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NATIONAL
May 2, 2003 | From Reuters
Fireworks exploded and chanting erupted, but there were also incidents of vandalism as the tiny Puerto Rican island of Vieques held festivities Thursday to mark the formal end of its six-decade role as a staging area for U.S. Navy war games. Just hours after the party got underway, a group of young masked protesters overturned and vandalized U.S. Navy vehicles, destroyed a guardhouse and set a U.S. Fish and Wildlife boat on fire, according to eyewitnesses.
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NATIONAL
January 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Navy will expand its use of bombing ranges in Florida and elsewhere on the U.S. mainland -- and may close Roosevelt Roads naval station in Puerto Rico -- after it abandons its training grounds on Vieques in May, officials said Friday. The base has been the largest employer in Puerto Rico. "Without Vieques there is no way I need the Navy facilities at Roosevelt Roads -- none," said Adm. Robert Natter, commander of the Atlantic Fleet. "It's a drain on Defense Department and taxpayer dollars."
NEWS
September 8, 2002 | IAN JAMES, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
The resounding calls of "ko-KEE, ko-KEE" ring out in a cadence that brings music to Puerto Rican nights. The tiny frog that produces the melody is named coqui after its distinctive two-note call and, because it is native only to Puerto Rico, has become a symbol for the island, its culture and its people. "It's like a part of us, a part of our family," said schoolteacher Lourdes Colon, who hears the frogs each night outside her house in tree-covered hills south of San Juan.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2002 | From Associated Press
U.S. Navy fighter jets streaked across the sky Saturday, dropping dummy bombs and inert missiles on Vieques in the type of exercises that have divided this outlying Puerto Rican island for years. In the first of three planned weeks of exercises, Navy destroyers San Jacinto, Briscoe, Mitscher, Deyo and Donald Cook fired their inert bombs without problems and received certificates for completing the training exercises, said Lt. Cmdr. Kim Dixon, a Navy spokeswoman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like marriages, salsa bands love to celebrate anniversaries. In this genre, hitting silver doesn't signify that a band sold so many units. It means they've been together for 25 years. That's not an uncommon milestone for groups from Cuba and Puerto Rico, where bands become institutions that even outlive their founders, batons passed from father to son.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2002 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antonia Pantoja, a social worker by training and social architect by instinct who filled a leadership void in the Puerto Rican immigrant community by building several lasting educational and political institutions, died of cancer May 24 in a New York City hospital. She was 80. Her best-known contribution is Aspira, a national nonprofit organization that she launched in 1961 to address the poor educational attainment of Puerto Rican and other Latino youths.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of thousands of people turned out Sunday along Manhattan's Fifth Avenue to express their Puerto Rican pride mixed with American patriotism in honor of those killed Sept. 11. In a city with a Puerto Rican population of nearly 800,000, politicians were among many dignitaries who participated. This year, the parade's grand marshal was Nicholas Estavillo, who is Puerto Rican and chief of patrol for New York City police.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | CARYN NESMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Beyond narrow roads winding through the mountains of Puerto Rico's Cordillera Central lies a tropical paradise lush with giant ferns, philodendrons and pockets of orchids. Less than a decade ago, this nearly became an eyesore of mile-wide craters dug in a search for copper, silver and gold. But Alexis Massol, a 58-year-old civil engineer, led a community struggle against the government and the mining industry to stop the area from becoming an open-pit mining zone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2001
Epifanio Irizarry Jusino, 86, an impressionist painter known for his watercolors and acrylic paintings of local landscapes and traditions, died of respiratory failure Friday in his native Ponce, Puerto Rico. Irizarry, also known as Fano, was "not only an excellent painter but he also documented for future generations the traditions and folklore of the southern region," said Nestor Murray, founder of the Casa Paoli cultural center in Ponce.
NEWS
August 25, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With historic Yankee Stadium looming just over the smokestacks and rooftops, folks in this collection of gritty, ethnic neighborhoods across the Harlem River from Manhattan have always cheered themselves hoarse for their beloved Bronx Bombers. Nothing's changed this summer, except the South Bronx team that has stolen the hearts of bartenders, cabbies and truck drivers all across town aren't those brash big leaguers in Yankee pinstripes. They're the boys who play for Rolando Paulino's All-Stars.
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