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Pulitzer Prize

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Composer Caroline Shaw has won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for music for her a cappella composition "Partita for 8 Voices. " The two finalists in the category this year were Aaron Jay Kernis for "Pieces of Winter Sky" and Wadada Leo Smith for "Ten Freedom Summers. " "Partita for 8 Voices" was released in October by New Amsterdam Records, featuring the vocal group Roomful of Teeth. On her website, Shaw states that the 26-minute piece was inspired by Sol LeWitt's "Wall Drawing 305" and that it was written for Roomful of Teeth.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By David Colker
Newspaper veteran Larry Burrough, who was the city editor at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner and then a deputy editor at the Orange County Register where he oversaw a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative series, died Monday in Yakima, Wash. He was 66. Burrough had surgery in December to remove a cancerous brain tumor and never fully recovered, said his sister, Nancy Yuckert. "He was a huge personality, born for the news business," said Ed Stover, who worked with Burrough at three newspapers in the Pacific Northwest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Pulitzer Prize in fiction, announced Monday, has been awarded to Adam Johnson for his book set in North Korea, "The Orphan Master's Son. " The committee described the book as "an exquisitely crafted novel that carries the reader on an adventuresome journey into the depths of totalitarian North Korea and into the most intimate spaces of the human heart. " Johnson teaches at Stanford; "The Orphan Master's Son" is his third book. Sharon Olds won the poetry award for her collection "Stag's Leap," cited as "a stunningly poignant sequence of poems that tells the story of a divorce, embracing strands of love, sex, sorrow, memory and new freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The conflict between tradition and assimilation has long been a staple of immigrant drama. No mystery here: Not only is the experience true to life, but there's nothing more theatrical than a family at war with itself. In the "Who & the What," now having its world premiere at La Jolla Playhouse, Ayad Akhtar explores this timeless situation through the clashes within a prosperous Pakistani American family living in Atlanta. As with the playwright's 2013 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama "Disgraced," "The Who & the What" intrepidly treads on sensitive matters regarding Islam.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By David Ng
"Disgraced," Ayad Akhtar's play about a corporate lawyer who has hidden his Pakistani Muslim heritage, has won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for drama. The two finalists were "4000" by Amy Herzog and "Rapture, Blister, Burn,” by Gina Gionfriddo.  This year's drama jury was led by Washington Post theater critic Peter Marks and included playwright Donald Margulies, Princeton University professor Jill Dolan, critic John Fleming and critic Alexis Soloski.  "Disgraced" was produced last year by Lincoln Center Theater in New York, with Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" veteran Aasif Mandvi in the lead role. The play had its world premiere in January 2012 at Chicago's American Theater Company.  FULL COVERAGE: 2013 Spring arts preview The plot follows Amir Kapoor, a lawyer, and his artist wife, Emily, during the course of a dinner party in which buried feelings are revealed.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | Associated Press
JOURNALISM Public Service: The New York Times for "A Nation Challenged," a daily stand-alone section on terrorism and the war in Afghanistan. Breaking News Reporting: The Wall Street Journal staff for coverage of the Sept. 11 attacks under extremely difficult circumstances; its newsroom near the trade center was evacuated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
Decades before she won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, Maxine Kumin was a student at Radcliffe College who had summoned the courage to show a handful of her poems to an instructor. His comment couldn't have been more withering. "Say it with flowers," he wrote, "but for God's sake don't try to write poems. " Kumin heeded his advice. Seven years passed before she tried again, but this time her efforts brought far more encouraging results. With a clear-eyed vision of the natural world, relationships, mortality and the inner lives of women, Kumin became one of the country's most honored poets, whose fourth book of poetry, "Up Country," brought her the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
SPORTS
January 10, 1987
In reference to Mike Downey's column (Jan. 4), specifically to his derogation of the Cleveland Browns, I would like to suggest 10 ways that Mr. Downey could possibly obtain a Pulitzer Prize: 1. By gunpoint. 2. In his wildest dreams. 3. By changing his name to Mother Teresa. 4. If the prize is ever awarded by National Lampoon. 5. By theft. 6. If the prize is ever awarded by lottery. 7. If they added a category for mediocrity. 8. If his family is appointed to the awards committee.
NEWS
September 8, 1990
Lawrence A. Cremin, 64, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian who spent 23 years writing a definitive trilogy on American public education. He won a Pulitzer Prize for history in 1981 for "American Education: The National Experience, 1783-1876," the second volume of his three-volume history of U.S. schools. His final volume, "American Education: The Metropolitan Experience, 1876-1980," was published in 1988.
