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Publishing Industry

NEWS
April 17, 1997 | PAUL D. COLFORD
Publishing industry observers were startled Wednesday by the announcement that Landon Y. Jones Jr., the top editor of People magazine for more than seven years, is moving to a corporate position within Time Inc. Jones, whose title is managing editor, will be succeeded by Carol Wallace, who has been deputy managing editor for three years and has presided over such annual franchises as the "50 Most Beautiful People" issue. People has a weekly circulation of 3.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 1991 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The book business has a message for Cable News Network's Peter Arnett: "Phone home." Arnett, who has stirred controversy with his dramatic if heavily censored reports from bomb-plagued Baghdad, is suddenly one of the publishing industry's hottest commodities--in absentia. Hungry editors and agents are convinced that an uncensored, no-holds-barred book by the veteran war correspondent would be an enormous seller both in the United States and abroad. "He's perfect. He's right there.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2011 | Reuters
Spam has hit the Kindle, clogging Amazon.com Inc.'s top-selling e-reader with material that is far from being book-worthy and threatening to undermine the company's entry into publishing. Thousands of digital books, called e-books, are being published through Amazon's self-publishing system each month. Many are not written in the traditional sense. Instead, they are built using something known as Private Label Rights, or PLR content, which is information that can be bought very cheaply online then reformatted into a digital book.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephen King's novels have sent a shiver up readers' spines for more than 20 years. His new book deal may have a similar effect on publishers. Viacom Inc.-owned Simon & Schuster said Thursday that it had struck an unprecedented deal with King, whereby he will take a smaller-than-expected advance in exchange for sharing half the profit generated by his next three books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2008 | Scott Timberg and Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writers
As the publishing world reeled over yet another faked memoir -- this one by a supposed former drug-running foster child from South-Central Los Angeles who was actually raised by her middle-class family in Sherman Oaks -- those involved with the book's publication tried to explain how they fell for the deception. "Love and Consequences" tells the story of a part Native American L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
For the foreseeable future, book sales are looking flat. According to the latest report from the Book Industry Study Group, released Friday, dollar sales and the number of books sold will increase by small levels through 2011, rising by 3% or less each year. The book business totaled $35.7 billion in 2006, a 3% increase over the previous year. The number of books sold rose to 3.1 billion, an increase of just 0.5%.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The publishing industry enjoyed a strong year in 2005, with increases in both revenues and the number of books sold. But projections for long-term growth remain limited because people increasingly don't read, according to a study released Friday. Over the last few years, the number of books published has soared even as sales have fallen. That changed in 2005. A recent report by statisticians R.R. Bowker projected that the number of books released actually dropped last year, to 172,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Patti's Return: Rocker Patti Smith, whose first album since 1988, "Gone Again," hits stores on June 18, will make her first U.S. television appearance in 18 years when she shows up this weekend on Fox TV's "Saturday Night Special." Smith will perform the album's title track and also give a poetry reading. The new album includes 10 new songs, plus a cover version of Bob Dylan's "Wicked Messenger."
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientific researchers haven't yet proved that brain cells melt in the summer sun. But is empirical evidence really necessary to explain the perennial popularity of beach books, or pool novels, or whatever term publishing industry marketers conjure up to describe trashy entertainments as addictive as M&Ms? Did I say addictive? Yes. As habit-forming as Percodan, the What, Me Worry, mood-elevating painkiller. Or Valium, the Chanel of sedatives, simultaneously modern and classic.
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