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NEWS
February 19, 2004 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda, Special to the Times
EYES closed, facing the crowd, Alex Flynn of 1208 rips into a fierce anthem called "Next Big Thing." In front of him, a wiry mix of Redondo Beach surfers, punks and skaters sing about the sinister music industry right along with him, even though 1208's album, "Turn of the Screw," won't be released for four more days.
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FOOD
April 25, 2014 | Jonathan Gold
The night of the lunar eclipse, I was having a late supper at Red Medicine out on Wilshire, a few tables over from a man who had decided to dress as Jesus for the evening, a slender young man with long, straight hair and white robes flowing around his ankles. I can't be sure, but I think he ordered the tasting menu. After dinner, I walked outside in time to see the last sliver of the moon disappear into the Earth's shadow. An elderly man plucked at my arm, eager to know what I was looking up at, and I pointed at the moon, at Mars shining bright and pink in its penumbra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Hollywood do-it-yourself rock is back in the big time. The Ringling Sisters, which includes former members of the Bangles and the Screaming Sirens--two key female groups of L.A.'s early-'80s grass-roots movement--has released "60 Watt Reality." The album, on Ode Records through A&M, is the first big-label release from a representative of that milieu in ages. But though the faces may be familiar, the attitudes and sounds--a mix of semi-folky-rock and spoken-word pieces--may not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
Former professional skateboarder and punk rock singer Duane Peters was sentenced Wednesday to five years' probation after pleading guilty to a domestic violence charge. Peters, 52, known as "The Master of Disaster," was charged in February with assaulting his girlfriend at their Long Beach home, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. An Orange County native, Peters  gained fame for helping pioneer radical skateboarding moves. He has been credited as among the first skaters to do a 360-degree loop, called “the loop of death,” and for inventing such tricks as “the Fake and Thruster” and “the Indy Air.” Peters embraced punk rock, and his skate-punk style had a strong influence on the skateboarding world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1999 | ROBIN RAUZI
The debate rages on about where and when punk started: London in '75? Detroit in '68? New York in '64? In any case, punk landed in Southern California in the mid-'70s, when Los Angeles and Orange counties grabbed it and, in true do-it-yourself fashion, twisted it into distinct scenes and sounds. The local music scene hasn't been the same since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
This post has been corrected. See item below. On a Tuesday night in October 1978, a struggling restaurant in Chinatown decided to try some new music. Madame Wong's was having trouble finding customers with a regular Polynesian dance floor show. So proprietor Esther Wong, with some convincing, gave the stage to two punk rock bands. Guitars wailed. Drums crashed. Eggrolls were served. A new venue for Los Angeles punk rock was born. The late 1970s were a golden time for punk rock in Southern California, but traditional music venues looked down on the budding genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2011 | By Jason Gelt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Today, you can't escape punk rock ? the style, iconography and chord changes are as accessible as Hot Topic and top-40 radio. But punk continues to draw its power from the scene of the late 1970s and early '80s, particularly here in Southern California, and to build on its legacy as a savage underground protest music and an art movement that refused to be defined by money. On Friday, art gallery Subliminal Projects opens a new show of photography, art and ephemera called "Too Fast to Live, Too Young to Die," which throws open the chaotic energy of an early punk scene that included such bands as Black Flag, the Minutemen, Redd Kross, Bad Religion, the Germs and others.
NEWS
October 6, 2005
Far removed from the cozy confines where it used to ply its punk-rock trade, Green Day is doing what was once unimaginable for a band from its world: headlining stadiums. Of course, everything has been uncharted territory for the Bay Area band lately, from the resounding critical response to last year's ambitious and pointed "American Idiot" to the best-rock-album Grammy it received.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1997 | DAWN HOBBS
Punk rock will be the theme of the second Teen Concert on Saturday at the Camarillo Community Center. More than 200 teens are expected at the concert, scheduled from 8 p.m. to midnight. It's a way to provide Camarillo youths with a safe and fun Saturday night, according to event sponsors. Bands featured will be the Missing 23rd, No Motiv, Punk Ameoba, The Switch and Good for Nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2002 | LINA LECARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The menacing spirit of punk rock has been enveloped by a kinder, gentler pop sensibility these days, but Friday's concert at the Palace featuring San Diego's Unwritten Law, Chicago's Mest and Santa Barbara's Sugarcult showed that the current wave of punk doesn't lack power. Serving up infectious, Cheap Trick-meets-Elvis Costello sounds from its recent album, "Start Static," Sugarcult was an energetic whirlwind of hooks and harmonies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014
Tony Benn Renounced title to stay in House of Commons Tony Benn, 88, a committed British socialist who irritated and fascinated Britons through a political career spanning more than five decades and who renounced his aristocratic title rather than leave the House of Commons, died March 14 at his home in west London, his family said in a statement. No cause was given. Benn held cabinet posts in Labour Party governments in the 1970s and clung unswervingly to his leftist beliefs while his party, in opposition, moved to the center and reemerged to take power again as New Labour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
