Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPublishers Clearing House
IN THE NEWS

Publishers Clearing House

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal judge has approved a $30-million settlement of a class-action lawsuit that accused Publishers Clearing House of misleading its sweepstakes entrants. The suit claimed the company duped people into buying magazines by falsely leading them to believe it would increase their chances of winning millions of dollars. The settlement had won preliminary approval in June by U.S. District Judge G. Patrick Murphy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010 | DAVID LAZARUS
These guys have to be some of the dumbest scammers ever. But their ploy is so brazen -- and so potentially attractive in these tough economic times -- you could just see it succeeding. That is, if they ever get their story straight. Beverly Hills resident Joy Shefter told me she had received a call the other day from a man identifying himself as a Bank of America employee. He said he had a cashier's check for Shefter's husband, Milt, from Publishers Clearing House. The check was for $2.5 million.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 25, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sixteen states, including California, filed complaints Monday against sweepstakes giant Publishers Clearing House, claiming the company misled consumers into believing that they had a better chance of winning if they ordered more products. The Port Washington, N.Y.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2001 | From Reuters
Publishers Clearing House said Tuesday it has agreed to pay $34 million to 26 states to settle all remaining allegations it used deceptive sweepstakes promotions to sell magazines. The agreement comes 10 months after the company, one of the largest U.S. magazine subscription agencies, settled with the other 24 states, including California, and the District of Columbia for $18 million.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Publishers Clearing House, the giant magazine marketer, has agreed to reform its business practices and refund $16 million to customers in California and 22 other states under a sweeping settlement expected to fundamentally change how the sweepstakes industry does business.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1999
* Representatives from 25 states are meeting today in Indianapolis to discuss whether laws are needed to prevent deceptive gimmicks by sweepstakes firms. Indiana and others have suits pending against American Family Publishers and Publishers Clearing House, claiming they mislead consumers in their mailings with enticements of big winnings. * Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan repeats his testimony on the state of the U.S. economy to the House Banking Committee.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010 | DAVID LAZARUS
These guys have to be some of the dumbest scammers ever. But their ploy is so brazen -- and so potentially attractive in these tough economic times -- you could just see it succeeding. That is, if they ever get their story straight. Beverly Hills resident Joy Shefter told me she had received a call the other day from a man identifying himself as a Bank of America employee. He said he had a cashier's check for Shefter's husband, Milt, from Publishers Clearing House. The check was for $2.5 million.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2001 | From Reuters
Publishers Clearing House said Tuesday it has agreed to pay $34 million to 26 states to settle all remaining allegations it used deceptive sweepstakes promotions to sell magazines. The agreement comes 10 months after the company, one of the largest U.S. magazine subscription agencies, settled with the other 24 states, including California, and the District of Columbia for $18 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987 | John M. Wilson
A pop culture icon crumbles: The National Enquirer is dumping its 6-year-old "inquiring minds" promo campaign to go after new readers. But president/editor Iain Calder says it has nothing to do with new circulation figures showing Rupert Murdoch's Star gaining ground. (The Star averaged weekly sales of 3.7 million for the six months ending June 30, according to Ad Age, compared to 4.4 million for the Enquirer. That was a 1% drop over the Enquirer's first six months of 1986; the Star gained 5.2%.
NATIONAL
March 8, 1999 | CAROLINE E. MAYER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Super Bowl Sunday is usually a depressing day for Eustace Hall--not because his team loses, but because Publishers Clearing House never comes to his house to award him millions of dollars. Hall has even put up signs on his Florida home to make sure the company's famed Prize Patrol would know it had the right house. Hall, a retired medical technologist, has spent more than $15,000 since 1992 entering sweepstakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2001
Hurry! Read this!! You could be a Winner!!! This is Top Priority and Confidential. Any day now, about 5,000 Californians should begin receiving a Grand Total of nearly $5 million in refunds from Publishers Clearing House with checks made out to (your name here). No, really.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2000 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time Inc. on Thursday said it will refund more than $4.9 million to about 6,000 customers--including 900 in California--who may have been deceived into believing that their chances of winning a company-sponsored sweepstakes would be improved by purchasing magazine subscriptions and other products. Time, a unit of New York-based Time Warner Inc., becomes the third sweepstakes firm to settle with state regulators in the past five months.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Publishers Clearing House, the giant magazine marketer, has agreed to reform its business practices and refund $16 million to customers in California and 22 other states under a sweeping settlement expected to fundamentally change how the sweepstakes industry does business.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal judge has approved a $30-million settlement of a class-action lawsuit that accused Publishers Clearing House of misleading its sweepstakes entrants. The suit claimed the company duped people into buying magazines by falsely leading them to believe it would increase their chances of winning millions of dollars. The settlement had won preliminary approval in June by U.S. District Judge G. Patrick Murphy.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sixteen states, including California, filed complaints Monday against sweepstakes giant Publishers Clearing House, claiming the company misled consumers into believing that they had a better chance of winning if they ordered more products. The Port Washington, N.Y.
NATIONAL
March 8, 1999 | CAROLINE E. MAYER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Super Bowl Sunday is usually a depressing day for Eustace Hall--not because his team loses, but because Publishers Clearing House never comes to his house to award him millions of dollars. Hall has even put up signs on his Florida home to make sure the company's famed Prize Patrol would know it had the right house. Hall, a retired medical technologist, has spent more than $15,000 since 1992 entering sweepstakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2001
Hurry! Read this!! You could be a Winner!!! This is Top Priority and Confidential. Any day now, about 5,000 Californians should begin receiving a Grand Total of nearly $5 million in refunds from Publishers Clearing House with checks made out to (your name here). No, really.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2000 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time Inc. on Thursday said it will refund more than $4.9 million to about 6,000 customers--including 900 in California--who may have been deceived into believing that their chances of winning a company-sponsored sweepstakes would be improved by purchasing magazine subscriptions and other products. Time, a unit of New York-based Time Warner Inc., becomes the third sweepstakes firm to settle with state regulators in the past five months.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1999
* Representatives from 25 states are meeting today in Indianapolis to discuss whether laws are needed to prevent deceptive gimmicks by sweepstakes firms. Indiana and others have suits pending against American Family Publishers and Publishers Clearing House, claiming they mislead consumers in their mailings with enticements of big winnings. * Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan repeats his testimony on the state of the U.S. economy to the House Banking Committee.
MAGAZINE
September 28, 1997 | Howard Rosenberg
It's the season again. Now that the pro football wars have resume, so have the sweepstakes wars. And a year ago, my wife, Carol, and I were on the front lines. Most of us work hard much of our lives just trying to earn a living. So it's human nature to look longingly at those who get something for nothing and wish the same for yourself. It needn't be much. A mere few million would smooth some wrinkles. Which explains what Carol and I were doing in front of a TV set last Jan. 26.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|