistan, Gabriel Brown craved danger. Combat satisfied what he called his "adrenaline addiction. " When he returned home to Florida, nothing in civilian life provided the sense of invincibility that made combat so alluring and vital. The sniper was now a nursing student. There was a hole in his life, but he found a way to fill it: robbing banks. He robbed with a military flair. On Feb. 5, 2013, Brown whipped out a gun and tossed an M83 military smoke grenade during a robbery of a TD Bank branch in Auburndale, Fla., that netted $19,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Jennifer Percy's debut book, "Demon Camp" (Scribner: 223 pp., $26), is a true story about one American soldier's struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder. By telling the story of Caleb Daniels and his demons, the writer shines a bright light on America's wounded psyche. An award-winning reporter, Percy met Daniels when she was interviewing veterans and their families about their experiences with PTSD, looking to understand their stories in the wake of an alarming rise in suicides among veterans.
OPINION
September 23, 2011
Understandable sympathy for veterans traumatized by war is transforming the conduct of criminal trials. A recent story by Times staff writer David Zucchino reported that post-traumatic stress disorder is increasingly being cited by defense attorneys in arguing that a defendant lacked the intent necessary for conviction of most offenses. The implications for the criminal justice system are significant. Already, 170,000 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans have been diagnosed with PTSD, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
SCIENCE
November 20, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Could PTSD be partly responsible for the nation's obesity crisis? It's an intriguing question, considering that one out of every nine women will meet the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder at some point in their lives. People with PTSD are known to eat and drink things that aren't good for them and to blow off chances to exercise.  PTSD and depression are often fellow travelers, and depression can lead to weight gain. PTSD is also thought to be a risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.
SCIENCE
December 24, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Teens who have been sexually traumatized benefit more from therapy that includes recounting the assault than from supportive counseling, a study suggests. Such exposure treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder has had some success among adults. But it has not found favor for treatment of teens because of fear that it could exacerbate symptoms for young adults who have not developed robust coping skills. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine studied a modified form of the therapy tailored for adolescents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
A man who forced his way into a Reseda apartment Friday night and shot its two occupants -- one fatally -- is a 32-year-old Iraq war veteran who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, Los Angeles police said. For reasons still unclear to investigators, Ricardo Javier Tapia, 32, of Reseda forced his way into an apartment in the 7500 block of Canby Avenue about 6:40 p.m. Friday armed with a handgun, according to police. Police said he shot a man and woman inside, killing the man and critically wounding the woman.
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