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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989
I wish to commend your staff writers and newspaper on the series of articles on public land management or mismanagement ("Public Land, Private Profit: Inside the Bureau of Land Management," Part I, May 21-24). Hopefully, it will remind and bring to the attention of the powers that be locally and in distant Washington, D.C., that remedies are in order to correct many of the abuses. In my studied opinion a good beginning would be to: Enact legislation changing the 1872 mining law to a leasing system modeled after the Canadian system that appears to be working well.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By David Horsey
The right-wing insurrection at the Bundy ranch in Bunkerville, Nev., has taken another weird turn with new revelations about the family history of Cliven Bundy. Bundy justifies his two-decade-long refusal to pay the Bureau of Land Management for grazing rights on the public land where he runs his cattle by claiming his ancestors gained livestock water rights in the 1870s, long before the federal government horned in on the deal. Now, it turns out, that is not exactly true.  KLAS, the CBS affiliate in Las Vegas, checked out the Bundy family's history with the land and found Bundy's grandmother was born in 1901 to parents who had moved a few years earlier from Utah and farmed, not in Bunkerville, but in neighboring Mesquite County.
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BUSINESS
October 5, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Federal officials Tuesday approved construction of the first two California solar energy projects to be built on public land in the sun-drenched Mojave Desert and Imperial Valley. The go-ahead from U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar could bolster the chances for seven other major solar projects in the state awaiting approval from him and the U.S. Energy Department. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is banking on the building boom to infuse the state with more than $30 billion in new investments in green energy and create more than 12,000 high-paying construction and manufacturing jobs from about two dozen planned wind and solar facilities.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and John M. Glionna
Fearing for their safety as armed protesters gathered in the Nevada back country, federal officials on Saturday suddenly ended a controversial effort to seize hundreds of cattle that a rancher has kept illegally on public land. The cattle ranch's owner, Cliven Bundy, and hundreds of armed supporters had threatened to forcefully keep Bureau of Land Management employees from rounding up the approximately 900 cattle. Nearly 400 of the cattle had been seized during the past week. They were being held nearby and could be sent to Utah, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999
"The Great American Oil Rip-Off" (editorial, July 20) confuses two separate issues. The litigation in which California and a number of public-land drillers have been engaged is a disagreement about whether oil companies complied with the law, and it is a matter for the courts to decide. At the heart of the matter is congressional intent to keep a federal regulatory agency from rewriting federal royalty laws that date back to 1920. The Department of the Interior has repeatedly sought to change the basis by which royalties are established.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Poor Bruce Babbitt. The Secretary of Interior was twice a contender for an Associate Supreme Court Justice position but remained in his current post because of his value to President Bill Clinton. But his current job means that he must forever contend with one of the country's most unbending, virulent interest groups: Business people who make money off of Western lands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1991
Residents are fond of the California coastline, and they want to protect it. Of all the lands in public ownership, the vulnerable shoreline has a unique power to rally residents to fight any threat--either to the beachfront or to public access. In recent days, that point was brought home in three different locales along the Southern California shoreline off Pacific Coast Highway. It ought to be very simple but sometimes isn't: Public land is public land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1991 | Editor's note: The Orange County Board of Supervisors last week gave up claim to land near Trabuco Canyon that had been designated as open space but on which a developer had built 21 homes. These letters represent readers' reaction to the building of these homes on open space
It boggles the mind: An engineering company, a title company and a developer, plus county officials, are all unaware that houses were to be built on public land. To "help" the developer, the Board of Supervisors (gave) up this public land. Considering that Hunsaker made a similar error in Laguna Niguel, it would appear that their engineers are unusually inept or deliberately ignore verification. A title company whose title clearance was meaningless? As an Orange County taxpayer, I wonder if there is any connection between this apparent appropriation of public land by developers and the supervisors' decision to "give" this land to them and the articles a few days ago in The Times indicating that the supervisors' campaigns are largely funded by real estate developers.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Salt Lake City ruled the U.S. Bureau of Land Management can close 250,000 acres of public land near Moab to off-road vehicles, including the popular Factory Butte area. U.S. District Judge Bruce Jenkins said the BLM had the power to prevent or reduce environmental damage. Jenkins threw out a lawsuit from the Utah Shared Access Alliance, which said the BLM acted in 2001 without taking public comment or holding hearings.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2008 | The Associated Press
