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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2010 | By Maura Dolan and Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Illegal immigrants who graduated from state high schools can continue to receive lower, in-state tuition at California's public universities and colleges, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday. The ruling is the first of its kind in the nation. California is one of 10 states that permit undocumented immigrants to receive in-state tuition, which can save them $23,000 a year at the University of California. "Throughout the country, the California court decision will have reverberations," said Daniel J. Hurley, director of state relations and policy analysis for the American Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Steep funding cuts to higher education in California and elsewhere were significant factors in pushing average tuition and fees up 8.3% at four-year public colleges and universities nationwide this fall, according to a report by the nonprofit College Board. California's public universities enacted the highest average tuition increase, 21%, of any state, the annual study on college costs found. The state enrolls a tenth of the nation's public four-year college students. But even excluding California, tuition prices at such colleges rose significantly nationwide this year, an average of 7%, the College Board found.
OPINION
July 6, 2012
With steep increases in tuition becoming the norm, it makes sense that many families would benefit if they were able to predict the cost of a college education for all four years. They could plan accordingly, instead of suddenly facing a bill for several thousand dollars more than they had expected. Yet there are potential downsides to tuition guarantees, which are currently offered by a few dozen colleges. Under the guarantees, the price stays the same for the duration of a student's education.
OPINION
July 18, 2012
Re "Anger grows over GI Bill profiteers," July 16 A friend of mine - a poorly educated, divorced father with no money and trying hard to make ends meet as a delivery person - once told me he had enrolled at a school to be retrained as a computer programmer. An aptitude test would have made clear he was an inappropriate candidate. Instead, the school waived his enrollment fee and arranged a bank loan for full tuition backed by the federal government. He lasted four weeks. Corporate America's aversion to government spending is for money not available to itself.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS and ZERLINE A. HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rising at more than twice the rate of inflation, average college tuition and fees jumped 4% this year and by 5% at private four-year institutions, according to a nationwide survey released Wednesday. Students also are paying 3% to 5% more for room and board, bringing the total average cost to $10,458 a year for public colleges and $22,533 for private ones. Harvard, Yale, Stanford and dozens of other elite universities charge much more, of course.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS and ZERLINE A. HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rising at more than twice the rate of inflation, average college tuition and fees jumped 4% this year and by 5% at private four-year institutions, according to a nationwide survey released Wednesday. Students also are paying 3% to 5% more for room and board, bringing the total average cost to $10,458 a year for public colleges and $22,533 for private ones. Harvard, Yale, Stanford and dozens of other elite universities charge much more, of course.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
American parents give themselves a B-minus in saving for their kids' college educations, a lowly grade that no child would want on his or her own report card. The survey by Fidelity Investments showed that parents have made strides in recent years in financially preparing for college. The problem is that they're still not doing enough in an era of rising costs and crushing student-loan debt. A record 69% of parents are saving for college, up from 66% last year and 58% in 2007, according to Fidelity.
OPINION
September 20, 2010 | By Peter Schrag
The chances that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid can deliver on his promise to move the so-called DREAM Act toward passage in the Senate this week range from slim to none. But the announcement that it would be added as an amendment to the Defense Department authorization bill has energized pro-immigrant groups, even as it underlines the fact that there'll be no comprehensive immigration reform any time in the near future. Not this year, certainly, and probably not next year either.
OPINION
June 8, 2011
Thousands of teenagers living in California illegally were brought to this country by their parents as young children. Some of them have worked hard and done well in school; on both human and practical grounds, it would be wrong to put a college education out of financial reach by requiring them to pay higher, non-resident tuition to attend the state's public colleges. It wouldn't just be bad for the students themselves, who bear no responsibility for their illegal status. The public also loses when it pays for a bright student's education through high school but then does not allow that student to become a college-educated adult capable of contributing more fully to the economy and society.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Karin Klein
I wonder how much time Gov. Jerry Brown spends on California's public university campuses, chatting up students and professors and getting grounded in some reality, before he comes out with his get-tough policies on how they should be run. Sometimes it seems like it must be very little time indeed, if any at all. His latest idea is that state funding of Cal State and the University of California should be tied to how many students they graduate...
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