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Pygmies

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Pygmies appear to have unusually low levels of an important protein involved in growth, possibly explaining why they are so short and offering clues to shortness in other groups, researchers reported Wednesday. A study involving 20 African Pygmies found they appear to have very low levels of growth hormone-binding protein, which may be why they fail to experience a growth spurt at puberty. "This is very exciting to me," said Dr.
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SCIENCE
March 14, 2014 | By Amina Khan
How's this for "death by cute?" Paleontologists have dug up a fearsome new dinosaur in a surprising place: Nanuqsaurus, a pygmy tyrannosaur that lived far away from its larger sharped-toothed cousins - in what is now Alaska. The newly named Nanuqsaurus hoglundi fossil, described in PLoS ONE, reveals that dinosaurs lived in the Arctic 70 million years ago, during a much warmer period in Earth's history. “The discovery of Nanuqsaurus hoglundi provides new insights into tyrannosaurid adaptability and evolution in an ancient greenhouse Arctic,” wrote study authors Anthony Fiorillo and Ronald Tykoski of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas.
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NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Clashes between pygmies and their neighbors in southwestern Uganda have left 20 dead in the last three weeks, the official New Vision newspaper said Tuesday. Police officers in Rukungiri told the government-owned paper that a group of pygmies set up a roadblock and fired arrows at their non-pygmy neighbors, killing five. The neighbors, armed with clubs, machetes and spears, retaliated and killed 15 pygmies.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Carla Hall
A rare pygmy three-toed sloth stirred an international controversy after officials of the Dallas World Aquarium caught and crated six of the creatures on Isla Escudo de Veraguas, an island off Panama. The aquarium officials intended to take the animals back to Dallas - and made it clear they had extensive paperwork and permits to do so - but were confronted at the Isla Colón International Airport in the Bocas del Toro province of Panama by protesters and police who barred them from leaving the airport with the sloths.
WORLD
July 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Pygmy musicians performing at an annual festival in the capital, Brazzaville, were put up in a tent in a zoo by officials, prompting a protest from a human rights group that said their presence has attracted tourists who stare and take pictures. Other performers were lodged in hotels. Officials said they wanted the 10 women, nine men and one baby to feel more at home.
NEWS
February 27, 1991
Iraq's U.N. ambassador broke the code of diplomacy recently when he personally attacked Kuwait's ambassador, calling him a pygmy. But the INSULT CAME BACK TO HAUNT HIM. Ambassador Abdul Amir Anbari was taken to task by the envoy from Zaire. Lectured Ambassador Bagbeni Adeito Nzengeya: "As the representative of Zaire, whose population is nearly 36 million, including 400,000 Pygmies enjoying all rights . . .
WORLD
January 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A six-member U.N. team is investigating reports that rebels killed and ate Pygmies in northeastern Congo, Manodje Mounoubai of the U.N. mission in Congo said. The team has been in Ituri province for a week, looking into the accusations that the Congolese Liberation Movement and the Congolese Rally for Democracy-National ate Pygmies. The factions often hire Pygmies to hunt food, a U.N. official said. If they return empty-handed, rebels reportedly kill and eat them, the official said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1985 | RICHARD CROMELIN
The deliberately naive art-folk music played by the quartet known enigmatically as 17 Pygmies is one of the most enticing sounds on the local pop scene. But the group's performance Sunday at McCabe's was a hit-and-miss affair that didn't expand on the promise of the recent "Jedda by the Sea" album. As charming as their music is, the Pygmies simply lack basic performing instincts.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends affectionately call him "King of the Pygmies." But Louis Sarno, a 6-foot-tall white American and a self-described lousy hunter, doesn't quite fit the mold. Nor does he want the title. What Sarno craves is the opportunity to live freely among a people he has come to love and respect. For the last 14 years, the New Jersey native has lived among the BaAka Pygmies in the southwestern corner of this country, documenting their customs, studying their language and recording their music.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The menacing mimicry of animal cries echoes through tangled rain forest from a band of diminutive human predators. Suddenly, frantic squeals ring out as a scrawny, wide-eyed antelope gets tangled in a net trap. A woman clobbers it with a stick. Two other antelopes meet the same fate this morning, a modest take compared with those of yesteryear. As they have done for more generations than anyone can remember, the Pygmies of the BaAka tribe are again on the hunt.
