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Public Instruction Jack O Connell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Nearly one in 10 students in the class of 2009 did not pass the state's high school exit exam, which is required to receive a diploma. The results, released Wednesday, were nearly stagnant compared with the previous year. By the end of their senior year, 90.6% of students in the graduating class had passed the two-part exam, compared with 90.4% in the class of 2008. "These gains are incremental, but they are in fact significant and they are a true testimony to the tremendous work being done by our professional educators . . . as well as our students," said state Supt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2010 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Truth is, California's public schools never were all that great. And today, they're not nearly as crummy as critics claim. In fact, they're pretty good, especially given all the problems of funding and diversity. They've always been pretty good ? not exactly A-1, but not failures either. With 1,000 districts, 9,900 schools and 6 million students ? the largest K-12 system in the country ? there is inescapably a scattering of winners and losers. "We're not where we ought to be," acknowledges veteran education consultant John Mockler, a Capitol legend who wrote the complex school finance law, Proposition 98. "But the 'California schools suck' industry is just full of it," he adds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2008 | Jason Song
The state Board of Education unanimously approved a plan Thursday to help 97 school districts meet federal academic standards. The action, submitted by California Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell and endorsed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, mandates different levels of assistance to the districts, ranging from analysis by state intervention teams to districts revising their education plans. All of the districts have failed to meet No Child Left Behind Act guidelines. About a dozen local districts, including the Los Angeles Unified School District, are part of the group targeted by the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
The contest for state schools superintendent has unleashed a battle between unions backing one candidate and charter school advocates and some philanthropists supporting another. Teacher unions line up with state Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) while opposing forces have rallied behind state Sen. Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles). Both liberal Democrats are expected to benefit from sizeable independent campaigns on their behalf for the June 8 election. A third contender, retired school district superintendent Larry Aceves, stands outside that fray, touting his long experience in the education trenches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2009 | Evan Halper
State Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell, a Democrat who had been flirting with a run for governor, says he has opted not to join the race. O'Connell, who is termed out of his current office this year, instead plans to take a break from politics for now. His gubernatorial ambitions had earlier been given a boost by a $1-million campaign contribution from Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings, who has worked with O'Connell on various education issues. "After taking a good look at it, the stars just weren't aligned this time," Rick Miller, an advisor to O'Connell, said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2008 | Howard Blume
The state schools chief joined academics, school officials and labor groups Tuesday in calling on the governor to set aside $3.1 billion to help all eighth-graders succeed in algebra. The call for funding by state Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell comes one month after the state Board of Education sided with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to require that eighth-graders be tested in algebra within three years. In 2007, 52% of eighth-graders took algebra, with 38% testing as proficient.
OPINION
March 22, 2006 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters.
Re "Exit Exam Comes Down Hard on the Class of 2006," March 19 For the last three years, these young people -- about to graduate high school -- have had up to six chances to pass 55% of the questions based on eighth-grade math and 60% of the questions on English at the ninth- and 10th-grade levels. And they still can't do it? What a disgrace! State Sen. Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) is right; we have opened a Pandora's box. But that happened long ago when our educators, parents and politicians decided it was more prudent to graduate students rather than teach them and make them accountable for the education they have been given.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2010 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Truth is, California's public schools never were all that great. And today, they're not nearly as crummy as critics claim. In fact, they're pretty good, especially given all the problems of funding and diversity. They've always been pretty good ? not exactly A-1, but not failures either. With 1,000 districts, 9,900 schools and 6 million students ? the largest K-12 system in the country ? there is inescapably a scattering of winners and losers. "We're not where we ought to be," acknowledges veteran education consultant John Mockler, a Capitol legend who wrote the complex school finance law, Proposition 98. "But the 'California schools suck' industry is just full of it," he adds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
The contest for state schools superintendent has unleashed a battle between unions backing one candidate and charter school advocates and some philanthropists supporting another. Teacher unions line up with state Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) while opposing forces have rallied behind state Sen. Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles). Both liberal Democrats are expected to benefit from sizeable independent campaigns on their behalf for the June 8 election. A third contender, retired school district superintendent Larry Aceves, stands outside that fray, touting his long experience in the education trenches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
One in 10 high school seniors in the class of 2008 failed to pass California's exit exam by graduation, the lowest rate of passage since the test became mandatory to earn a diploma three years ago, according to data released Tuesday by the state Department of Education. The estimated passage rate dipped, state officials said, because for the first time special education students were required to take the exam to receive diplomas, and their test results were included in the tally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2009 | Evan Halper
State Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell, a Democrat who had been flirting with a run for governor, says he has opted not to join the race. O'Connell, who is termed out of his current office this year, instead plans to take a break from politics for now. His gubernatorial ambitions had earlier been given a boost by a $1-million campaign contribution from Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings, who has worked with O'Connell on various education issues. "After taking a good look at it, the stars just weren't aligned this time," Rick Miller, an advisor to O'Connell, said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Nearly one in 10 students in the class of 2009 did not pass the state's high school exit exam, which is required to receive a diploma. The results, released Wednesday, were nearly stagnant compared with the previous year. By the end of their senior year, 90.6% of students in the graduating class had passed the two-part exam, compared with 90.4% in the class of 2008. "These gains are incremental, but they are in fact significant and they are a true testimony to the tremendous work being done by our professional educators . . . as well as our students," said state Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2009 | Seema Mehta and Howard Blume
As California received billions of dollars Friday to stave off widespread teacher layoffs, the state's highest elected education official pledged to reform schools, aligning academic standards with other states, rewarding teachers who work in the most challenging classrooms and improving student assessments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
One in 10 high school seniors in the class of 2008 failed to pass California's exit exam by graduation, the lowest rate of passage since the test became mandatory to earn a diploma three years ago, according to data released Tuesday by the state Department of Education. The estimated passage rate dipped, state officials said, because for the first time special education students were required to take the exam to receive diplomas, and their test results were included in the tally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2008 | Howard Blume
The state schools chief joined academics, school officials and labor groups Tuesday in calling on the governor to set aside $3.1 billion to help all eighth-graders succeed in algebra. The call for funding by state Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell comes one month after the state Board of Education sided with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to require that eighth-graders be tested in algebra within three years. In 2007, 52% of eighth-graders took algebra, with 38% testing as proficient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2008 | Jason Song
The state Board of Education unanimously approved a plan Thursday to help 97 school districts meet federal academic standards. The action, submitted by California Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell and endorsed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, mandates different levels of assistance to the districts, ranging from analysis by state intervention teams to districts revising their education plans. All of the districts have failed to meet No Child Left Behind Act guidelines. About a dozen local districts, including the Los Angeles Unified School District, are part of the group targeted by the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2009 | Seema Mehta and Howard Blume
As California received billions of dollars Friday to stave off widespread teacher layoffs, the state's highest elected education official pledged to reform schools, aligning academic standards with other states, rewarding teachers who work in the most challenging classrooms and improving student assessments.
OPINION
March 22, 2006 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters.
Re "Exit Exam Comes Down Hard on the Class of 2006," March 19 For the last three years, these young people -- about to graduate high school -- have had up to six chances to pass 55% of the questions based on eighth-grade math and 60% of the questions on English at the ninth- and 10th-grade levels. And they still can't do it? What a disgrace! State Sen. Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) is right; we have opened a Pandora's box. But that happened long ago when our educators, parents and politicians decided it was more prudent to graduate students rather than teach them and make them accountable for the education they have been given.
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