Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPublic Opinion
IN THE NEWS

Public Opinion

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1993
As gang violence increases from San Clemente to La Habra, gangs have become a growing concern throughout Orange County and a Priority for police and the district attorney's office. Gangs of all kinds operate within the county. Some are so-called "territorial" or "turf" gangs, whose members believe they control specific areas; others are considered "nomadic," operating in various places in he county with no special turf. Some are considered violent; some are not.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 2, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - The headline news on state-run Chinese Channel 13 was juicy: A mining tycoon and 35 others had been charged with running a mafia-style enterprise in Sichuan province, gunning down enemies in the street, bribing people and operating an illegal casino. But viewers didn't have to just listen to police or prosecutors describe the evidence against the three dozen suspects: CCTV aired extensive clips of many of them, dressed in blue jailhouse jackets, admitting their misdeeds.
Advertisement
OPINION
September 21, 2013
Re "'This is the line in the sand,' House Republicans say," Sept. 19 Paraphrasing Mark Twain, there are lies, damned lies and statistics. The Republicans are distorting the facts on public support for Obamacare. The September Pew Research poll shows that 53% disapprove of Obamacare, while 42% approve. What Republicans are not saying is that, according to a May CNN poll, more than a quarter of those disapproving are opposed because the law does not go far enough. The Pew poll also reports that about half of the 53% who disapprove of the law (27% overall)
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
It's been a rough few weeks for public employee unions. First, a federal judge in the Detroit bankruptcy case ruled the city's public employee pensions could be cut just like any other debt, challenging the belief that the retirement benefits were untouchable. Now, a new Field Poll finds Californians are souring on labor unions. The state has traditionally been fairly pro-organized labor, but there's been a marked decline in public opinion over the last two years, according to the independent survey of 1,000 voters.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Paul West and David Lauter
WASHINGTON -- In the nearly four and a half years since California voters approved Proposition 8, banning same-sex marriages in the state, public attitudes on the subject have gone through a remarkably rapid transformation. Nationally, 1 in 7 American adults said in a recent Pew Research Center survey that they had changed their minds about same-sex marriage. Nearly all had gone from opposing legal marriage for same-sex couples to supporting it. Having a friend or family member who is gay was the most common reason for having switched positions, the poll found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992
I applaud The Times for its "Media Impact" series (by David Shaw, Oct. 25-27), a refreshingly candid exploration of journalism's role in shaping public opinion, and--perhaps even more importantly--the role of perceived public opinion in shaping the nature and scope of news coverage by the media. Perhaps the public's seeming lack of interest in the Iraqgate revelations is at least partially due to the failure of reporters to clearly draw the connections between our government's foreign policy, military adventures, and the painful financial woes of those for whom "I need a job, I need money" are the urgent issues of the day. A whole lot of taxpayer money was involved in arming Saddam Hussein and then fighting him in the Gulf War. The ones who came out ahead were the high-technology manufacturers and weapons builders that supplied both sides, not the U.S. citizens who are stuck with paying for everything.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Public opinion on marriage for gay and lesbian couples has shifted with almost unprecedented speed since California voters banned such unions in 2008. That shift could influence the Supreme Court, in particular Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and possibly Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., as it decides whether to uphold Proposition 8 in coming months. Throughout his long career, Kennedy has been willing to make major changes in the law on issues including the death penalty, gun rights and gay rights.
OPINION
June 5, 2011
Looking at Liu Re "Impaired judgment," Opinion, June 1 There is a reason that attacks like those made on Goodwin Liu, who recently asked that his nomination to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals be withdrawn, are called "Borking. " This horrible process began with the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's bizarre attack on Robert Bork, a recognized constitutional scholar whom President Reagan nominated to the Supreme Court. Ever since then, federal court nominees have been targeted by ideological opponents of the administration nominating them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1986 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.) told delegates to the National Governors Assn. Sunday that it was a shame they couldn't be home watching television, for they were missing fascinating coverage of the Philippine rebellion. Indeed, in recent days Americans have seen a rare video docudrama, a revolution. Since last November, both sides in the Philippines have played out their conflict on the evening news in the United States, on morning talk shows and on late-night programs.