The slumping economy and high energy costs are prompting a significant increase in the number of people seeking permits to cut their own firewood on public land, federal land managers said. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Carson City District sold more than 75 firewood permits over three days last week, an increase of at least 25% from what would normally be expected, agency spokesman Mark Struble said. "That's quite a bit for October," Struble told the Reno Gazette-Journal.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Nevada's governor and one of its U.S. senators have joined a chorus of criticism of a month-long federal government roundup of a recalcitrant rancher's 900 cattle that for decades have grazed on hundreds of thousands of acres of public lands near here. Gov. Brian Sandoval said in a statement that his office has received numerous complaints about the operation by the Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service to collect cattle belonging to southern Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who for decades has refused to pay the required fees to graze his animals on public land.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
Federal officials have announced the approval of two solar projects on public land in California and Nevada. The projects are expected to generate about 550 megawatts of renewable energy, or enough to power about 170,000 homes, the Interior Department said in a statement Wednesday. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the two projects are among 50 such utility-scale renewable proposals that have been approved by the department since 2009. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America The Stateline Solar Farm Project will be built in San Bernardino County about two miles south of the Nevada border.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
A plan to double film permit fees on public lands has produced a rare moment of bipartisanship in Washington. Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) joined more than 50 other representatives from both sides of the aisle this week, sending a letter to the U.S. Department of Interior and Department of Agriculture requesting that fees for filming on public lands not be increased. The departments, squeezed by budget cuts, are considering a plan that would double filming fees. On the set: movies and TV Cardenas and a bipartisan group of representatives contend the higher fees would drive more production out of the country.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON -- Just as Interior Secretary Sally Jewell started her job in April, her department was faced with across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration. Then there was the 16-day partial government shutdown last month, where the National Park Service took heat from Congress and the public for shuttering parks and monuments. The shutdown served as a reminder of "what's at stake" for America's public lands, Jewell told a group Thursday at the National Press Club, where she highlighted the importance of a conservation legacy amid budget cuts, tensions between development and conservation, and climate change.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Utility-scale solar plants have been given priority over mining claims on federal lands, according to a decision announced Friday. The federal Bureau of Land Management withdrew more than 300,000 acres of federal land in six Western states from eligibility for new mining claims in an effort to preserve the land for commercial-scale solar energy development. The decision, published in the Federal Register, formalizes an earlier announcement to prohibit new claims for the next 20 years on public land previously identified for solar development in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah.
SCIENCE
February 6, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Saying that President Obama is lagging behind even some of his Republican predecessors in protecting public lands, former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt is urging the administration to put more federal land off limits to energy and other resource development. In a speech Tuesday at the National Press Club in Washington, Babbitt, head of the Interior Department under President Clinton, pointed out that during Obama's first term, the administration leased more than twice as much federal acreage for gas and oil development than was protected as wilderness.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama nominated a former petroleum engineer and commercial banker who is also a conservationist and chief executive of an environmentally conscious retailer to lead the Interior Department on Wednesday, making an unorthodox selection for his first female nominee to his second-term Cabinet. Sally Jewell, president and chief executive of Recreational Equipment Inc., has no government credentials and little public policy experience. But her resume could appeal to the feuding interests that drive much of the debate at the department in charge of managing federal lands: the oil and gas extraction industries seeking access to public land and the environmentalists seeking preservation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2013 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
The Annenberg Foundation plans to build a $50-million interpretive center in the Ballona Wetlands Ecological Reserve under an agreement to be signed Monday with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Officials aim to make the center a place for people to "come to learn how nature works and how each of them is a part of it," said Charlton H. "Chuck" Bonham, Fish and Wildlife director. The announcement marked rare movement in the state's efforts to restore one of Southern California's few remaining wetlands and open it to the public.
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