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Publishing Industry

February 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The chairman is coming to BookExpo America. Alan Greenspan, former Federal Reserve Board chairman and author of a widely anticipated memoir, will be the keynote speaker June 1 at the publishing industry's annual national convention, to be held in New York from June 1 to 3. Greenspan, 80, reportedly received $8.5 million for his memoir, "The Age of Turbulence," scheduled to come out this fall from Penguin Press.
February 14, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Bonnie Nadel, a veteran Los Angeles literary agent, is weary of the questions she's constantly getting from Hollywood industry types: "They want to option a book for a movie or TV, and they'll ask how many copies the book has sold," Nadel said. "And I'll tell them I really don't know the exact number. I would need inside information, which is very hard to nail down."
January 23, 2007 | From Reuters
A U.S. appeals court has rejected a bid by Internet activists to roll back federal laws that extended copyright protection over "orphan works," or books and other media that are no longer in print. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a lower court decision to dismiss Kahle vs. Gonzales, which argued that legal changes made in the 1990s had vastly extended copyright protections at the expense of free speech rights.
December 21, 2006 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
JUDITH REGAN, who promoted the aborted O.J. Simpson book and TV deal and was subsequently fired as the head of ReganBooks, a HarperCollins imprint, told a radio audience Wednesday that "what happened to me in the last month with the Simpson thing is a story that has yet to be revealed. But there's a lot more to the story than what people think, a lot more to the story."
September 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Time Inc. plans to prune its huge magazine portfolio by seeking buyers for 18 of its smaller titles, allowing it to concentrate on larger properties including Time, People and Sports Illustrated. The titles to be sold include Popular Science, Outdoor Life, Field & Stream and Yachting, the company said Tuesday. News of the planned sales was first reported by Advertising Age magazine. In a memo to Time Inc.
August 19, 2006 | Tanya Caldwell, Times Staff Writer
On his recent book tour, Robert Luedke skimmed four nearly empty rows of folding chairs at a Borders bookstore, hoping someone in the audience -- an audience of three -- would have a question. Or maybe, against the odds, someone would ask him to sign a poster touting his works. No one did. One listener had grabbed a seat in the back row to read Vogue magazine. Eventually, the man spoke up. "I have no idea who you are," he said. "Nobody knows who I am," said Luedke, half-joking, half sighing.
August 5, 2006 | From Reuters
Random House Inc. has acquired the evangelical Christian book-publishing house Multnomah Publishers, a move that reaffirms the growing mainstream popularity of religious books. "There is an enormous market and it is a growth market," Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum said. "We believe that it is a timeless interest." Oregon-based Multnomah is Random House's second Christian imprint. The first, WaterBrook Press, was created in 1996.
July 14, 2006 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
As Tribune Co. reported Thursday a 62% profit drop and accelerating circulation declines, the owner of the Los Angeles Times and KTLA-TV Channel 5 struck a conciliatory posture in its battle with California's Chandler family. "We will look forward to moving constructively with the Chandlers," Tribune Chief Executive Dennis FitzSimons told analysts during a conference call. "They are important shareholders."
June 8, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Google Inc. is being sued by French publisher La Martiniere for indexing some of the company's titles on the Google Book Search website without permission. La Martiniere, which controls Harry N. Abrams Inc. in the U.S., is fighting Google's program to scan the content of books and let users search them. "We disagree with their case, which we will contest in court," Google said. "Google Book Search helps users find and buy books -- not read or download them for free."
May 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Publishing giant Random House is planning a tenfold increase in the amount of recycled paper it uses in books printed in the United States. The company announced Tuesday that by 2010, about 30% of the uncoated paper used in most of its U.S. titles will be made from recycled fibers, up from less than 3% now. Random House Inc. called the change "the most substantial environmental initiative in the company's history" and said it would save the equivalent of 550,000 trees per year.
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