Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPyles Boys Camp
IN THE NEWS

Pyles Boys Camp

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
February 28, 1999
Regarding your Feb. 19 article on a Florida experimental school to rescue at-risk boys, it should be noted that a somewhat similar program in Southern California has been turning around the lives of disadvantaged, at-risk boys for almost 50 years with little fanfare and without government funding of any kind. More than 20,000 youngsters have benefited from the R.M. Pyles Boys Camp program since its founding in 1949. While the Pyles program is not a school and certainly eschews the paramilitary approach of the Florida experiment, it has proven successful in bringing hope and a workable formula for a better life to boys throughout the Los Angeles area.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2011 | By Sophia Lee, Los Angeles Times
Isaac Araujo is the kind of young man who talks warmly to anyone and everyone, from the teachers in his school to the homeless people on the streets. But three years ago, the tall 15-year-old with impressive eyebrows and confident voice was a nervous, scared boy who couldn't keep down his breakfast before school and refused to sit between strangers at the pew during Mass. Isaac, who grew up in Highland Park, was bullied in middle school. His antagonists didn't hurt him physically, but the constant threats left damage: Isaac was plagued by a chronic fear that someone was out there to hurt him. His mother, Maria Araujo, worried about her son, so when she heard about R.M. Pyles Boys Camp, a nonprofit organization dedicated to developing good character traits in boys through a wilderness camping experience, she urged him to attend.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 12, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The light in her rustic mountain cabin flicks on at 3:50 a.m. The campers won't wake up for another three hours. Rose Urbina, 76, steps out into the dark forest, as she has each summer morning for four decades. It's a short walk to the kitchen, one in a collection of rust-dyed buildings that resembles an old logging camp in this Sierra Nevada basin. But the walk takes her a little longer these days. Cans are harder to open. More and more, she relies on the teenagers for help.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
For some inner city youths, summer camp is not just an opportunity to have fun and experience nature. It's the chance to get away from impoverished neighborhoods, street gangs, crime and the threat of jail time. Eddie Ramos has firsthand knowledge of the role camp can play in turning around a boy's life. His first lessons were at R.M. Pyles Boys Camp as a 14-year-old from East L.A. nicknamed "Wolf." As Ramos tells it, he was headed, as a kid, for a lifetime of trouble.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
For some inner city youths, summer camp is not just an opportunity to have fun and experience nature. It's the chance to get away from impoverished neighborhoods, street gangs, crime and the threat of jail time. Eddie Ramos has firsthand knowledge of the role camp can play in turning around a boy's life. His first lessons were at R.M. Pyles Boys Camp as a 14-year-old from East L.A. nicknamed "Wolf." As Ramos tells it, he was headed, as a kid, for a lifetime of trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1997 | KIMBERLY LISAGOR
At-risk teens are poised to benefit from a barbecue fund-raiser to be held Saturday at Soule Park in Ojai. Proceeds from the event will help send as many as 80 local boys to Pyles Boys' Camp, a rugged, two-week camping program aimed at instilling a sense of responsibility in disadvantaged youths. Live entertainment, a carnival and face painting will accompany traditional barbecue fare at the event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $12 per person, or $10 each for groups of 10 or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1985
Much political significance was attached in a Times story (July 22) to Mayor Tom Bradley's action-packed raft ride down the Kern River, "heavily covered by reporters." However, a greater human impact by the mayor occurred the day preceding when he returned to the R.M. Pyles Boys Camp located in the Sierras 30 miles above Kernville to present a plaque to the 15,000th camper over a 37-year span. This was not covered by major media. In 1949 Bradley was a rookie policeman on the Los Angeles Police Department and he and a fellow officer, Julio Gonzales (now a U.S. marshal)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1999 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the Sequoia National Forest stood a collection of unlikely campers. The boys, most no older than 14, wore basketball sneakers, baggy shorts, faded T-shirts and unmistakable chips on their slender shoulders. There was 12-year-old Joshua of Oxnard, who smiles politely at adults but had his first fistfight only a few hours after arriving at camp. His brother Jack, 14, was willing to give the forest thing a try.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2011 | By Sophia Lee, Los Angeles Times
