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Pure Energy Corp

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BUSINESS
August 23, 1996
L.L. Knickerbocker Co., a marketer of collectible dolls and teddy bears, said its affiliate, Pure Energy Corp., has hired Merrick Andlinger, an investment banker in New York City, to be president and chief executive. Andlinger will work for the Rancho Santa Margarita firm from a New York office. Pure Energy, with seven employees, is developing a low-cost alternative fuel source made from "societal waste."
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BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | Dow Jones
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. has acquired a 6.7% interest in Phoenix Environmental Ltd., a development stage company whose technology converts steel mill byproducts and other steel-based waste streams into a marketable industrial product. Lake Forest-based Knickerbocker said Monday that it will exchange 2% of its holdings in Pure Energy Corp. for the Phoenix Environmental stake, which it said is currently valued at about $40 million.
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BUSINESS
May 30, 1996
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. said Donaldson Lufkin & Jenrette has agreed to provide investment banking services for Knickerbocker's affiliate, Pure Energy Corp. Knickerbocker, which owns 40% of Pure Energy, markets celebrity-endorsed products through home shopping and the Internet. These include Marie Osmond dolls and Annette Funicello teddy bears. Pure Energy develops alternate fuel sources.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1998 | Dow Jones
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. Inc. said it sold 2.45% of its stake in Pure Energy Corp. to Pure Energy founders Douglas and Scott Dunlop for $3.4 million. Knickerbocker chief executive Louis L. Knickerbocker resigned as chairman of Pure Energy but remains a director. Lake Forest-based L.L. Knickerbocker, which sells collectibles, jewelry and other products, retains about a 35% stake in Pure Energy, which markets alternative fuels.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1998 | Dow Jones
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. Inc. said it sold 2.45% of its stake in Pure Energy Corp. to Pure Energy founders Douglas and Scott Dunlop for $3.4 million. Knickerbocker chief executive Louis L. Knickerbocker resigned as chairman of Pure Energy but remains a director. Lake Forest-based L.L. Knickerbocker, which sells collectibles, jewelry and other products, retains about a 35% stake in Pure Energy, which markets alternative fuels.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | Dow Jones
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. has acquired a 6.7% interest in Phoenix Environmental Ltd., a development stage company whose technology converts steel mill byproducts and other steel-based waste streams into a marketable industrial product. Lake Forest-based Knickerbocker said Monday that it will exchange 2% of its holdings in Pure Energy Corp. for the Phoenix Environmental stake, which it said is currently valued at about $40 million.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1996
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. is acquiring 40% of Pure Energy Corp., which is developing alternative fuels to reduce emissions. Terms were not disclosed. Knickerbocker President Louis Knickerbocker also will become chairman and chief executive officer of privately held Pure Energy, which was founded in 1994 by Douglas and Scott Dunlop. L.L. Knickerbocker markets a variety of products, including collector dolls, on television.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1996 | GREG JOHNSON
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. stock soared 43% Thursday to close at $14.125, up $4.25 per share in Nasdaq trading, but the company offered no explanation for the sudden jump. The increase followed a relative period of quiet at the company that, just a year ago, saw its shares rocket to $52 from a low of $4. The company that markets a wide variety of products for other companies completed a 5-for-1 stock split in 1995 and, early this year, the stock was trading at about $8.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997
L.L. Knickerbocker Co., which markets collectibles, jewelry and accessories and consumer products, reported a loss of $561,000, or 3 cents a share, for the second quarter, contrasted with profit of $758,000, or 5 cents a share, a year earlier. The company said expenses increased primarily because of jewelry manufacturing operations purchased in 1996. Revenue more than doubled to $17.6 million from $7.4 million as the company's production increased.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1998 | Leslie Earnest
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. Inc. said Tuesday it has formed a new corporation to manage the investment arm of the business. The Lake Forest maker of collectible dolls and jewelry said it plans to appoint three outside investment advisors to run the new corporation, Knickerbocker Investments Inc. With the core business split from its equity investments, Wall Street can research and value the two entities independently, eliminating confusion, the company said. The move also allows L.L.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1996
L.L. Knickerbocker Co., a marketer of collectible dolls and teddy bears, said its affiliate, Pure Energy Corp., has hired Merrick Andlinger, an investment banker in New York City, to be president and chief executive. Andlinger will work for the Rancho Santa Margarita firm from a New York office. Pure Energy, with seven employees, is developing a low-cost alternative fuel source made from "societal waste."
BUSINESS
May 30, 1996
L.L. Knickerbocker Co. said Donaldson Lufkin & Jenrette has agreed to provide investment banking services for Knickerbocker's affiliate, Pure Energy Corp. Knickerbocker, which owns 40% of Pure Energy, markets celebrity-endorsed products through home shopping and the Internet. These include Marie Osmond dolls and Annette Funicello teddy bears. Pure Energy develops alternate fuel sources.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Was it something Louis L. Knickerbocker said at his company's first annual meeting of shareholders two weeks ago? Since then, shares of collectibles maker L.L. Knickerbocker Co. have dropped nearly 28% on the Nasdaq market system. The stock recorded its steepest decline Wednesday--$1.25 a share--to close at $9.50. At one point Wednesday, the price fell to $8 a share--less than half of its all-time high of $16.25 a share, reached less than seven weeks ago.
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