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MAGAZINE
June 11, 1989 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Sam Hall Kaplan is The Times' design critic.
THE DELICATELY CRAFTED, modestly styled house that architect Lorcan O'Herlihy recently designed in Malibu for his parents, actor Dan O'Herlihy and his wife Elsie, is on a slight plateau above Trancas Canyon. The 3,200-square-foot house--with its low profile; simple lines; small, sunken windows; thick, adobe-like walls, and roof hidden behind parapets--is an engaging blend of traditional pueblo and expressive modernist design principles. "I just didn't think any design should, or could, compete with the site and the views, so I kept everything simple, almost minimalist," says the architect, who, after graduating from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, served as an apprentice to such design luminaries as Kevin Roche and I. M. Pei, working with the latter on his famed addition to the Louvre in Paris.
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WORLD
February 26, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
OUTSIDE SAN LUIS DE LA LOMA, Mexico - Don Polo's heavily armed convoy wound its way through the hills above the lush coastal plain of Guerrero state, its groves of slender palm trees now far below him. The two-lane country road twisted eastward, and upward, for miles. But around each bend, there were no campesinos , no burros, no dogs, no cars barreling down toward the Pacific. Fields of yellow grass, grown taller than a man, covered the landscape, animated only by the wind. This, though, was no vision of tranquillity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2003
Nicolai Ouroussoff notes the future Performing and Visual Arts Academy's obvious visual link to Grand Avenue's cultural string of pearls. However, there is no mention of the site's link to L.A.'s earliest history as Ft. Moore, where Mormon soldiers in the Mexican American War looked down upon the Mexican pueblo and were shocked by its gambling, debauchery and bullfights. The eastern edge of the property, above the Hill Street Mormon Battalion Memorial, remarkably offers the same view of this feisty pueblo as seen in its earliest 1840s sketches and 1860s photographs and remains a fascinating and historical perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
There's no performer who can replace Jenni Rivera en los corazones de sus fanaticos . But the show must go on. So Mexican regional music star Espinoza Paz, who was planning a major U.S. tour with Rivera this year, has announced that his fellow up-and-coming regional star Gerardo Ortiz will take the stage in the absence of La Gran Señora, according to reports. The tour was scheduled to include stops in 40 cities; Ortiz's official website has a number of upcoming dates listed.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | JACK SMITH
For Christmas our younger son and his wife gave us a large trunk-like box filled with the sort of articles one sees on lists of things to keep ready in case of an earthquake. We in Southern California live in constant expectation of the Big One and a great many of us, though by no means all, have begun to prepare our earthquake kits. Ours does not contain every recommended item, but it is a good start: flashlight, batteries, jugs of water, first-aid kit, work gloves, a can of peanuts and so on.
TRAVEL
April 16, 1989 | MORTON CATHRO, Cathro, former travel editor of the Oakland Tribune, is a free-lance writer living in Oakland.
One is shaped like a parrot, another is a caricature of a human face. Still another gleams demonlike in the hot afternoon sun, taunting modern man to fathom the mystery of these Indian versions of Egypt's hieroglyphics. Chipped many hundreds of years ago into black lava boulders at the foot of five extinct volcanoes, they lie in stony silence at Indian Petroglyph State Park, just 10 miles south of here and only a snake's rattle from the city limits of Albuquerque. American travelers in Europe, awed by the centuries-old history of that continent and embarrassed by the "newness" of their own, need only come to this charming little Southwest town for a double dose of history as potent as any abroad.
MAGAZINE
January 19, 1986 | LISLE SHOEMAKER, Lisle Shoemaker, who was a war correspondent in the Pacific during World War II,recently retired as editor of the Palm Springs Desert Sun
On Jan. 23, 1968, Cmdr. Lloyd M. Bucher, USN, under attack by North Korean gunboats, surrendered the U.S. intelligence-gathering ship Pueblo. After 11 months in a North Korean prison, he and his crew were released. A U.S. court of inquiry voted that Bucher be tried by general courts-martial. Higher naval authority recommended a letter of reprimand. Secretary of the Navy John H. Chafee, however, ordered all charges dropped.