Isaac Araujo is the kind of young man who talks warmly to anyone and everyone, from the teachers in his school to the homeless people on the streets. But three years ago, the tall 15-year-old with impressive eyebrows and confident voice was a nervous, scared boy who couldn't keep down his breakfast before school and refused to sit between strangers at the pew during Mass. Isaac, who grew up in Highland Park, was bullied in middle school. His antagonists didn't hurt him physically, but the constant threats left damage: Isaac was plagued by a chronic fear that someone was out there to hurt him. His mother, Maria Araujo, worried about her son, so when she heard about R.M. Pyles Boys Camp, a nonprofit organization dedicated to developing good character traits in boys through a wilderness camping experience, she urged him to attend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN
A Valencia-based nonprofit group that runs a camp for impoverished boys was recognized Wednesday as the 722nd "point of light" by President Bush. The Daily Point of Light Program was started by the President shortly after he took office in 1988 to promote volunteerism and encourage privately financed community service efforts. R. M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1999 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the Sequoia National Forest stood a collection of unlikely campers. The boys, most no older than 14, wore basketball sneakers, baggy shorts, faded T-shirts and unmistakable chips on their slender shoulders. There was 12-year-old Joshua of Oxnard, who smiles politely at adults but had his first fistfight only a few hours after arriving at camp. His brother Jack, 14, was willing to give the forest thing a try.
NEWS
July 12, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The light in her rustic mountain cabin flicks on at 3:50 a.m. The campers won't wake up for another three hours. Rose Urbina, 76, steps out into the dark forest, as she has each summer morning for four decades. It's a short walk to the kitchen, one in a collection of rust-dyed buildings that resembles an old logging camp in this Sierra Nevada basin. But the walk takes her a little longer these days. Cans are harder to open. More and more, she relies on the teenagers for help.
OPINION
February 28, 1999
Regarding your Feb. 19 article on a Florida experimental school to rescue at-risk boys, it should be noted that a somewhat similar program in Southern California has been turning around the lives of disadvantaged, at-risk boys for almost 50 years with little fanfare and without government funding of any kind. More than 20,000 youngsters have benefited from the R.M. Pyles Boys Camp program since its founding in 1949. While the Pyles program is not a school and certainly eschews the paramilitary approach of the Florida experiment, it has proven successful in bringing hope and a workable formula for a better life to boys throughout the Los Angeles area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1997 | KIMBERLY LISAGOR
At-risk teens are poised to benefit from a barbecue fund-raiser to be held Saturday at Soule Park in Ojai. Proceeds from the event will help send as many as 80 local boys to Pyles Boys' Camp, a rugged, two-week camping program aimed at instilling a sense of responsibility in disadvantaged youths. Live entertainment, a carnival and face painting will accompany traditional barbecue fare at the event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $12 per person, or $10 each for groups of 10 or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1985
Much political significance was attached in a Times story (July 22) to Mayor Tom Bradley's action-packed raft ride down the Kern River, "heavily covered by reporters." However, a greater human impact by the mayor occurred the day preceding when he returned to the R.M. Pyles Boys Camp located in the Sierras 30 miles above Kernville to present a plaque to the 15,000th camper over a 37-year span. This was not covered by major media. In 1949 Bradley was a rookie policeman on the Los Angeles Police Department and he and a fellow officer, Julio Gonzales (now a U.S. marshal)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Julio Gonzales, a pioneering Latino leader in Los Angeles Police Department community relations who later served on the board of the California Youth Authority and as U.S. marshal, has died. He was 86. Gonzales died Dec. 5 at a Long Beach hospice of causes related to aging, said his son, Steven.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|