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Public Nuisances

NEWS
February 7, 1997 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing impatient with a politically connected nonprofit organization's failure to repair earthquake-damaged buildings in a North Hills neighborhood, city inspectors have cited three structures as public nuisances and ordered the owners to fix the problems within 30 days.
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BUSINESS
January 11, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twin Palms restaurant in Newport Beach, which has been involved in a running battle with the nearby Four Seasons hotel over noise, has closed its doors to the public and will shut down permanently at the end of the month. The trendy French bistro, which featured live music that drew complaints from hotel guests, will be open only for private parties until it vacates the site Jan. 31, the restaurant said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
An Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Thursday that one man's castle may still be his home, granting Haym Ganish's request for a temporary injunction to block the city's planned Nov. 10 demolition of his castle-like dwelling. After 12 years of alternately remodeling his home and battling city officials, Ganish won a reprieve from the impending destruction of what his neighbors call the "Kron Street castle." Judge Nancy Wieben Stock ordered both Ganish and the city to return to court Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two years after the Northridge earthquake, nearly 400 quake-damaged buildings in Los Angeles remain vacant and unrepaired, demonstrating the lingering effects of the nation's most expensive disaster. In quiet residential neighborhoods and busy commercial strips, the buildings continue to deteriorate under the destructive forces of weather, vandals and vermin, creating eyesores and health hazards for neighbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1997 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A North Hills community organization, facing intense pressure from city inspectors to repair three of its earthquake-damaged apartment buildings or have them declared public nuisances, won another reprieve Tuesday. The Los Angeles Building and Safety Commission rejected city inspectors' request that two of the buildings be declared nuisances because they had become havens for drug users, gang members and prostitutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1997 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A politically connected developer who has failed to complete repair work in one of the San Fernando Valley areas most severely damaged by the 1994 Northridge earthquake got another break Tuesday. The Los Angeles Building and Safety Commission postponed acting on city inspectors' request that it declare as public nuisances three quake-damaged buildings owned by Neighborhood Empowerment and Economic Development (NEED).
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | STEPHEN BROWN, REUTERS
Sick of body odor on subway trains and chain smokers in restaurants? Had your car boxed in by double parking or a good film ruined by the couple in front chatting? Fed up with litterbugs and road hogs? Take heart. In Portugal at least, slobs and other public nuisances are getting their wrists slapped by a government television campaign telling them to mind their manners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1996 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years ago, when the Pasadena Police Department set up its shooting range in Eaton Canyon Park, the only grumblers would have been the deer and coyotes that populated the foothill area. Times have changed. The shooting range has not. With houses now on surrounding hillsides--and hikers everywhere--the proximity of the officers, their guns and their bullets is making neighbors downright uptight. If the bam! bam! bam!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Grand Jury's call earlier this year for cities, school districts and the county to ban leaf blowers appears to be more hot air than substance, with spotty enforcement and few citations to show for the effort. The report found that gas-powered blowers emit toxic fumes, create high-velocity winds that whip dust and pollutants into the air and generate noise that endangers the operators and bothers residents.
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