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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2009 | Michael Ordona
Fittingly for an actress who has already shown remarkable range, the petite, blond Jess Weixler's face can change radically. Depending on the angle, the moment or the character, she can go from pretty to harsh, innocent to murderous. In the chaotically sequenced romantic drama "Peter and Vandy," she puts on display the many facets of what she calls "a whole person." "It feels so much better to act when you're not just part of a person; you're not just trying to be charming or lovable," she says, warming her hands on a double shot of green tea. "Stuff is going to fly out of you."
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
  P ink is taking another shot at selling a home she owns in Sherman Oaks, this time priced at $3.499 million. The three-time Grammy winner, who sang "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" at the Oscars this year, listed the gated property at $4 million three years ago or for lease at $8,500 a month. She ended up with a tenant instead of a buyer. The two-story home has been leased out for as much as $10,000 a month. The Spanish-style house, built in 1946, features hand-hewn double entry doors and a two-story foyer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Michael Ordona
Ben Foster is standing on a boulder in a field in Armenia. That's not some trendy new Zen practice and he's not shooting a scene (although he's there working on "Here," his next film); he's just trying to manage some decent cell reception. Normally soft-spoken, he gamely shouts into the wind about his turn as an Army casualty notification officer in Oren Moverman's "The Messenger." "If you can remove the filter of war, it's about feelings we all have -- falling in love with someone in a difficult situation; we've all experienced loss; we will make the phone call to loved ones and have to break the news.
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein and Dan Wiederer
- Say this for Bubba Watson : He has a positive attitude. Despite shooting a two-over-par 74 in Saturday's third round of the Masters, the 2012 champion called it "all in all, a good day. " "The greens were the firmest I'd seen in years," Watson said. "I'm not too worried about what went on … and if I play bad [Sunday], I still have a green jacket. " Watson, who holds a share of the 54-hole lead at five under, left a flurry of putts short Saturday and three-putted two greens - two more than he had Thursday and Friday combined.
OPINION
October 15, 2002
Regarding the Oct. 10 letter proposing "fingerprinting" of guns by the markings they make on bullets and shell casings: This would not work. A few seconds with a file will change the profile any barrel puts on a bullet. Not only that, rifling marks change with wear and time. Dream on about catching terrorists by destroying American rights. Chris Keller Alhambra
SPORTS
April 10, 2004
The Times reports that "UCLA will run basically the same version of Dorrell's West Coast offense that it used last season, [although] much of the terminology has changed." That made me think of a joke: A guy goes to the refrigerator and takes the milk out. It's gone bad. He puts it back, saying, "Maybe it'll be better tomorrow." Oh, how I miss Bob Toledo. Ken Haymaker Woodland Hills
SPORTS
February 1, 1986
Thank you, Chicago Bears. You gave us a 300-pound offensive back who runs for touchdowns, a quarterback who wears gloves indoors, a Hall of Fame running back who is not concerned with personal statistics, a defense that puts eight barking men on the line, a Super Bowl victory when you were supposed to, and a coach who directed you to come out throwing in the second half with a 20-point lead. Best of all, you put a spark of life to what had been one of the most predictable and boring events ever devised--professional football.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013 | By Susan King
Richard Dreyfuss has a lot on his mind. And he's more than willing to share. Among his talking points: the beleaguered state of civics education and filmmaking today - most roles in new films are "stupid," he believes - studying at Oxford, directing John Gielgud and auditioning for Jack Nicholson's 1971 drama "Drive, He Said. " He has a story about that one. "I had gone out for one of the parts in 'Drive' and didn't get it, and I was all grumpy," said the 65-year-old Dreyfuss, who appeared trim and sprightly during a recent breakfast at a Brentwood hotel.
AUTOS
July 12, 2006 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
A new bill of rights for California car buyers provides grace periods for used-car purchases, caps dealer compensation on loans and features other provisions that are some of the strongest consumer protections in the country, according to state legislators and consumer advocates. The law, which went into effect July 1, applies to motor vehicles bought in California from a dealer for personal, family or household use.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | MARTIN FACKLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mrs. Liu could have had three daughters by now. But the shame and legal costs would have been unbearable, so she gave her second daughter away at birth and aborted a third when an ultrasound scan showed that fetus, too, was female. In 1949, the Communist Party took power promising to end centuries of degradation for China's women. Yet hundreds of thousands of unwanted baby girls are abandoned, aborted and even killed each year. For poor, rural families, the choice is as stark as it is cruel.
