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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As criticism of public television and radio from the conservative right becomes increasingly vocal in this election year, officials in public broadcasting say they are bracing for attacks on the order of those that have been volleyed at the National Endowment for the Arts for the past several years. "I'm prepared for it," said John Lawson, director of national affairs for America's Public Television Stations, public broadcasting's lobbying arm.
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OPINION
February 5, 1995
We thank Sen. Larry Pressler for revealing the real reason behind the efforts of some politicians to scuttle federal support for public broadcasting. Forget all the high-minded rhetoric about privatization and deficit reduction. What is really going on is something like a witch hunt against public broadcasting employees considered too liberal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
On the heels of heated meetings recently with independent producers and public broadcasters in New York and San Francisco, Corporation for Public Broadcasting executives were expecting more fireworks when they brought their roadshow to Los Angeles on Wednesday afternoon. Instead, all but a handful of the 125 or so independent filmmakers and producers in attendance were there primarily to learn more about the corporation's $20-million initiative, "America at a Crossroads."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2006 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
President Bush quietly appointed television sitcom producer Warren Bell to the board of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting this week, overriding opposition from public broadcasting advocates who fear the outspoken conservative will politicize the post.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2006 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
The executive who oversaw the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's $70-million television programming fund has left after three years to return to filmmaking. Michael Pack, the corporation's senior vice president for television programming, said he decided to exercise an option in his contract that allowed him to collect a $500,000 grant for a documentary called "Winning Modern Wars" that his production company was awarded before he took the job at CPB in February 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The loss of a significant miniseries about Latino culture to cable after PBS declined to pick it up has drawn fire from a public broadcasting official charged with getting more Latino programming on the air.
OPINION
May 6, 2005 | JONATHAN CHAIT
Republican hacks are slowly strangling National Public Radio and the Public Broadcasting System. And the liberals who are complaining about it have nobody to blame but themselves. Well, OK, maybe not "nobody." Surely some of the blame lies with the Republican hacks. Let's begin with them, and get to the liberals later. The chief hack in question is Kenneth Tomlinson, the Republican-appointed head of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which controls NPR and PBS.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In 1936, more than 20,000 people crowded around a gallows in Owensboro, Ky., to watch one of the last public executions in the United States. Leaning out windows and perched atop utility poles, they saw a condemned man dangle from a hangman's noose until dead. Since then, executions have been moved behind prison walls, viewed only by select officials, citizen witnesses and the press.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
The House Appropriations Committee voted Tuesday to restore $20 million of proposed cuts in federal funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which provides money to local public television and radio stations. The Bush administration originally proposed to cut about 37% of the federal funding for public broadcasting, and a subcommittee last week proposed a cut of $115 million, or 23%. A net cut of $95 million, if passed by the House and the Senate, would go into effect Oct. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2008 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- Public broadcasting officials vowed Monday to fight drastic cuts President Bush is seeking to make to federal financing for public television and radio, warning that the reductions would seriously impair station operations. Bush's proposed 2009 budget, released Monday, would more than halve the federal allocation to public broadcasting over the next two years, the deepest cuts to the system that he's proposed during his administration. Under Bush's plan, the Corp.
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