NATIONAL
November 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The 1932 Pulitzer Prize awarded to a New York Times reporter accused of deliberately ignoring the forced famine in Ukraine to maintain his access to Josef Stalin will not be revoked, the awards board said. "The board determined that there was not clear and convincing evidence of deliberate deception, the relevant standard in this case," said a statement from the Pulitzer Prize Board. A Pulitzer subcommittee began a review of the late Walter Duranty's work in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
Decades before she won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, Maxine Kumin was a student at Radcliffe College who had summoned the courage to show a handful of her poems to an instructor. His comment couldn't have been more withering. "Say it with flowers," he wrote, "but for God's sake don't try to write poems. " Kumin heeded his advice. Seven years passed before she tried again, but this time her efforts brought far more encouraging results. With a clear-eyed vision of the natural world, relationships, mortality and the inner lives of women, Kumin became one of the country's most honored poets, whose fourth book of poetry, "Up Country," brought her the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Donald Forst, a veteran newsman who led New York Newsday and the Village Voice as they won Pulitzer Prizes and also helped resuscitate the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, died Saturday in Albany, N.Y. He was 81. He had colon cancer, said his companion, Val Haynes. Forst's journalism career started in the mid-1950s and included stints as cultural editor of the New York Times, assistant city editor of the New York Post and editor in chief of the Boston Herald. He also worked at more than a dozen other publications, including the Houston Press, Boston magazine and the New York Herald Tribune.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Oscar Hijuelos, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist who died Saturday, was a cultural pioneer who wrote elegant novels about ambitious Cuban expatriates and music-loving New Yorkers. He told stories that revealed the texture and passion of the Latino immigrant experience to legions of non-Latino readers for the first time. The son of Cuban immigrants, Hijuelos was born and raised in the upper half of Manhattan, in one of those wonderfully integrated, working-class neighborhoods the United States produced in the middle of the last century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2013 | Steve Chawkins and Jessica Gelt
Oscar Hijuelos, a son of Cuban immigrants to the U.S. whose 1989 novel "The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love" made him the first Latino to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died. He was 62. His death was confirmed by a spokesman for Gotham Books, which published Hijuelos' 2011 memoir, "Thoughts Without Cigarettes. " Hijuelos had a heart attack Saturday on a Manhattan tennis court, his agent, Jennifer Lyons, told the Associated Press. Though his success helped pave the way for other Latino writers, he never felt comfortable with an ethnic label.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Oscar Hijuelos, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist who died Saturday, was a cultural pioneer who wrote elegant novels about ambitious Cuban expatriates and music-loving New Yorkers. He told stories that revealed the texture and passion of the Latino immigrant experience to legions of non-Latino readers for the first time. The son of Cuban immigrants, Hijuelos was born and raised in the upper half of Manhattan, in one of those wonderfully integrated, working-class neighborhoods the United States produced in the middle of the last century.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Oscar Hijuelos, the author best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love," died Sunday, his publisher Gotham confirmed. Hijuelos was 62 and died in New York. The 1989 novel "The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love" told the story of two Cuban brothers who emigrated to New York to try to make it as musicians in the 1950s. When the book won the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, Hijuelos became the first Latino writer to be awarded that prize. The book was also made into 1992 film, "The Mambo Kings," starring Armand Assante and Antonio Banderas, which was nominated for an Academy Award for best song.
NEWS
May 20, 1988 | Associated Press
David Laventhol, president of Times Mirror Co., has been elected chairman of the 17-member Pulitzer Prize Board, Michael I. Sovern, president of Columbia University, announced. Laventhol succeeds Roger Wilkins, who will remain a board member, for the one-year term. Additionally, Sissela Bok, an associate professor of philosophy at Brandeis University, has been elected to the board, succeeding University of Chicago President Hanna Gray, who served for eight years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By David Ng
Annie Baker and Rajiv Joseph have been named the winners of the 6th Annual Steinberg Playwright Award, an annual theater honor organized by the Harold and Mimi Steinberg Charitable Trust. The awards, which will be handed out at a ceremony in New York on Nov. 18, are intended to recognize young and mid-career playwrights. The winners receive a monetary prize of $50,000 each.  Baker, whose play "Circle Mirror Transformation" had its local debut at South Coast Repertory in 2011, presented her most recent play, "The Flick," at the off-Broadway Playwrights Horizons in March.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Michael McGough
When I lived in Britain, and in many subsequent visits there, I was always struck by the extensive coverage of the Booker Prize, an award for English-language fiction that is now known as the Man Booker Prize. No American newspaper, even the New York Times, ever lavished such attention on U.S. literary awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Inclusion even on the “shortlist" of finalists for the Booker meant a jump in sales and appearances on the BBC. What was strange about the Booker was that it purported to be international but excluded American novelists.
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