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NEWS
December 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge ordered Alabama to erase all vestiges of racial discrimination in its public colleges. U.S. District Judge Harold Murphy ruled in Birmingham, Ala., that the state's formula for funding higher education must be altered to help its two mostly black public universities, Alabama A&M and Alabama State. He also directed several mainly white schools to do more to attract black students, faculty members and administrators.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996
It is ironic that the producers of "Chicano!" received most of their funding from the "Anglo" Corp. for Public Broadcasting and the Ford, MacArthur and Rockefeller foundations ("The Chicano Rallying Cry," by Judith Michaelson, April 7). If they had so much trouble finding corporate sponsors, why didn't they approach Spanish-language television and radio networks? What about Latino corporations, businesses, organizations and institutions? If, indeed, there are 30 million individuals of Mexican ancestry in the United States, why weren't the producers able to obtain their financial support?
OPINION
June 14, 2012
Re "School posts may be tough to fill," June 11 Regarding the search to replace three chancellors of public colleges and universities, The Times quotes Scott Himelstein, president of the community colleges Board of Governors, as saying, "I think the governor and Legislature are very clear in not wanting to consider any raises in executive compensation. " It's a great sentiment but I have zero confidence that it will happen. There will be extensive national searches, and when the final candidates are selected, the public statements will say that the salaries offered were justified and necessary to attract the best person for each of these exceedingly difficult and complex positions.
OPINION
June 8, 2011
Thousands of teenagers living in California illegally were brought to this country by their parents as young children. Some of them have worked hard and done well in school; on both human and practical grounds, it would be wrong to put a college education out of financial reach by requiring them to pay higher, non-resident tuition to attend the state's public colleges. It wouldn't just be bad for the students themselves, who bear no responsibility for their illegal status. The public also loses when it pays for a bright student's education through high school but then does not allow that student to become a college-educated adult capable of contributing more fully to the economy and society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Jack Scott, a veteran and popular educator who has headed the state's community college system during a period of brutal budget cuts and was often a voice decrying the impact on students, announced Tuesday that he will retire as chancellor overseeing the 112 campuses. Scott, 78, became chancellor of the nation's largest community college system in January 2009 after a long career as a state legislator and college campus leader, giving him rare insights into both politics and academia.
OPINION
July 18, 2012
Re "Anger grows over GI Bill profiteers," July 16 A friend of mine - a poorly educated, divorced father with no money and trying hard to make ends meet as a delivery person - once told me he had enrolled at a school to be retrained as a computer programmer. An aptitude test would have made clear he was an inappropriate candidate. Instead, the school waived his enrollment fee and arranged a bank loan for full tuition backed by the federal government. He lasted four weeks. Corporate America's aversion to government spending is for money not available to itself.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS and ZERLINE A. HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rising at more than twice the rate of inflation, average college tuition and fees jumped 4% this year and by 5% at private four-year institutions, according to a nationwide survey released Wednesday. Students also are paying 3% to 5% more for room and board, bringing the total average cost to $10,458 a year for public colleges and $22,533 for private ones. Harvard, Yale, Stanford and dozens of other elite universities charge much more, of course.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS and ZERLINE A. HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rising at more than twice the rate of inflation, average college tuition and fees jumped 4% this year and by 5% at private four-year institutions, according to a nationwide survey released Wednesday. Students also are paying 3% to 5% more for room and board, bringing the total average cost to $10,458 a year for public colleges and $22,533 for private ones. Harvard, Yale, Stanford and dozens of other elite universities charge much more, of course.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
American parents give themselves a B-minus in saving for their kids' college educations, a lowly grade that no child would want on his or her own report card. The survey by Fidelity Investments showed that parents have made strides in recent years in financially preparing for college. The problem is that they're still not doing enough in an era of rising costs and crushing student-loan debt. A record 69% of parents are saving for college, up from 66% last year and 58% in 2007, according to Fidelity.
OPINION
September 20, 2010 | By Peter Schrag
The chances that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid can deliver on his promise to move the so-called DREAM Act toward passage in the Senate this week range from slim to none. But the announcement that it would be added as an amendment to the Defense Department authorization bill has energized pro-immigrant groups, even as it underlines the fact that there'll be no comprehensive immigration reform any time in the near future. Not this year, certainly, and probably not next year either.
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