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October 8, 2009 | Michael Ordona
Fittingly for an actress who has already shown remarkable range, the petite, blond Jess Weixler's face can change radically. Depending on the angle, the moment or the character, she can go from pretty to harsh, innocent to murderous. In the chaotically sequenced romantic drama "Peter and Vandy," she puts on display the many facets of what she calls "a whole person." "It feels so much better to act when you're not just part of a person; you're not just trying to be charming or lovable," she says, warming her hands on a double shot of green tea. "Stuff is going to fly out of you."
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SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | By Marty O'Brien
RICHMOND - For sheer memorability, the Toyota Owners 400 earned its place on the list of unforgettable Sprint Cup Series races at Richmond International Raceway. Crazy start. Twenty lead changes. Multiple car fires. Great beat-and-bang finish. The 400-lap, 300-mile race never failed to offer the kind of Saturday night short-track atmosphere so many fans crave, and even threw in a good fistfight afterward. Joey Logano emerged victorious in a multi-car battle for the checkered flag over the final laps, with Jeff Gordon second, Kyle Busch third, Brad Keselowski fourth and Matt Kenseth fifth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Michael Ordona
Ben Foster is standing on a boulder in a field in Armenia. That's not some trendy new Zen practice and he's not shooting a scene (although he's there working on "Here," his next film); he's just trying to manage some decent cell reception. Normally soft-spoken, he gamely shouts into the wind about his turn as an Army casualty notification officer in Oren Moverman's "The Messenger." "If you can remove the filter of war, it's about feelings we all have -- falling in love with someone in a difficult situation; we've all experienced loss; we will make the phone call to loved ones and have to break the news.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and David Undercoffler
Toyota Motor Corp. plans to move large numbers of jobs from its sales and marketing headquarters in Torrance to suburban Dallas, according to a person familiar with the automaker's plans. The move, creating a new North American headquarters, would put management of Toyota's U.S. business close to where it builds most cars for this market. North American Chief Executive Jim Lentz is expected to brief employees Monday, said the person, who was not authorized to speak publicly. Toyota declined to detail its plans.
OPINION
October 15, 2002
Regarding the Oct. 10 letter proposing "fingerprinting" of guns by the markings they make on bullets and shell casings: This would not work. A few seconds with a file will change the profile any barrel puts on a bullet. Not only that, rifling marks change with wear and time. Dream on about catching terrorists by destroying American rights. Chris Keller Alhambra
SPORTS
April 10, 2004
The Times reports that "UCLA will run basically the same version of Dorrell's West Coast offense that it used last season, [although] much of the terminology has changed." That made me think of a joke: A guy goes to the refrigerator and takes the milk out. It's gone bad. He puts it back, saying, "Maybe it'll be better tomorrow." Oh, how I miss Bob Toledo. Ken Haymaker Woodland Hills
SPORTS
February 1, 1986
Thank you, Chicago Bears. You gave us a 300-pound offensive back who runs for touchdowns, a quarterback who wears gloves indoors, a Hall of Fame running back who is not concerned with personal statistics, a defense that puts eight barking men on the line, a Super Bowl victory when you were supposed to, and a coach who directed you to come out throwing in the second half with a 20-point lead. Best of all, you put a spark of life to what had been one of the most predictable and boring events ever devised--professional football.
