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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2005 | William Nottingham, Times Staff Writer
So how do you really feel about abortion? Immigration, the economy or Iraq? Or the president? Or the governor? With the fall election season heating up in California and other states, public opinion pollsters will be asking questions on such topics to thousands of people in a drive to pin down the ever-shifting mood of the country. As Los Angeles Times Poll Director Susan Pinkus explains below, obtaining a valid result involves a keen blend of art and science.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
A lot of concern is being expressed about the impact of pretrial publicity on the O.J. Simpson murder case. On Friday, Superior Court Judge Cecil J. Mills, saying grand jurors had been exposed to such pretrial publicity, halted their work while they were considering an indictment of Simpson. Just one day earlier, our top law enforcement officials took a vow of silence after Los Angeles City Atty.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1995 | JOHN BRENNAN, JOHN BRENNAN is director of The Los Angeles Times Poll
The advent of the Republican Congress and its "contract with America" has provided rich new sources of argument for politicians and pontificators. And to this observer, it's brought a whole new life to one of the more annoying habits of those who occupy the Sunday op-ed pages and talk shows--making unwarranted claims about public opinion.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | JOHN BRENNAN, TIMES POLL DIRECTOR
Twenty years after the U.S. surgeon general first warned about the health risks of cigarette smoking, Americans are convinced that the practice is harmful--but are not ready to make this a tobacco-free nation. Congress and the Clinton Administration are pondering sweeping anti-smoking measures. And a landmark class-action lawsuit recently charged tobacco companies with conspiring to addict smokers to their product.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Samia Farid, the war in the Gulf became reality only last Wednesday, when she noticed that the wards in the hospital where she works were being emptied to make room for the casualties Egypt expects to suffer in a ground offensive to liberate Kuwait. "Until then," she said, "I did not realize what it would mean to be at war. It was still too far away. Until then, I supported the government, but now I am not so sure." Slowly but perceptibly, public opinion in Egypt is beginning to shift.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At one of the innumerable news conferences during the Middle East peace conference in Madrid, an Arab journalist asked a question of a Jordanian official in Arabic. "Do you mind if we conduct this in English?" the Jordanian replied. The journalist paused, then rephrased the question in English so that a worldwide television audience could understand the answer.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2000 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bill Gates appeared in a television commercial last month to argue his case for keeping Microsoft Corp. intact, Advertising Age columnist Bob Garfield quipped that Microsoft's co-founder and chairman hoped to "look less like Dr. No and more like Mr. Rogers." Wearing a comfortable sweater and an easy smile, Gates provided an amiable and low-key contrast to the testy and forgetful executive who appeared in videotaped testimony shown during the Justice Department's landmark antitrust trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2000 | MATTHEW ROBINSON, Matthew Robinson, a fellow at the Phillips Foundation and adjunct fellow at the Claremont Institute, is writing a book about polling and the media
Those who take polls say they capture public opinion at a given moment in time. But there is reason to doubt whether what they give us is reality at all. In fact, Americans hold inconsistent and often contradictory positions on public policy questions. Today, fewer than half of Americans can even name their representatives in Congress, with barely one in 10 able to say what policies and programs that person backs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Northridge Athletic Director Bob Hiegert said Friday that he believes the Faculty Senate's request to shift funds from athletics to educational programs is inappropriate and contrary to public opinion. Hiegert was responding to a Faculty Senate vote Thursday to ask the CSUN Foundation to hold a public hearing to reconsider its decision to grant $4.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | Janet Stobart and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Antiwar activists marched through London on Saturday in a protest that was angrier but smaller than past demonstrations, while polls showed public opinion shifting to the government now that British troops are fighting and dying in Iraq. More than 100,000 marchers denounced the invasion of Iraq, which has claimed the lives of 14 British soldiers in two helicopter accidents.
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