SPORTS
February 24, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
So much for the dust-up over National League most valuable player Ryan Braun's testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs and potentially forfeiting the award to the Dodgers' Matt Kemp, who finished second in the voting. Braun's positive test result and the 50-game suspension that went with it were thrown out Thursday by baseball arbitrator Shyam Das, clearing the former Granada Hills High standout to play for the Milwaukee Brewers on opening day in April. It marked the first time a baseball player has successfully challenged a drug-related penalty in a grievance.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Good news, President Obama: Americans support the Affordable Care Act, as Jimmy Kimmel showed Tuesday night. The bad news: They hate Obamacare. Of course, we all know that "Obamacare" is the pejorative shorthand for the Affordable Care Act, Obama's 2010 healthcare reform law being held ransom by House Republicans who cite the American people's dislike of the legislation as their reason for bringing much of the federal government to a halt. Correction: As Kimmel showed , some of us know.
OPINION
September 24, 2013 | By Bruce Ackerman
We are in the midst of the first serious reexamination of government spying since the 1970s. President Obama has asked a special review panel for initial recommendations by November. The normally secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, also known as the FISA court, has broken new ground by publishing a full-dress opinion upholding the collection of massive amounts of data on domestic telephone conversations. With James R. Clapper, director of national intelligence, all but conceding that there was a "good side" to Edward Snowden's leaks, we can expect significant actions by the courts and the executive.
OPINION
September 21, 2013
Re "'This is the line in the sand,' House Republicans say," Sept. 19 Paraphrasing Mark Twain, there are lies, damned lies and statistics. The Republicans are distorting the facts on public support for Obamacare. The September Pew Research poll shows that 53% disapprove of Obamacare, while 42% approve. What Republicans are not saying is that, according to a May CNN poll, more than a quarter of those disapproving are opposed because the law does not go far enough. The Pew poll also reports that about half of the 53% who disapprove of the law (27% overall)
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - With support for the war in Vietnam sagging and mass protests erupting around the nation, President Nixon invited cameras into the Oval Office in November 1969 and spoke directly to Americans. Seated behind a desk, reading from a prepared text, Nixon explained why an immediate withdrawal would be a blow to freedom and democracy, outlined a plan "to end the war in a way that we could win the peace" and promised to turn over much of the fighting to Vietnamese troops. Playing to mainstream America's patriotism and its skepticism of the counterculture, he concluded, "And so tonight - to you, the great silent majority of my fellow Americans - I ask for your support.
WORLD
September 2, 2013 | Tracy Wilkinson and Richard Fausset
When President Enrique Pena Nieto delivers his first state of the union message Monday, he won't leave home to do it. The unusual venue -- his residence, Los Pinos -- is replacing the more traditional spot, the presidential National Palace, because striking teachers have laid siege to the plaza surrounding it. Government officials and invited dignitaries would have a tough time reaching the palace. Nine months into Pena Nieto's presidency, not everything is going quite according to his well-choreographed, carefully hyped plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2013 | Christine Mai-Duc
Mike Collins was raised in oil country but dreamed of living at the beach. As a young boy in Bakersfield, he accompanied his father to dusty fields dotted with derricks where he repaired the motors on oil rigs. On his bedroom wall hung a poster of a house perched atop a cliff, overlooking the ocean waves. "Justification for higher education," his mother called it. Now a psychologist, Collins bought his dream house four blocks from the seashore in tiny Hermosa Beach nearly five years ago. He surfs or paddleboards daily and often rides his bicycle to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | James Rainey and Mark Z. Barabak
The vibe had to feel familiar to Arnold Schwarzenegger. Crowds flocked to his nationwide tour. A head of state staged a joint photo op, then sat for a little policy chitchat over breakfast. "Buff, bronzed and presidential" one news site declared of California's erstwhile governator, adding that he "has his sights set on the Oval Office. " There's no chance of that right now, owing to the constitutional ban on immigrants becoming president. Still, Schwarzenegger's recent environmental tour reanimated, in a small way, the elation of 2003, when he swept into the governor's office in an unprecedented recall election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison, Abby Sewell and Angel Jennings
Pastor Jim Franklin was one of the leading voices supporting California's 2008 gay marriage ban. He spoke passionately about the importance of traditional marriage from the pulpit of Cornerstone Church in Fresno and led rallies against gay unions. Five years later, the epic battle appears to have ended when the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to decide the merits of the case on the grounds that the sponsors of Proposition 8 did not have the legal right to bring the appeal.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|