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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Add one more job to the already busy schedule of former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa -- this one at USC. Villaraigosa has been appointed a part-time professor at the USC Price School of Public Policy and will focus on such issues as state government, planning and transportation, USC officials announced Friday. In his new role, Villaraigosa is expected to lecture to undergraduate and graduate students and lead a new think tank called “the USC Villaraigosa Initiative for Restoring the California Dream,” which will sponsor forums and reports on major policy issues, according to the school.
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OPINION
December 4, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Come New Year's Day, in Washington state and Colorado, marijuana will be legit, courtesy of two ballot initiatives. How do you create a legal business out of an illegal one? After 13 years of Prohibition, the country at least had an earlier legal liquor market to refer to. That's where Mark Kleiman comes in, the go-to expert on these matters. A UCLA professor of public policy and author and coauthor of books like "Marijuana Legalization," he's heard all the jokes about "hemperor" and "your serene high-ness.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1992
In "Religion Has No Corner on Morality," David Link (Commentary, Sept. 15) has contributed a cogent logical argument for equal treatment of gays and lesbians in our society. Codifying religious dogma in a country made up of a broad range of religious and non-religious interests is not in the best interests of democracy. The United States was founded on the belief that all men are created equal and have certain unalienable rights. It is a shame that in this nation--which endorses no official religion and is not a religious state as is Vatican City--there are people poised to legislate the rights if not the lives of gays and lesbians out of existence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Add one more job to the already busy schedule of former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa -- this one at USC. Villaraigosa has been appointed a part-time professor at the USC Price School of Public Policy and will focus on such issues as state government, planning and transportation, USC officials announced Friday. In his new role, Villaraigosa is expected to lecture to undergraduate and graduate students and lead a new think tank called “the USC Villaraigosa Initiative for Restoring the California Dream,” which will sponsor forums and reports on major policy issues, according to the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2001
Health officials in Texas dealt a blow to consumer safety with their recent decision to suspend a law requiring warning labels on dietary supplements containing the powerful and sometimes dangerous stimulant ephedrine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1999
The Coro Program in Public Affairs, which teaches participants about the concrete aspects of public policy, is accepting applications until Feb. 5. Twelve students "with a hunger for public life" are taught how the machine of public affairs operates, through internships, seminars and interviews with leaders, said Coro Executive Director Carol Baker Tharp. Graduates of the program, now in its 40th year in Los Angeles, include Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), U.S. Rep.
OPINION
November 1, 2008
Re: "Don't blame the victims," editorial, Oct. 25 You state that "the more fundamental problem is that too many mortgage brokers, lenders and investors stopped caring whether loans could be repaid." However, the borrowers stopped caring as well. After all, it takes two parties in agreement to make a transaction. You did not state the fundamental problem of this economic disease, just the symptom. Human nature has remained basically unchanged throughout the centuries. It is not reasonable to ascribe economic crises solely to such foibles as greed, not caring or imprudence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1988
It has been said that compromise makes a good umbrella but a poor roof. That was evident again last Monday in the deal worked out between directors of the Orange County Transit District and the Orange County Transportation Commission. Under the settlement, the Transportation Commission, which supervises all transportation projects in the county, agreed to withdraw two bills pending in the Legislature that would have taken big chunks out of a $200-million Transit District reserve fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2006 | George Skelton
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger already was a poster boy for why we need real campaign finance reform in California. And now he has created a poster girl: Susan Kennedy. In fact, Schwarzenegger shows us why we need the ultimate reform: public financing of campaigns. That would dramatically shrink the politicians' money pots. There's way too much private money in politics, most of it invested by special interests seeking favors from the politicians they're bankrolling.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1991 | JOSEPH BENTI, Benti is a former TV newscaster. and
The Sept. 11 Calendar report of the death of actor Brad Davis provides yet another frightening illustration of the need for a massive change in public policy regarding the way we deal with AIDS and its victims. The report of the life and death of Davis makes clear, both in what was reported and what one might reasonably surmise, that Davis made some dangerous choices in the more than half-a-dozen years he knew he was infected by AIDS.