This post has been corrected. See item below. On a Tuesday night in October 1978, a struggling restaurant in Chinatown decided to try some new music. Madame Wong's was having trouble finding customers with a regular Polynesian dance floor show. So proprietor Esther Wong, with some convincing, gave the stage to two punk rock bands. Guitars wailed. Drums crashed. Eggrolls were served. A new venue for Los Angeles punk rock was born. The late 1970s were a golden time for punk rock in Southern California, but traditional music venues looked down on the budding genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By August Brown
The hotel room was destroyed. A television lay shattered on the ground, surrounded by a shredded pile of photographs and Bible pages, soda cans and broken furniture. On the mangled hotel bed, the sheets were coiled up in a corner, still holding the form of the human responsible for this mess. Just down the hall, Billy Idol and guys from the Sex Pistols, Blondie and Adam & the Ants banged out loud and sloppy Stooges covers late into the night. It's a scene Sid Vicious might have loved if he'd lived to attend the Los Angeles art opening.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Tina Susman
NEW YORK - They said they sang in English instead of Farsi because they wanted their music to be heard by the world, but their secret performance space in Tehran was padded with Styrofoam so they wouldn't be arrested for playing forbidden music. Their shows in Iran sometimes had lookouts, and the rockers had to ask fans to come but not to bring their friends, lest they attract too much attention. In other words, they were as punk rock as punk rock gets. But when the band known as the Yellow Dogs eventually fled Tehran to escape repression and claim their slice of indie glory in Brooklyn, tragedy followed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013
A fast-paced, thoroughly entertaining if hardly trenchant show biz documentary, "Broadway Idiot" traces how Green Day's Grammy Award-winning concept album/rock opera "American Idiot" was turned into a "Rent"-like stage musical and brought to the Great White Way with seemingly little discord or drama. If there was, in fact, any conflict or tension between the 2010 musical's director Michael Mayer and Green Day frontman Billie Joe Armstrong (they co-wrote the show's book) - much less any issues with or among the cast, crew or producers (the latter go oddly unseen here)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
Mick Farren, the British rocker, science-fiction writer, social critic and provocateur who embodied the rebellious spirit of the counterculture throughout a career that ranged from Britain's underground music clubs to Los Angeles' alternative journalism scene, died July 27 in London. He was 69. Farren was performing with his band, the Deviants, when he collapsed from a heart attack, said longtime friend Wayne Kramer, former guitarist of the Detroit band the MC5. "He couldn't have written it better," said Kramer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By August Brown
The hotel room was destroyed. A television lay shattered on the ground, surrounded by a shredded pile of photographs and Bible pages, soda cans and broken furniture. On the mangled hotel bed, the sheets were coiled up in a corner, still holding the form of the human responsible for this mess. Just down the hall, Billy Idol and guys from the Sex Pistols, Blondie and Adam & the Ants banged out loud and sloppy Stooges covers late into the night. It's a scene Sid Vicious might have loved if he'd lived to attend the Los Angeles art opening.
FOOD
April 25, 2014 | Jonathan Gold
The night of the lunar eclipse, I was having a late supper at Red Medicine out on Wilshire, a few tables over from a man who had decided to dress as Jesus for the evening, a slender young man with long, straight hair and white robes flowing around his ankles. I can't be sure, but I think he ordered the tasting menu. After dinner, I walked outside in time to see the last sliver of the moon disappear into the Earth's shadow. An elderly man plucked at my arm, eager to know what I was looking up at, and I pointed at the moon, at Mars shining bright and pink in its penumbra.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2013 | By Cale Ottens and Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Aspiring punk-rock and alternative bands packed patrons into grungy Al's Bar in downtown Los Angeles throughout the 1980s and 1990s, making it one of the West Coast's best-known venues for hearing edgy music of the era. Well-known performers such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nirvana, the Fall, Sonic Youth, Beck and the Misfits all strode the modest stage in the dive bar at 303 S. Hewitt St. before they made it big. The bar closed in 2001 but...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
An all-day punk-rock bill scheduled for March 30 at the Echo in Los Angeles has been called off because club officials were concerned about it attracting skinhead fans, according to a statement issued by one of the organizers of the Insta Fest show for which Channel 3, Old Firm Casuals, Toughskins and Custom Fit were among more than a dozen acts that had been booked. “ The Echo at the last minute realized that some of the bands playing Insta Fest had band members and fans they referred to as 'the skinhead element' and they do not want those types in their establishment.,” Joseph Gaughan of Inst Fest co-sponsor Durty Mick Records label posted on the event's Facebook page . “They now have decided to cancel this show two weeks before it was meant to happen.” Echo management has declined to comment, and the club's Web site is now advertising only a weekly “Funky Sole” soul music promotion on that night.
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