WORLD
January 1, 2013 | By Ralph Jennings, Los Angeles Times
XIANG TIAN HU, Taiwan - Chu Kuo-sheng danced for 24 hours in the cold mountain rain to draw attention to a seldom-discussed chapter of Taiwanese history. He linked arms with dozens of others, chanted and slowly shuffled across a field. About 600 people performed the exhausting ritual last weekend that honors a pygmy-like people, skin as dark as those from equatorial Africa, whom Chu's own tribe admits to exterminating in battle between 1,000 and 2,000 years ago. The ceremony, called Pasta'ay, is a tribute to a lost tribe of pygmies, who may have numbered 90,000 at their peak and resembled tribes living today in Papua New Guinea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
The discovery of what appears to be a full mammoth tusk on Santa Cruz Island has excited scientists and may offer a glimpse of California beach life during prehistoric times. Scientists believe 14-foot-tall mammoths swam out to the Channel Islands from the mainland nearly 20,000 years ago, possibly lured by the sweet smell of island grassland for grazing. Later stranded by rising sea levels, the animals shrank over time to a dwarf version.
WORLD
July 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Pygmy musicians performing at an annual festival in the capital, Brazzaville, were put up in a tent in a zoo by officials, prompting a protest from a human rights group that said their presence has attracted tourists who stare and take pictures. Other performers were lodged in hotels. Officials said they wanted the 10 women, nine men and one baby to feel more at home.
SCIENCE
June 23, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 2 million years ago, in lowland tropical forests of what is now China, there lived an ancestor of the giant panda that was very similar to the modern-day bear but was only about half its size, scientists said Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Researchers from the University of Iowa described a complete skull -- about 60% of the size of the modern panda -- and teeth of a pygmy-sized panda.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2007 | Lynn Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Two groups of tiny, dark-eyed, salt-and-pepper rabbits were released in a sagebrush field in eastern Washington last week, raising the population of Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits in the wild from zero to 20. They are the smallest rabbits in the United States and one of only two types in North America that dig their own burrows. Adults weigh about a pound, and measure a foot long.
OPINION
September 7, 2006 | David P. Barash, DAVID P. BARASH, an evolutionary biologist, is professor of psychology at the University of Washington.
'FACTS," according to one of Ronald Reagan's more notorious pronouncements, "are stupid things." In all fairness, Reagan had supposedly meant to say "stubborn." But in any event, facts can certainly be troublesome, especially when they require us to give up a cherished notion. Remember, for instance, in 2004, when anthropologists announced the discovery of fossil remains of members of the genus Homo on the island of Flores in Indonesia?
WORLD
January 1, 2013 | By Ralph Jennings, Los Angeles Times
XIANG TIAN HU, Taiwan - Chu Kuo-sheng danced for 24 hours in the cold mountain rain to draw attention to a seldom-discussed chapter of Taiwanese history. He linked arms with dozens of others, chanted and slowly shuffled across a field. About 600 people performed the exhausting ritual last weekend that honors a pygmy-like people, skin as dark as those from equatorial Africa, whom Chu's own tribe admits to exterminating in battle between 1,000 and 2,000 years ago. The ceremony, called Pasta'ay, is a tribute to a lost tribe of pygmies, who may have numbered 90,000 at their peak and resembled tribes living today in Papua New Guinea.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | GLENN McKENZIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A lifetime of stalking elephants and other jungle prey with bow and arrows has bent Angou's ancient body nearly double. His mouth is toothless, and he speaks in a frail, halting voice. Angou--who looks like he's in his 80s but doesn't know his age--has vivid memories of his childhood, when Europeans first slashed through the steamy rain forest and entered the realm of the Bongon Pygmy tribe.
NEWS
April 30, 2006 | Anjan Sundaram, Associated Press Writer
Pygmy chief Mbomba Bokenu says he may soon let loggers cut his people's forest, and all he expects in return is soap and a few bags of salt. "The Pygmies are suffering; we accept what we are given," said Bokenu, draped in brown civet-cat skins and holding a slender carved-wood shield. "Our children live in dirt, they suffer from disease. Soap and salt are a lot to our people."
NEWS
July 3, 2005 | Vijay Joshi, Associated Press Writer
Crouched in the vine-tangled forest of Borneo, where the brightest part of the day seems like dusk, Elis Tambing finally got the elusive animal in his laser sight and fired. The dart found its mark: the rump of an endangered pygmy elephant, found only in Malaysia's Sabah state. Two more shots and the gentle giant, nicknamed Taliwas after the forest where she lives, dozed off standing up, tranquilized for half an hour, ready to be electronically tagged.
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