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NATIONAL
October 31, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON -- Just as Interior Secretary Sally Jewell started her job in April, her department was faced with across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration. Then there was the 16-day partial government shutdown last month, where the National Park Service took heat from Congress and the public for shuttering parks and monuments. The shutdown served as a reminder of "what's at stake" for America's public lands, Jewell told a group Thursday at the National Press Club, where she highlighted the importance of a conservation legacy amid budget cuts, tensions between development and conservation, and climate change.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Militant Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy on Friday apologized for his comments published this week on African Americans and slavery but refused to back off from his intended point that the federal government was too powerful, saying that his remarks came “from the heart.” In a daily news conference from his ranch in Bunkerville, north of Las Vegas, the 67-year-old rancher, who is in a prolonged battle with federal officials over grazing rights...
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SCIENCE
February 6, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Saying that President Obama is lagging behind even some of his Republican predecessors in protecting public lands, former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt is urging the administration to put more federal land off limits to energy and other resource development. In a speech Tuesday at the National Press Club in Washington, Babbitt, head of the Interior Department under President Clinton, pointed out that during Obama's first term, the administration leased more than twice as much federal acreage for gas and oil development than was protected as wilderness.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996
We are grateful to The Times for mentioning the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund in your Nov. 4 editorial. Regrettably, hardly anyone knows about this excellent program, which helps consolidate our national parks and other priceless public lands that are so valuable to America's future. Lack of public awareness of the LWCF allows Congress to divert these special funds from their rightful purpose without the angry outcry that might otherwise be heard. Nearly $1 billion is collected annually from offshore oil revenue specifically for public lands, but only a paltry 15% gets used as authorized.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2012 | By Julie Cart
Energy development on public lands and waters pumped more than $12 billion into federal coffers in 2012, $1 billion more than the previous year, according to the U.S. Department of the Interior. "These revenues reflect significant domestic energy production under President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy and provide a vital revenue stream for federal and state governments and American Indian communities," Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said in a statement. Money from the extraction of oil, gas and coal from federal land is divvied up several ways, including substantial deposits into the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which purchases land to set aside for conservation.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Utility-scale solar plants have been given priority over mining claims on federal lands, according to a decision announced Friday. The federal Bureau of Land Management withdrew more than 300,000 acres of federal land in six Western states from eligibility for new mining claims in an effort to preserve the land for commercial-scale solar energy development. The decision, published in the Federal Register, formalizes an earlier announcement to prohibit new claims for the next 20 years on public land previously identified for solar development in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
A plan to double film permit fees on public lands has produced a rare moment of bipartisanship in Washington. Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) joined more than 50 other representatives from both sides of the aisle this week, sending a letter to the U.S. Department of Interior and Department of Agriculture requesting that fees for filming on public lands not be increased. The departments, squeezed by budget cuts, are considering a plan that would double filming fees. On the set: movies and TV Cardenas and a bipartisan group of representatives contend the higher fees would drive more production out of the country.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
Federal officials have announced the approval of two solar projects on public land in California and Nevada. The projects are expected to generate about 550 megawatts of renewable energy, or enough to power about 170,000 homes, the Interior Department said in a statement Wednesday. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the two projects are among 50 such utility-scale renewable proposals that have been approved by the department since 2009. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America The Stateline Solar Farm Project will be built in San Bernardino County about two miles south of the Nevada border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
CADIZ, Calif. - Three decades ago a group of businessmen pored over NASA satellite imagery as part of a worldwide hunt for large groundwater reserves they could tap to grow desert crops. They found the signs they were looking for here in the sun-blasted mountain ranges and creosote-freckled valleys of the Mojave Desert, 200 miles east of Los Angeles. The group, which founded Cadiz Inc., bought old railroad land, drilled wells and planted neat grids of citrus trees and grapevines, irrigating them with water that bubbled out of the desert depths at the rate of 2,000 gallons a minute.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
Federal officials have announced the approval of two solar projects on public land in California and Nevada. The projects are expected to generate about 550 megawatts of renewable energy, or enough to power about 170,000 homes, the Interior Department said in a statement Wednesday. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the two projects are among 50 such utility-scale renewable proposals that have been approved by the department since 2009. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America The Stateline Solar Farm Project will be built in San Bernardino County about two miles south of the Nevada border.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2013 | By Shan Li
While the country has enjoyed an oil and natural gas boom thanks to new technologies, the Interior Department has failed to keep up and raise royalty rates to maximize revenue on public lands, according to government auditors. That's especially a problem for onshore drilling, where "Interior officials are currently unable to make timely adjustments to royalty rates," a report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office said. The Bureau of Land Management, for example, didn't go through with plans last year to bump royalty rates on public lands to 18.75% from 12.5%, the report said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
A plan to double film permit fees on public lands has produced a rare moment of bipartisanship in Washington. Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) joined more than 50 other representatives from both sides of the aisle this week, sending a letter to the U.S. Department of Interior and Department of Agriculture requesting that fees for filming on public lands not be increased. The departments, squeezed by budget cuts, are considering a plan that would double filming fees. On the set: movies and TV Cardenas and a bipartisan group of representatives contend the higher fees would drive more production out of the country.
