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NEWS
November 18, 1985 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
At the dedication of a neighborhood library here recently, with the mayor and other dignitaries looking on, several dozen respectable women quietly raised lollipop-shaped protest signs. "Shame on Us," one sign read. "A Nightmare in Our Dream Building," said another. The women had no quarrel with the library; most of them had twisted aldermanic arms to get it built.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Los Angeles officials are starting to get serious about freeing up $7.5 million or more in city government funds that are earmarked for visual art, performances or other cultural events, but have been wrapped tightly for years in legal red tape. The unspent funds were rendered all but useless in 2007 when then-City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo ruled that the fees developers are required to pay to fund public art had to be spent within a one-block radius of the construction project that generated the fees.
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OPINION
January 27, 2013
Re "Sculpture gets a reprieve," Jan. 24 Where is the common sense of the Santa Monica City Council when it comes to donated public art? The iconic "Chain Reaction" by the late Times cartoonist Paul Conrad hasn't cost the city of Santa Monica a single dime, yet it won't invest the minimal amount of maintenance necessary for such an outdoor sculpture. Could you imagine if the federal government took the same position as Santa Monica when it comes to outdoor monuments such as the Statue of Liberty or the Washington Monument?
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When the city of Los Angeles established its "1% for the Arts" program more than two decades ago, the rationale was that commercial and municipal development takes a toll on the visual landscape of the city. To mitigate that, and to contribute to the artistic vitality of the city, developers were required to pay a fee equal to 1% of the construction value. That money was supposed to pay for art in public places. It was a smart idea to set up the Arts Development Fee Trust Fund. But it's dumb not to spend it. A recent audit by City Controller Ron Galperin found that $7.5 million was languishing in the portion of the fund that is bankrolled by developers and earmarked for public art projects, cultural events and performances.
OPINION
October 29, 2011
For decades, Los Angeles was a mecca for muralists. Lush and bold, murals sprouted like indigenous flora from Boyle Heights to the ocean to South Los Angeles. The themes were as compelling as the muralists themselves — including emerging black and Latino artists — and the neighborhoods that nurtured them. Los Angeles became identified with murals and they came to define the city — Highland Park residents immortalized on a building in that neighborhood, a line of children romping along a freeway wall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2001
There seems to be some controversy surrounding plans to develop public art on wetlands that are part of the Ventura sewage treatment plant. I've seen today's art. That's exactly where it belongs, MIKE HANNIN Newbury Park
WORLD
June 27, 2011 | By Jung-yoon Choi, Los Angeles Times
Perched outside the Posco steel company office, the jarring 30-foot-tall object looks like the remains of a plane crash — all crushed steel and gnarled parts — because that's what it is. Creator Frank Stella built what he considered a modern work of art and named it "Amabel," in honor of an artist friend's daughter who died in a plane accident. But many passersby for years have considered it to be something else: an eyesore. The work is one of the more avant-garde sculptures in Seoul and the symbol of an art controversy in South Korea.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
The city of Cupertino posted an updated version of Apple's proposal for its new campus that includes new details about bike amenities, expanded references to possible public art, and what appears to be a delay in the construction of one part of the campus.  The latter is particularly notable in light of a recent Bloomberg Businessweek article that claimed the campus was far behind schedule and $2 billion over budget.  In the updated...