NEWS
June 5, 1991
Robert Alston Brant Jr., a prominent city businessman and a member of a fourth-generation Los Angeles family who was honored for his volunteer work on behalf of the 1984 Olympic Games, died Tuesday at his home. He was 61 and had been battling cancer, said his daughter, Susan Brant. Son of the founder of Title Insurance & Trust Co., Brant was president of Realty Tax & Service Co., president of Cascade Microfilm and owner of Brant Mining Co. and Brant Properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
There's no performer who can replace Jenni Rivera en los corazones de sus fanaticos . But the show must go on. So Mexican regional music star Espinoza Paz, who was planning a major U.S. tour with Rivera this year, has announced that his fellow up-and-coming regional star Gerardo Ortiz will take the stage in the absence of La Gran Señora, according to reports. The tour was scheduled to include stops in 40 cities; Ortiz's official website has a number of upcoming dates listed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1985 | From Associated Press
Kelly Reno, 18, who played the boy marooned with a beautiful horse in the 1979 film, "The Black Stallion," suffered a broken leg and possible internal injuries in a car accident early Monday, a spokeswoman for St. Mary Corwin Hospital said. Reno, of Pueblo, was involved in an auto accident, along with 15-year-old Lynette Tuttle of Pueblo, said hospital Nursing Supervisor Cherry Trimble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN JOSE - A Northern California-based supermarket chain that caters to Latino immigrant shoppers and was founded by an undocumented schoolteacher from Mexico announced Friday that the company is being audited by federal immigration officials. Disclosure of the audit, which could result in a mass firing, comes six weeks after San Jose-based Mi Pueblo Food Center joined E-Verify, a voluntary and controversial computerized system that screens the immigration status of new employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2012 | By Lee Romney and Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
SAN JOSE - When customers enter Mi Pueblo Food Center to do their weekly shopping, the goal is to make them feel at home. Each of the grocery chain's 21 outlets, which are scattered throughout the Bay Area, Monterey Bay region and Central Valley, is styled to emulate a distinct Mexican region. Boisterous rancheras stream from the stores' speakers. Vivid primary colors and architectural references cover the walls: the adobe church of San Juan Nuevo, Michoacan, in San Jose's flagship store; the Maya pyramid of Chichen Itza in the Salinas market.
OPINION
May 11, 2012
The Los Angeles Unified school board did an injustice to hundreds of students and to the school reform movement when it overrode the recommendation of its staff and decided not to close a low-performing charter school. Academia Semillas del Pueblo in El Sereno is run by dedicated educators who are striving to provide their kindergarten-through-eighth-grade students with a safe environment, a lively and enriched curriculum, as well as skills in three languages. The school has been controversial because one of those languages is an indigenous language of Mexico, and part of the school's mission is to instill in children an understanding and appreciation of their cultural heritage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Things would be easier if Academia Semillas del Pueblo didn't have such low test scores. Then, the focus could be on the El Sereno charter school's International Baccalaureate program. Or on its trilingual curriculum: English, Spanish and Nahuatl, an indigenous language of Mexico. Or on the two co-founders dedicated to teaching culture that stretches back to before colonial Mexico. Instead, the focus shifted in recent weeks to the campus' test results. Compared to schools statewide that serve similar students and when matched against campuses in the neighborhood, results are low. Last year, the school's score on the state's Academic Performance Index dropped 92 points to 624; the state target is 800. Just 22% of students tested at grade level in math, 30% in English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2010 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Federal agents and police swept into a South Los Angeles housing project Wednesday and arrested dozens of alleged gang members indicted on federal racketeering charges for murder, drug dealing and assaults, law enforcement officials said. The raid against the Pueblo Bishop Bloods, a group believed to have long kept a tight, violent grip on drug sales and other illegal activity in the Pueblo del Rio housing project, was the culmination of a two-year investigation by the FBI, Los Angeles Police Department and other agencies, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2010 | Hector Tobar
To many an outsider, Los Angeles is a stage set. It's a city constantly pretending to be something it's not. "L.A. is a stand-in for the rest of the world," said historian William David Estrada. "Our local mountains have been the Alps. Our deserts have been North Africa and China. That's one of the reasons people think of L.A. as a plastic, superficial place." Estrada made this observation as we stood in the old plaza downtown, a place officially known as El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The call came on the eve of his Los Angeles concert, just as he was leaving his home in Mexico. We have your son. Follow our instructions. Don't make trouble. It was a year ago, and Vicente Fernandez was about to headline four sold-out shows at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, his annual Memorial Day pilgrimage to the Eastside suburbs of L.A. Now this voice, saying his 33-year-old son, his namesake, was being held for a ransom of millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | Leah Ollman
The 16 artists who have been brought together in the show "Presente!" at the Acevedo Gallery (4010 Goldfinch) are linked by their common Latino heritage, but little else. The themes they embrace range from the physical to the social and political landscapes, and their approaches vary from the saccharine and blandly decorative to the poignant and penetrating. There are highs and lows in this spotty survey, but the highs are worth searching out.
TRAVEL
November 15, 2009 | By Dean R. Owen, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Visiting North Korea is like peering in the window of a store that closed long ago but where old merchandise mysteriously remains. I walk through the aisles feeling privileged, fascinated and curious, a little nervous, but not scared. It is unlike any other place in the world. Communications and information technology most of the rest of the world takes for granted -- the Internet, cellphones, GPS systems -- are unavailable to civilians. North Korean-sanctioned news about Western nations often is characterized by violence and aggressive government actions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2009 | Scott Gold
Los Angeles Police Sgt. Alex Vargas sprinted across the grass to the front of an apartment. He leaned ever so gently against the door. "It's open," he said, and his breath quickened. He locked eyes with another officer who was standing across the stoop, gun held tight against his thigh. "I'm going in," Vargas said.
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