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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2000
Our public servants have enslaved their masters. PHILIP KALISH La Mirada
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WORLD
January 3, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - A group of armed men posing as public servants talked their way into a prison in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero early Friday and unleashed a bloody attack on inmates and guards, according to the state prosecutor's office. At least nine people were killed in the assault and the ensuing shootout with prison guards. The attack occurred in the city of Iguala, about halfway between Mexico City and the Pacific Coast resorts of Acapulco. It came less than two months after Mexico's national human rights commission issued a report that detailed the wretched state of the country's penal system, noting that 65 of the nation's 101 most crowded prisons are effectively under inmate control.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 2008
A reader (Letters, Aug. 31) paints a picture that all pension costs are paid by the taxpayers. This is very far from the truth. The employee also pays. This money is paid into the most successful retirement system in the nation, the California State Public Employees' Retirement System. The system, in turn, earns money for the eventual retirement of the public employee. I do not understand what is wrong with the eventual retirement of our public servants. George W. Cox Rancho Cucamonga -- Very large sums of money are deducted monthly from teachers' paychecks and invested for them by the California State Teachers' Retirement System.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Manfred Rommel, the former mayor of the German city of Stuttgart and the son of the World War II field marshal dubbed the "Desert Fox," has died. He was 84. Rommel died Thursday, local authorities said in a statement on Stuttgart's official website. He had Parkinson's disease. Rommel, who served as mayor from 1975 to 1996 in the city of his birth, came to prominence as a municipal politician who earned international respect for his tolerance and liberal policies, standing up for the fair treatment of immigrant workers who helped rebuild Germany's automotive industry in the postwar years.
REAL ESTATE
March 4, 2001 | LEW SICHELMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Public servants, take heart: Several key federal legislators are back again with a bill that would make it easier for teachers, policemen and firemen to buy houses in the communities where they work through the Federal Housing Administration. A similar measure passed the House last year but was waylaid in the Senate. This time, though, sponsors believe they will be able to get around the opposition of Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995
The Times has printed an excellent series of articles on pay and salary levels in Orange County city/county governments. The article on Aug. 24 ("25 City Workers Earn $126,000 or More Each in '94") concerning Huntington Beach city employees was frightening for the way in which an "easy money" attitude seems to prevail at all levels of city employment there. In your Sept. 19 front-page article ("200 Employees of O.C. Earn $100,000-Plus"), it seems there is a similar lack of checks and balances (toward overtime)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO — This is a story of two politicians who share private horrors, a special bond and, now, a rare honor. Paul N. "Pete" McCloskey, the former eight-term Bay Area congressman, led six bayonet charges as the head of his platoon while in Korea. The holder of two Purple Hearts, a Silver Star and the Navy Cross, he returned home to dedicate his public life to fighting for peace and the environment. Now 84, with a square face and shock of white hair, McCloskey prefers not to recount the battles that twice left him wounded, telling a documentarian not long ago that recounting his experience would be "unseemly" braggadocio.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | United Press International
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone received a $27,700 bonus, one of the $11.5 billion in year-end bonuses paid to 4.75 million public servants today, officials said. Nakasone, whose regular yearly salary is $137,000, received the largest bonus alloted to members of both houses of Japan's parliament, called the Diet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
During closing statements that were both impassioned and scornful, the prosecution presented the six former City Council members accused in the Bell corruption trial as thieves who fleeced a small, working-class town, while the defense portrayed them as hard-working public servants dedicated to their community. Deputy Dist. Atty. Edward Miller took aim at the defendants, saying that instead of serving their low-income constituents, they were more interested in fattening their wallets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2013 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
ORANGE COVE, Calif. - When Victor Lopez was voted out after three decades as mayor of this small Central Valley town, his political nemeses took little time to dismantle what they considered a self-celebratory fiefdom. The Victor Lopez Community Center became the Orange Cove Community Center. Ditto the name changes planned for a street, park bandstand and day care center. As surely as the de-Stalinization of the Soviet Union, Lopez was to be erased from Orange Cove. "Don't do this," Mayor Gabriel Jimenez, a political neophyte who defeated Lopez in a close 2010 election, recalls warning fellow lawmakers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO — This is a story of two politicians who share private horrors, a special bond and, now, a rare honor. Paul N. "Pete" McCloskey, the former eight-term Bay Area congressman, led six bayonet charges as the head of his platoon while in Korea. The holder of two Purple Hearts, a Silver Star and the Navy Cross, he returned home to dedicate his public life to fighting for peace and the environment. Now 84, with a square face and shock of white hair, McCloskey prefers not to recount the battles that twice left him wounded, telling a documentarian not long ago that recounting his experience would be "unseemly" braggadocio.
OPINION
February 12, 2012
Judge Michael Nash, who presides over the Los Angeles County Juvenile Court, has long argued that public access to the court's proceedings would improve its accountability and the accountability of those who appear before it. Last week, he set out to prove it. Nash, along with this page, had supported state legislation that would change the presumption that dependency court hearings, in which the fate of children in foster care is decided, should...
NATIONAL
October 6, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
The other shoe, this one a stiletto, has dropped. One day after New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announced he would not vie for the Republican presidential nomination, perhaps the only other Republican with the power to shake up the field announced that she would not run either. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, 47, released a letter to supporters Wednesday telling them that "after much prayer and serious consideration," she had decided not to seek the GOP nomination for 2012. The letter, first posted by ABC News on its website, was later emailed to reporters.
WORLD
July 27, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber with explosives packed into his turban killed the mayor of Kandahar on Wednesday -- the latest in a wave of assassinations that claimed the life of President Hamid Karzai's half-brother earlier this month. The assailant apparently mingled with a crowd of constituents meeting Mayor Ghulam Hamidi, who had lived in the United States for years before returning to Afghanistan and taking up his dangerous post. The blast killed at least one other person, a provincial spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2011 | By Elizabeth Mehren, Special to the Los Angeles Times
R. Sargent Shriver, a lawyer who served as the social conscience of two administrations, launching the Peace Corps for his brother-in-law, President Kennedy, and leading the "war on poverty" for President Johnson, has died. He was 95. Shriver died Tuesday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., his family said in a statement. His health had been in decline since he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2003. His illness moved his daughter, California's then-First Lady Maria Shriver, to testify before Congress in 2009 about the disease's "terrifying" reality.
WORLD
September 2, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon and Kylé Pienaar, Los Angeles Times
A strike by 1.3 million South African public servants threatened Thursday to drag on for a third week as unions signaled that they would reject the government's latest compromise offer, a wage hike that would be more than double the rate of inflation. Zwelinzima Vavi, secretary-general of the main trade union federation, COSATU, said his organization had rejected the offer but that talks continued. Unions representing nurses, health and education workers, and police also said they would reject the offer, and other unions said they would follow suit in the coming days.
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