SPORTS
September 18, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
OK, stop laughing. No, really, you must stop laughing. Frank McCourt, bless his generous little heart, is feeling magnanimous. He just gave $100 million to Georgetown University to found the McCourt School of Public Policy. I absolutely demand you stop laughing. Listen, $100 million is a lot of money. You could ask Jamie McCourt. Any school in the country would, apparently, sell its soul to get it. This is very generous of McCourt. Heck, for that much money he could afford to get divorced two or three times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
California lawmakers have taken a lot of heat since approving a provision weakening access to public records last week. Now they're backtracking on the proposal, which was originally put forward by Gov. Jerry Brown. In his Thursday column , The Times' George Skelton says it's another example of the governor's disregard for the media, whom he rarely speaks with. In fact, he left a San Francisco event in the morning without taking questions from reporters about public records. "Brown has shown little interest in dispensing information that doesn't promote his own political agenda," he writes.
OPINION
March 26, 2013
Re "They aren't like the rest of us," Opinion, March 22 That rich people should act in their own self-interest is not surprising. What is unfortunate for our democracy is their extreme degree of political influence. Political leaders are put into office to represent us all. The average voter hasn't the time to brood over many of the finer political issues. We are looking for work, trying to get through school, dealing with family health issues or simply keeping creditors at bay. The rich have more options to mitigate these stresses.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Paul West
WASHINGTON -- The possibility of a three-way gubernatorial free-for-all in Virginia evaporated Tuesday, as Republican Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling announced that he would not run as an independent, citing money as the main impediment. Bolling's decision, disclosed in an email to supporters, is good news for state Atty. Gen.  Ken Cuccinelli, the likely Republican nominee. Cuccinelli, a conservative firebrand, figured to be hurt more than  Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe, a longtime figure on the Washington political scene who was a major fundraiser for Bill and Hillary Clinton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Californians are more optimistic about the direction of their state and the condition of its economy than they have been in years, according to a new poll by the Public Policy Institute of California. The upbeat outlook comes weeks after Gov. Jerry Brown announced that the state's deficit had been wiped out with help from tax hikes approved by voters in November. In the poll, the governor received his highest approval rating since being elected in 2010. Fifty-one percent of those surveyed said they approved of Brown's job performance, up from 41% in September.
OPINION
January 23, 2013 | Patt Morrison
You'd almost think that someone had stapled several resumes together and put them in Raul Ruiz's file: magna cum laude at UCLA; three graduate degrees from Harvard (a medical degree and masters in public policy and in public health); doctoring to poor people on three continents and at home in the poor reaches of the Coachella Valley, where his adoptive parents were migrant workers; an Army award for helping Haiti earthquake victims. And he plays trumpet and dances baile folklorico.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | Times wire services
The Richard & Rhoda Goldman Fund, a prominent Bay Area philanthropic group, has donated $10 million to the Graduate School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. In honor of the gift, the University of California has named the school the Richard and Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy. The gift will help improve the school's facilities on Hearst Avenue and help launch several academic and public outreach initiatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1994 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Center for Peace and Freedom, a think tank to be unveiled next week at the Nixon Library and Birthplace, will be a public policy center unlike any other in the country, officials said Friday. "The Center for Peace and Freedom is going to be an organization that establishes some chairs that engage in the kind of policy study and . . .
OPINION
January 5, 2013
Re "'Zone pricing' plays big role in gas costs," Business, Jan. 2 Congratulations to The Times for discovering economic theory. Costs do not set prices. Prices are defined by the equilibration of supply and demand, and when demand varies by location then price will vary by location. Maximizing profits from selling gasoline is why people bother to sell gas, or for that matter any product or service allocated by market mechanisms. Who knew? James E. Moore II Los Angeles The writer, a professor of public policy and engineering at USC, is the director of the university's transportation engineering program.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook has made it official: Its users will no longer get a vote in how the giant social network handles their personal information. And the votes that they did cast over the past week rejecting Facebook's proposed changes to privacy policies will not count. Facebook said Tuesday it has already adopted the policy changes. An external auditor reviewed and confirmed the final results, Facebook said. Nearly 669,000 Facebook users voted, most of them opposed to the policy changes, including taking away their right to vote on policy changes.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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