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When the city of Los Angeles established its "1% for the Arts" program more than two decades ago, the rationale was that commercial and municipal development takes a toll on the visual landscape of the city. To mitigate that, and to contribute to the artistic vitality of the city, developers were required to pay a fee equal to 1% of the construction value. That money was supposed to pay for art in public places. It was a smart idea to set up the Arts Development Fee Trust Fund. But it's dumb not to spend it. A recent audit by City Controller Ron Galperin found that $7.5 million was languishing in the portion of the fund that is bankrolled by developers and earmarked for public art projects, cultural events and performances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001
In reviewing Kevin Sherry's article on Moorpark's new public art piece, I have not been able to locate an artist associated with this project. The article states that Moorpark has an ordinance that requires developers to contribute to the city's public art fund. It appears that an initial design put forward by the developer was considered "abstract and silly looking" by members of the City Council and the assistant city manager. The city then went shopping for a design that would fit its safe-and-sane sensibilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Some of the most colorful art at Coachella this year will be on view outside the music and arts festival. An ambitious public mural project, the first “Coachella Walls,” is underway in downtown Coachella's Pueblo Viejo District. The project, which brings together about a dozen muralists and contemporary artists internationally, has no formal connection to the concurrent, Goldenvoice-produced Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, happening this and next weekends.  Billed as an “arts driven community revitalization project,” “Coachella Walls” was organized by the Coachella-based Date Farmers Art Studios, a.k.a., the artists Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez, who grew up in the area and now show their work at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
It's been a tough go for Florence, the stoic, graceful lady of Lincoln Park. Over the years, hooligans have broken her nose, spray-painted her face, shot at her, ripped off her hands and stolen her lamp. But for all the attempts to deface the statue of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing stands tall and calm in the spot she claimed in 1937, across the railroad tracks from the county hospital. I have to admit that I didn't know the statue was there until I heard from David Colachico, a professor in the nursing school at Azusa Pacific University.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds
I never thought Los Angeles needed an avatar, since so many Angelenos have created new identities for themselves already. But last week, by accident, I wound up in the company of two fine L.A. archetypes, both downtown. Seeing them on the same day persuaded me that they're two of my favorite pieces of public art in Los Angeles. Both were made in the last 20 years and both were designed to give this sprawling, many-tongued city a universal female image who transcends ethnicity. If you have an hour free in downtown Los Angeles, you can walk between them (or take a one-stop ride on the Red Line)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Santa Monica Museum of Art has received a $121,500 grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for an upcoming exhibit exploring art and legislation. "Citizen Culture: Artists and Architects Shape Policy" will go on display in fall 2014 and will examine how public art throughout the Americas can act as an agent for social change. Curated by Lucía Sanromán, the show will feature works by Laurie Jo Reynolds, who led Tamms Year Ten, a grassroots campaign to close the supermax prison in Illinois.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
One of Banksy's most famous graffiti murals could sell for up to $150,000 when it goes on the auction block Thursday. "Love Is in the Air," which shows a masked protester throwing a bouquet of flowers, will be up for bid at Bonhams in London. The Contemporary Art and Design auction will also feature spin paintings by Damien Hirst, a Jeff Koons watercolor and furniture by Ringo Starr. QUIZ: Expensive art on the auction block "Prices for spray-paint canvases by Banksy in our recent auctions demonstrate that his works are more popular than ever with high-profile art collectors," Bonhams contemporary art specialist Alan Montgomery said in a statement.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Contemporary art is going on tour, coming to a city near you. Proving that fashion and art remain the coziest of bedfellows, the Levi's  brand is partnering with multimedia artist Doug Aitken on “Station to Station: A Nomadic Happening,” a new public art project kicking off in New York City on Sept. 6 that will raise funds through ticket sales and donations to support museums around the country. Aitken is designing a train (and cool-looking kinetic sculpture, see rendering above)
BUSINESS
April 25, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
The city of Cupertino posted an updated version of Apple's proposal for its new campus that includes new details about bike amenities, expanded references to possible public art, and what appears to be a delay in the construction of one part of the campus.  The latter is particularly notable in light of a recent Bloomberg Businessweek article that claimed the campus was far behind schedule and $2 billion over budget.  In the updated...
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is the city's other bridge, the overlooked sister to the more beloved Golden Gate Bridge . But that could change Tuesday night. Artist Leo Villareal will flip the switch on his massive art project of 25,000 white LED lights that run 1.8 miles and 500 feet high on the bridge's west span. From dusk until 2 a.m. for the next two years, lights will shimmer with patterns that never repeat, courtesy of a program Villareal wrote for each light on the computer-controlled sculpture.
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