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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1999 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring multimillion-dollar efforts to sway public opinion, Orange County residents are as polarized as ever over plans for an airport at El Toro, according to a UC Irvine survey released Monday. Divisiveness over the fate of the former Marine Corps Air Station has proved intractable over the past three years as annual polls show that attitudes remain basically unchanged.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1996 | JEAN MERL and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Betting that Los Angeles city taxpayers share their views, Councilmen Joel Wachs and Nate Holden on Friday called for the council to commission a public opinion survey before voting next month on whether to spend public funds on a privately owned and operated downtown sports arena.
OPINION
April 13, 2012
In announcing that she was charging George Zimmerman with second-degree murder in the death of Trayvon Martin, special prosecutor Angela B. Corey insisted that "we do not prosecute by public pressure or by petition. " That's an important assurance; the government shouldn't bring a case except when allegations are backed up by facts and evidence. On the other hand, Corey wouldn't even have been in a position to assess the case against the neighborhood watch volunteer had there not been a public outcry about his release the night of the killing after what looked like a slipshod police investigation.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With abortion rights advocates riding a wave of favorable public opinion in California, anti-abortion lobbyists and lawmakers are quietly devising a legislative strategy they hope will turn the tables and put the pro-choice side on the spot. The opponents of abortion realize that a majority of Californians, asked in the abstract, favor a woman's right to choose abortion.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signs of a new optimism in the war on drugs emerged Friday as Senate Democrats and Bush Administration officials said they were convinced that the United States had turned the corner at last in its anti-drug fight. The apparent consensus, a striking reversal from the partisan bickering that dominated the issue a few months ago, was evident in separate assertions by drug czar William J.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese and the Soviets said Wednesday that they see their first real chance of settling a dispute that has bedeviled their relations for four decades--the diplomatic stalemate over the ownership of four islands seized by the Soviet Union from Japan at the end of World War II. Although Soviet officials were notably more upbeat about prospects for an agreement on the future of the southern Kurils, Japan's tough negotiators were saying they see "a clear, emerging possibility of a resolution."
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Cubans switched their attention Tuesday from rafts to visas in ongoing bids to flee to the United States, the Clinton Administration deliberated new policies to undermine the flagging regime of President Fidel Castro. As part of an agreement with Washington, Havana belatedly moved Tuesday to prevent Cubans from taking to makeshift rafts for the treacherous 90-mile journey to Florida.
NEWS
December 28, 1993 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began in earnest with John F. Kennedy. Now, 33 years later, public opinion polling has become a fixture in American government--so much so that even pollsters quarrel over whether they have become too influential in shaping public policy. Some pollsters point out that President Clinton's pollster, Stanley B. Greenberg, is one of his most important advisers.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | Janet Stobart and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Antiwar activists marched through London on Saturday in a protest that was angrier but smaller than past demonstrations, while polls showed public opinion shifting to the government now that British troops are fighting and dying in Iraq. More than 100,000 marchers denounced the invasion of Iraq, which has claimed the lives of 14 British soldiers in two helicopter accidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | JEAN O. PASCO and MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Forces grappling over the fate of a commercial airport proposed for the former El Toro Marine base will spend $14 million of public money this fiscal year just to promote their positions--nearly the amount spent in the previous five years combined. The money is being used by pro- and anti-airport cities and Orange County for various media consultants, lawyers, public-relations companies and lobbyists in Sacramento and Washington.
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