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OPINION
September 13, 2010 | By Caitlin Cross-Barnet
By now, the overwhelming benefit of breastfeeding babies to improve their health, and sometimes to save their lives, is universally acknowledged, even by the companies that produce formula. But breast-feeding rates remain alarmingly low, and the reason is the relentless marketing of these same companies, the implicit collaboration of well-meaning hospitals and the unwillingness of government to abide by its international commitments. Though we would all like to believe that we outsmart advertising and make decisions based on rational assessments, formula companies and the World Health Organization know better.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Zachary Karabell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We live in an era of economic anxiety. There have been other such eras, but this one seems particularly acute. Though the actual fortunes of Americans differ widely, there is a shared sense of something not right. That sentiment acts as a negative glue, binding Americans in a collective malaise. In the words of economist and professor Robert E. Wright, America today is a FUBAR economy, a system that is "fouled up beyond all recognition. " In a series of essays that constitute his uneven yet entertaining book, Wright explores key examples of the "Fubarnomics" that characterize the United States today.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2010 | By Jennifer Martinez, Tribune Washington Bureau
Andrew McLaughlin built Google Inc.'s public policy operation and helped craft its government lobbying strategy. Now he works for the White House on Internet policy — and that has some Google rivals crying foul as federal officials prepare to rewrite the rules governing high-speed Internet. The so-called net neutrality rules expected to be issued by the Federal Communications Commission are seen as a boon to Google by limiting the ability of high-speed Internet service providers, such as phone and cable companies, to steer users to their own content.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2010 | James Rainey
Revenue plummets right along with dreary circulation. Time slashes its staff. Newsweek hovers near extinction. Survival and stable footing seem assured only for the frothiest and most specialized magazines. Yet one woman looks into this bleak media sea and sees an opportunity, if not to make money, to fill a void with serious, solutions-oriented journalism. The result is Miller-McCune, a bimonthly journal that focuses on social issues and public policy with the same passion that supermarket glossies lavish on "Biggest Loser" photo spreads and Heidi Montag's latest turn under the plastic surgeon's knife.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The green technology movement in Silicon Valley landed an international name Monday when Khosla Ventures said former British Prime Minister Tony Blair would join the venture capital firm as a senior advisor. Khosla Ventures, the Menlo Park, Calif., firm founded by Vinod Khosla in 2004, made the announcement at its summit for limited partners in Sausalito. Blair will advise Khosla Ventures portfolio companies on public policy. Khosla is currently investing $1.1 billion in tech firms, including so-called clean technology.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2009 | Manya A. Brachear and Ron Grossman
Although Erla Feinberg's final act might have disappointed most of her grandchildren, it carried out her late husband's dying wish in a way that held up in court. In a unanimous decision, the Illinois Supreme Court this week ruled that Max Feinberg and his wife could legally disinherit any grandchildren who married outside the Jewish faith as long as the method of doing so did not encourage divorce. "Although those plans might be offensive to individual family members or to outside observers, Max and Erla were free to distribute their bounty as they saw fit and to favor grandchildren of whose life choices they approved," Justice Rita Garman wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
Today, two gripes for the price of one. First, a bureaucratic nightmare involving an award-winning Los Angeles teacher who wants to teach FOR FREE. Naturally, he can't get the go-ahead, even though the district is strapped for cash. And then I've got the case of a terminally ill woman who has been locked up 27 years for the murder of her violently abusive boyfriend, even though the key witness against her was a liar, the district attorney's office agreed four years ago that it was time to let her go and a state parole board has recommended her release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2009 | Adam Bernstein
Ernest W. Lefever, who founded a conservative public policy organization in Washington, D.C., and was an embattled nominee for a State Department human rights job under President Reagan, died Wednesday at a Church of the Brethren nursing home in New Oxford, Pa. He was 89 and had Lewy body dementia, a progressive brain disorder. Lefever, a resident of Chevy Chase, Md., was an international affairs specialist with the National Council of Churches, a staff consultant on foreign affairs to then-Sen.
OPINION
November 1, 2008
Re: "Don't blame the victims," editorial, Oct. 25 You state that "the more fundamental problem is that too many mortgage brokers, lenders and investors stopped caring whether loans could be repaid." However, the borrowers stopped caring as well. After all, it takes two parties in agreement to make a transaction. You did not state the fundamental problem of this economic disease, just the symptom. Human nature has remained basically unchanged throughout the centuries. It is not reasonable to ascribe economic crises solely to such foibles as greed, not caring or imprudence.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2008 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
Soon after Sarah Palin was elected mayor of the foothill town of Wasilla, Alaska, she startled a local music teacher by insisting in casual conversation that men and dinosaurs coexisted on an Earth created 6,000 years ago -- about 65 million years after scientists say most dinosaurs became extinct -- the teacher said.
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