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NEWS
November 5, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria, Israel's most formidable adversary and the gatekeeper of hard-line Arab politics, had figured to dominate the landscape at the Middle East peace conference. Instead, Syria proved to be a paper tiger, outmaneuvered by Israel in the theater of public opinion and helpless to control the Arabs' slow movement toward the peace table. As Arabs and Israelis sat down for their first face-to-face talks in 43 years of turbulent history, all the lessons of the new Middle East came sharply into play.
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NATIONAL
December 13, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
A majority of Americans favor setting a fixed timetable for bringing troops home from Iraq, and just 12% would support a plan to increase troop strength, an option under serious consideration by the military, a Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll has found. A month after a watershed election that switched control of Congress to the Democrats, respondents expressed low confidence in President Bush's ability to resolve the conflict in Iraq.
NEWS
March 15, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
There are two Rodney G. King civil rights trials taking place at the Edward R. Roybal federal courthouse. One is being held in the stately eighth-floor courtroom of U.S. District Judge John G. Davies. This proceeding is governed by exacting rules of evidence designed to prohibit the admission of information that is irrelevant, hearsay or likely to unfairly inflame the passions of the jury.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Haltingly, after nine weeks of investigation and despite opinion polls showing him to be one of the nation's least popular figures, independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr is gaining traction. Starr at minimum has gathered circumstantial evidence to support allegations that President Clinton twice committed perjury in sworn testimony earlier this year: Audiotaped conversations and the testimony of several witnesses clash with Clinton's sworn denials that he had intimate contact with Monica S.
OPINION
May 12, 2011
Religious institutions in this country that object to homosexuality have nothing to fear from the gay-rights movement. Freedom of religion constitutionally protects them from having to perform same-sex marriages or elevate gays and lesbians to the clergy. Yet as society opens itself to new viewpoints over time, those perspectives influence people of faith. So it was that the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) this week voted to allow the ordination of gay ministers, elders and deacons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1994 | LAWRENCE JACOBS and ROBERT SHAPIRO, Lawrence Jacobs and Robert Shapiro are political scientists specializing in opinion polling and policy-making, Jacobs at the University of Minnesota, Shapiro at Columbia University.
Many Americans believe that public opinion polls are today's political narcotic. Polls explain politicians' addiction to pandering. The corrupting effect of polling has left few officeholders willing to say "no" to the public's whims and make the tough decisions necessary to bring the government's budget under control. Polling undeniably suffers from pitfalls, but the problems are often exaggerated and misunderstood. Polls clearly do not provide ideal measures of what the public wants.
WORLD
March 13, 2003 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Global public opinion may be shaping the frantic diplomatic maneuvering over Iraq more than it has affected any international crisis in memory, experts say. The spread of sophisticated polling techniques has combined with the prominent role of the United Nations to give mass opinion almost unprecedented influence over the debate on war.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1998 | GREG MILLER and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Battling the world's most powerful software company is a daunting enough task for the Justice Department and 20 states, including California, in their landmark antitrust suits against Microsoft Corp. But the government may find it equally important--and just as tricky--to wage the battle for public opinion. Experts say it's critical for the government to succeed on both fronts in a case that many believe will ultimately rest on one thing: What is good for the consumer?
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans were horrified and saddened when U.S. troops bombed Hiroshima and Dresden in World War II, pounded Hanoi in the Vietnam War and leveled part of the impoverished neighborhood of Chorrillo during the 1989 invasion of Panama. But civilian casualties were not enough to change Americans' views of those conflicts, and many public opinion analysts believe the same may be true with this week's report that a U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "vocal minority" who call radio talk shows or contact the White House and Congress are much more conservative and critical of President Clinton than is the average American, according to findings released Thursday by the Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press.
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