Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPunk Music
IN THE NEWS

Punk Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Morell is a regular contributor to The Times
Roger and Judy Peterson should have known something was up when their son Nathan, 17, of fered to clean out the basement. Seven years ago, the Petersons moved into a two-story house in Granada Hills that was built in 1948 and Roger, a professor of management science at CSUN, considered turning the large basement into a darkroom for his photography hobby. It became storage space--until February.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By August Brown
The ugly subculture of neo-Nazi punk rock is back in the news after the shooting at a Sikh temple near Milwaukee. But within the punk community itself, many voices have loudly opposed this strain over the decades and worked to combat it with music. Jello Biafra , the founder of the pioneering Bay Area punk band Dead Kennedys, label owner and one of the most outspoken leftist activists in music, wrote perhaps the defining anti-Nazi punk anthem in 1981. We can't print its title, but we spoke with Biafra -- who now fronts Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine -- about the history of Nazi punk and his own legacy in opposing it. A condensed and lightly edited transcript of his remarks follows: I wrote that song in 1981, and at the time, it was aimed at people who were really violent on the dance floor; they didn't call it mosh pits yet. It began to attract people showing up just to see if they could get in fights in the pit or jump off stage and punch people in the back of the head and run away.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By August Brown
The ugly subculture of neo-Nazi punk rock is back in the news after the shooting at a Sikh temple near Milwaukee. But within the punk community itself, many voices have loudly opposed this strain over the decades and worked to combat it with music. Jello Biafra , the founder of the pioneering Bay Area punk band Dead Kennedys, label owner and one of the most outspoken leftist activists in music, wrote perhaps the defining anti-Nazi punk anthem in 1981. We can't print its title, but we spoke with Biafra -- who now fronts Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine -- about the history of Nazi punk and his own legacy in opposing it. A condensed and lightly edited transcript of his remarks follows: I wrote that song in 1981, and at the time, it was aimed at people who were really violent on the dance floor; they didn't call it mosh pits yet. It began to attract people showing up just to see if they could get in fights in the pit or jump off stage and punch people in the back of the head and run away.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2012 | By August Brown
Among the many sad details coming to light about Wade Michael Page, the suspected shooter in the Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting, is a deep involvement with a repellent strain of white-power punk music. The 40-year-old Wade played in a fascist hard-core group called End Apathy. According to an interview that he gave to the website for the Label 56 recording label ( Slate's Dave Weigel has excerpts ), Page also was affiliated with a number of negligible white-power bands with names like Celtic Warrior, Max Resist and Blue Eyed Devils, whose music can still occasionally be found on YouTube.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1979, it became obvious that punk rock had penetrated some of Southern California's more sedate precincts. The proof was a record album called "Beach Blvd," a compilation of 15 raw, speedily played but often catchy songs by three different suburban punk acts: The Crowd from Huntington Beach, Rik L Rik from Covina, and the Simpletones from Rosemead. Championed on KROQ-FM by disc jockey Rodney Bingenheimer, "Beach Blvd" established that there was punk life in suburbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2012 | By August Brown
Among the many sad details coming to light about Wade Michael Page, the suspected shooter in the Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting, is a deep involvement with a repellent strain of white-power punk music. The 40-year-old Wade played in a fascist hard-core group called End Apathy. According to an interview that he gave to the website for the Label 56 recording label ( Slate's Dave Weigel has excerpts ), Page also was affiliated with a number of negligible white-power bands with names like Celtic Warrior, Max Resist and Blue Eyed Devils, whose music can still occasionally be found on YouTube.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sex Pistols used to scowl about "no future," but Joe Escalante has seen punk-rock future and for him it's spelled c-i-n-e-m-a. "I'm 37 now--how long can you keep playing in a punk-rock band?" asks Escalante, a founding member of the veteran Orange County/Long Beach group the Vandals. "This movie thing is something I've learned to do and it's something I could see doing after I'm not in a band."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Night Moves is pulling the plug on the loud, edgy, punk-oriented rock that had been the club's staple for five years. The club will have a last fling with alternative rock music in shows tonight by Superficial Love (the name that the original members of T.S.O.L. now play under) and Saturday by Tender Fury. After that, Night Moves, at 5902 Warner Ave., will close for three weeks of remodeling, then reopen under a new, still undecided, name.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Social and political awareness has long fueled some of the best and most intense rock, especially in the genres of rap and punk. L.A.'s Downset draws from both areas, making it a sort of urban hard-core band, and delivers a strong mix of music and message on its recent major-label debut, "Downset."