SCIENCE
October 31, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Interior Secretary Sally Jewell on Thursday called on Congress to move past partisan bickering and fully fund the nation's parks and wildlife refuges, invoking Teddy Roosevelt's call to conservation as a "moral issue. " Delivering her first major address in a speech at the National Press Club in Washington, Jewell chided lawmakers who support the partial government shutdown then criticized the National Park Service for closing cherished monuments. “The real test of whether you support conservation is not what you say in a press conference when the cameras are rolling,” she said, “but whether you fight for it in the budget conference.” Jewell took office in April and faced a 5% across-the-board sequestration cut in the budgets of the agencies she oversees.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON -- Just as Interior Secretary Sally Jewell started her job in April, her department was faced with across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration. Then there was the 16-day partial government shutdown last month, where the National Park Service took heat from Congress and the public for shuttering parks and monuments. The shutdown served as a reminder of "what's at stake" for America's public lands, Jewell told a group Thursday at the National Press Club, where she highlighted the importance of a conservation legacy amid budget cuts, tensions between development and conservation, and climate change.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS  - A major government critic of the Bureau of Land Management's treatment of wild horses in the West was in Nevada on Wednesday to inspect an agency corral housing 1,500 mustangs recently rounded up from federal range land. Arizona Rep. Raul M. Grijalva, the top Democrat on a congressional panel on public lands, is taking a tour with several animal advocates for a up-close view of a program that has divided activists and federal officials in 10 states across the West. “The congressman has been tracking the wild horse and burro issue for pretty much the entire time he's been on committee, over the last 10 years,” Brandon Bragato, a senior legislative assistant for the congressman, told the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
September 9, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy
At Utah's 1.9-million acre Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, the issue du jour is who controls the remote dirt roads popular with hikers. In August, a Kane County commissioner and the local sheriff pulled up 31 signs installed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management that banned ATVs and motorcycles. Commissioner Mark Habbeshaw said too many BLM restrictions were being placed on residents. "We need to rely on public access," he said. "Instead, we're being treated like a national park."
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
President Wilson on Aug. 25, 1916, created a National Park Service that would "... conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and wild life therein, and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for future generations. " Ninety-seven years later, the system has grown to oversee more than 84 million acres of public lands. To mark Founders Day on Sunday, parks across the nation will waive entrance fees. The deal: In addition to free entrance, many parks have special free events planned too. --At Theodore Roosevelt National Park , the "president" will show up between 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. local time at the South Unit Visitor Center in Medora, N.D. -- Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, will host events on culture and natural diversity all day at the park's visitor center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- The National Park Service said it needs five more months to finish a plan to "protect and enhance" the Merced River, which runs for 81 miles inside Yosemite National Park The park service is facing criticism for proposing to eliminate some popular tourist amenities in Yosemite, including bike and raft rentals, swimming pools, a snack stand, an ice-skating rink and some hiking trails Kathleen Morse, the park's chief of planning, said...
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