SPORTS
April 11, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
Nobody got hurt. The Lakers didn't lose by 50. There are only three games left. These were reasons for the Lakers to celebrate a 112-95 loss Friday to Golden State at Staples Center. The season that won't ever end is down to a handful of days. Nobody's complaining. No crying. Tension was sucked out of this season a month ago, if not longer. BOX SCORE: Golden State 112, Lakers 95 There's a lot of losing, though, six in a row for the Lakers (25-54) after a late run fell short, extending their team record for losses in a season.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
It has never been easier to eat high-end sushi than it is now in Los Angeles - to surrender two hours and half a month's rent to the choreographed roll of the waves. You can experience the masculine crispness of Mori or the postmodern wackiness of Wa; the gentle experimentation of Kiriko or the discofied modernism of Nobu Malibu; the gold leaf and truffle oil of Go's Mart or the intellectual approach of Kiyokawa. The idea of purist edomae sushi, or at least its rigor, is well-established here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A South Bay schools superintendent who attracted scrutiny for his $674,559 pay was placed on administrative leave this week, pending an internal investigation. The Centinela Valley Union High School District board voted 5-0 to suspend Supt. Jose Fernandez during an abruptly called, closed-door meeting at the Centinela Valley Center for the Arts in Lawndale on Wednesday evening. Fernandez's earnings last year surpassed the compensation of those leading the nation's largest school systems.
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
LAS VEGAS - Theories abound as to why Manny Pacquiao has gone seven fights since 2009 without knocking out an opponent. The effects of age on the 35-year-old, the talent and size of the opponents, conditioning flaws and distractions in his personal life and in his public life as a congressman in the Philippines are among the most cited reasons. Pacquiao's opponent Saturday at the MGM Grand, World Boxing Organization welterweight champion Timothy Bradley, has called out Pacquiao (55-5-2, 38 knockouts)
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Families of children with disabilities have sued Walt Disney Co. theme parks and resorts in Anaheim and Orlando, Fla., over a new policy allowing guests with disabilities quick access to rides and attractions. The suit, filed last week in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, alleges that the policy put in place in October is intended to discourage guests with disabilities from visiting the parks. Disney dismissed those claims. Before October, visitors with disabilities and their family members were given a card that allowed them to go directly onto rides, skipping long lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By David Zahniser and James Rainey
Three months after it painted L.A. as a metropolis stumbling into decline, the Los Angeles 2020 Commission offered 13 recommendations Wednesday that it said would attract jobs and "put the city on a path to fiscal stability. " The group of prominent business, labor and civic leaders called on elected officials to enact a wide-ranging series of policy initiatives: increasing the minimum wage, combining giant twin harbors into a single port, altering oversight of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and bolstering efforts to promote regional tourism.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014
Arthur Napoleon Raymond Robinson Former Trinidad and Tobago leader held by Islamic rebels Arthur Napoleon Raymond Robinson, 87, a former Trinidad and Tobago prime minister who was held hostage for days and shot during a bloody 1990 coup attempt, died Wednesday at a private medical center in Trinidad's capital of Port-of-Spain after a prolonged illness. National Security Minister Gary Griffith said Robinson had been hospitalized for several medical conditions related to diabetes.
WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - It can take Moscow residents two hours in dense traffic to drive the first 10 miles on the highway to St. Petersburg, in the direction of their country cottages surrounded by lakes and birch groves. Then the road's real limitations become apparent. The potholed two-lane route connecting Russia's two largest cities has never been upgraded into a proper highway. Anyone who cares to drive its entire 440-mile length - mostly truckers - will need at least 12 hours. But 5,600 miles away, the government spent more than $1 billion on less than a mile of bridge connecting Vladivostok with Russky Island, previously inhabited only by a military garrison so isolated that four soldiers starved to death in 1992.
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