AUTOS
July 12, 2006 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
A new bill of rights for California car buyers provides grace periods for used-car purchases, caps dealer compensation on loans and features other provisions that are some of the strongest consumer protections in the country, according to state legislators and consumer advocates. The law, which went into effect July 1, applies to motor vehicles bought in California from a dealer for personal, family or household use.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | MARTIN FACKLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mrs. Liu could have had three daughters by now. But the shame and legal costs would have been unbearable, so she gave her second daughter away at birth and aborted a third when an ultrasound scan showed that fetus, too, was female. In 1949, the Communist Party took power promising to end centuries of degradation for China's women. Yet hundreds of thousands of unwanted baby girls are abandoned, aborted and even killed each year. For poor, rural families, the choice is as stark as it is cruel.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest - the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Here is what we found at Northridge: Above the desk on the left side of his office is an acknowledgment of what Marcelo Leonardi considers to be his proudest accomplishment as Cal State Northridge's women's water polo coach.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Guitarist Dave Navarro of Jane's Addiction and "Ink Master" fame has put his Hollywood loft up for sale at $899,000. The 1,570-square-foot unit features black glass-beaded wallpaper in the entry, 15-foot ceilings, blackout curtains and views of the Capitol Records building and the Hollywood sign. "It was one big space," said decorator Heidi Toll, who worked with Navarro to design the loft. So they carved out rooms within the open-plan space by using different finishes and features.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- The only candidate running for president against Egypt's former military chief, Abdel Fattah Sisi, has reportedly said that if elected he would put Sisi on trial in connection with the deaths of hundreds of protesters. "I don't treat Sisi as a criminal, but I plan to bring him to court …. When I do this, I aim to heal wounds without opening up new confrontations," candidate Hamdeen Sabahi was quoted as saying by the Egyptian news outlet Youm7 on Friday. Sabahi's campaign denied the comments were his. But Youm7 posted an audio recording of a voice that sounded much like the candidate.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Marty O'Brien
RICHMOND -- Kyle Larson's meteoric rise in the Sprint Cup Series continued Friday with an assist from Mother Nature. When qualifying for the Toyota Owners 400 was canceled because of rain, Larson earned the first pole of his Cup career because he had posted the fastest lap in the first practice on the three-quarters of a mile oval at Richmond International Raceway: 126.880 mph. He will start on the front row with Brad Keselowski, whose fastest lap...
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Barbara Demick
SEOUL - As he hops around the Western Pacific this week, President Obama hopes to unite much of Asia around a free-trade deal, updated alliances and a new power balance. But he first must persuade two of America's closest allies to stop squabbling. Jetting from Tokyo to Seoul on Friday morning, his second stop on the trip, Obama was between two nations mired in an old feud. South Koreans are furious over what they perceive as inadequate remorse from Japan over its brutal colonization of their nation from 1910 to 1945 and its use of Korean "comfort women" as sex slaves during World War II. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Korean President Park Geun-hye have traded slights and diplomatic digs for months.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Yuriko Nagano and Julie Makinen
TOKYO -- Hiroshi Kyoso says he values Japan's relationship with the United States highly and feels warmly about Washington's new ambassador to Tokyo, Caroline Kennedy. But as the 90-year-old veteran of World War II arrived Wednesday morning to pray at Tokyo's Yasukuni shrine -- a controversial site that commemorates nearly 2.5 million of Japan's war dead including 14 top war criminals -- Kyoso said he saw no connection between the shrine and Japan's ties with America. If a Japanese leader visits Yasukuni, he said, it's only natural.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Riccardi is a Times staff writer.
In June, leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints made a fateful decision. They called on California Mormons to donate their time and money to the campaign for Proposition 8, which would overturn a state Supreme Court ruling that permitted gay marriage. That push helped the initiative win narrow passage on election day. And it has made the Mormon Church, which for years has striven to be seen as part of the American mainstream, a political target.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
The Santa Monica Museum of Art's annual Incognito benefit may be the most democratic of all Los Angeles art world soirees: 700 works for sale by emerging and famous artists alike, all 10 by 10 inches and exactly $350 - with the artists' identities hidden from view until after purchase. But that doesn't mean strategy isn't involved. The event, which turns 10 this year, has become a touchstone for collectors looking to find valuable works by the likes of Barbara Kruger, Raymond Pettibon and Ed Ruscha.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti and his wife, Amy Wakeland, have put the home they own in Silver Lake up for one-year lease at $8,500 a month. Built in 2010, the boxy contemporary features an open living room, dining room, media room, office/gym, six bedrooms and five bathrooms in 4,000 square feet of living space. The top-level master suite has views of the reservoir. Concrete counters and a walk-in pantry are among amenities in the sleek kitchen. There are multiple decks. The street just got a fresh coat of slurry, so it would appear the place is ready for new occupants.
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