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | DOUG LIST
In the aftermath of the explosion of punk music and its accompanying lifestyle in the mid-70s to early 1980s, Hollywood began cranking out teen movies like never before. Yet there is no real correlation to be made between the two movements since filmmakers all but ignored the punk phenomenon and the culture it molded.
NEWS
April 21, 2005 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda, Special to The Times
Veteran promoter Darryl Potter says he's doing it for the kids. The South Bay rock music mainstay, along with partner Eddie Amago, has created a safe environment to see old- and new-school bands at the Rock It Cafe, a Hawthorne bar and restaurant with a skate-punk heart. "Punk rock got really ugly in the South Bay from '85 to '90," Potter says. "It started to be about gangs and it wasn't fun anymore. If you were a nobody, you got hassled, and if you were a somebody, you had to fight.
MAGAZINE
October 17, 2004 | Howard Libes, Howard Libes last wrote for the magazine about skateboarding icon Stacy Peralta.
In the winter of 1977, 20-year-old Mike Watt drove from San Pedro with his friend Dennes Boon and discovered punk rock at the Hollywood clubs. While watching bands such as the Germs and X, they realized that maybe a place existed for them in the music world. They had grown up seeing big acts at arena rock shows, so experiencing these bands up close brought the musicians down to earth. The players were around their age, and most of the songs were original and true to the artists' experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2003 | Andy Olsen, Times Staff Writer
Rachel Bates Freed would never dream of letting her uncool mom tag along to a punk rock festival. But the 14-year-old can't drive, and the concert was too far for walking. Baby-sitting was the answer. Rachel's mom, Betsy, 45, and dozens of other parents found refuge from the noise of the Warped Tour 2003's visit to Ventura in the air-conditioned calm of a "reverse day-care" tent, complete with sound-proof headphones and a big-screen television.
NEWS
January 30, 2003 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
A log cabin is probably one of the last places on the planet you'd expect to see and hear mod punk rockers, but once a month the Bigfoot Lodge in Atwater becomes just the place for neighborhood regulars to mingle with retro girls, greaser boys, mods and punk rock kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, Randy Lewis is a Times staff writer
Punk rock exploded with raw energy, adolescent anger and primitive musical passion, but there was one thing it was never supposed to have: longevity. Yet a quarter-century after its shooting-star arrival, punk bands old and new are still putting out records at an undiminished rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sex Pistols used to scowl about "no future," but Joe Escalante has seen punk-rock future and for him it's spelled c-i-n-e-m-a. "I'm 37 now--how long can you keep playing in a punk-rock band?" asks Escalante, a founding member of the veteran Orange County/Long Beach group the Vandals. "This movie thing is something I've learned to do and it's something I could see doing after I'm not in a band."
NEWS
April 21, 2005 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda, Special to The Times
Veteran promoter Darryl Potter says he's doing it for the kids. The South Bay rock music mainstay, along with partner Eddie Amago, has created a safe environment to see old- and new-school bands at the Rock It Cafe, a Hawthorne bar and restaurant with a skate-punk heart. "Punk rock got really ugly in the South Bay from '85 to '90," Potter says. "It started to be about gangs and it wasn't fun anymore. If you were a nobody, you got hassled, and if you were a somebody, you had to fight.
NEWS
January 30, 2003 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
A log cabin is probably one of the last places on the planet you'd expect to see and hear mod punk rockers, but once a month the Bigfoot Lodge in Atwater becomes just the place for neighborhood regulars to mingle with retro girls, greaser boys, mods and punk rock kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Bishop once got thrown off the Southern California airwaves for playing the Sex Pistols' "God Save the Queen" on his weekly radio show, but he has stuck around to have the last laugh. In those days--1977--Bishop, who hailed from Costa Mesa, was known as John Q. Public.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1995 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Remember the heyday of punk rock, when such unruly bands as Black Flag, Bad Religion and the Dead Kennedys sawed off your ears with dissonant, often-deafening layers of noise? The violent, turbulent punk atmosphere of the 1980s has recently given way to the near-mainstream, more radio-friendly sounds of the Offsprings and Green Days, whose traces of melodious power-pop push for equality alongside discordant guitar thrashing and feedback.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|