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Pyromaniacs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a clear night in the San Fernando Valley. From Fire Station 73 on Reseda Boulevard the street lights form a bright, straight line that tapers off into the hills to the north. It is warm out and there is not much of a breeze. But Bill Cass and Glen Lucero wear light jackets over their black T-shirts anyway--to hide the guns holstered at their sides. Cass tests the undercover car's portable emergency light; the red strobe flashes across his face. He tunes the portable radio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2002
A jury found Tuesday that a pyromaniac was sane when he set a drunken man on fire in 1997. Jose Manuel Carranza, 22, of Sylmar faces 30 years to life for first-degree murder and arson. He killed Luciano Olmeda, 45, on May 18, 1997. If found insane, he could have been sent to a mental hospital, possibly for life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1991 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Suspected arsonist John L. Orr was regarded as a mentor and sage by many of his firefighting colleagues, a veteran arson investigator called upon by fire officials across Southern California who were stumped by a tough case. The Glendale fire captain taught seminars, wrote articles for trade publications and helped develop educational classes for statewide conferences of arson investigators. "He has a lot more experience than most of us in the area," said Burbank Fire Capt. Steve Patterson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995
An Arleta man suspected of setting more than 350 fires in the Los Angeles garment district pleaded not guilty Monday to 10 felony counts of arson. Victor Manuel Gomez, 38, was ordered to return to Los Angeles Municipal Court on April 6 for a preliminary hearing. The ex-garment district worker remains in custody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995
An Arleta man suspected of setting more than 350 fires in the Los Angeles garment district pleaded not guilty Monday to 10 felony counts of arson. Victor Manuel Gomez, 38, was ordered to return to Los Angeles Municipal Court on April 6 for a preliminary hearing. The ex-garment district worker remains in custody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr. and LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Arleta man who authorities say set 350 fires in the Downtown garment district that did more than $4 million in damage did so for the pleasure of seeing the fires, not for any financial gain, investigators said Thursday. "He's a classic pyro," Investigator John Little of the Los Angeles Fire Department's Arson Squad said of Victor Manuel Gomez, 38.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr. and LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Victor Manuel Gomez, the man authorities say set 350 fires in the Downtown garment district that did more than $4 million in damage over the past three years, did so for the pleasure of seeing the fires--not for any financial gain or personal vendetta, investigators said Thursday. "He's a classic pyro," Investigator John Little of the Los Angeles Fire Department's arson squad said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2002
A jury found Tuesday that a pyromaniac was sane when he set a drunken man on fire in 1997. Jose Manuel Carranza, 22, of Sylmar faces 30 years to life for first-degree murder and arson. He killed Luciano Olmeda, 45, on May 18, 1997. If found insane, he could have been sent to a mental hospital, possibly for life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990
Wild enthusiasm for baseball is one thing. But what could an Anaheim Hills Little League team manager have been thinking when he staged a jersey-burning incident on the pitcher's mound as a warm-up for a game with the league's best team? Randy L. Pangborn, the manager of the Yankees, a team of 10- to 12-year-olds, was described by his supporters as a workhorse who had done much good for the league. But he obviously got carried away Monday night.
FOOD
May 19, 2011 | By Amy Scattergood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of the most appealing things about open kitchens — and the trend of letting the rest of us see into the inner machinery, the smoke and clash and vaguely militaristic operation of a restaurant — is the occasional flare and whoosh of fire. We are, most of us, secret pyromaniacs. Watching a chef flambé something (a crepe, steak Diane, an apron) maintains the willing suspension of disbelief that professional cooking is, after all, a beautiful and possibly dangerous high-wire circus act and not just dinner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr. and LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Arleta man who authorities say set 350 fires in the Downtown garment district that did more than $4 million in damage did so for the pleasure of seeing the fires, not for any financial gain, investigators said Thursday. "He's a classic pyro," Investigator John Little of the Los Angeles Fire Department's Arson Squad said of Victor Manuel Gomez, 38.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr. and LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Victor Manuel Gomez, the man authorities say set 350 fires in the Downtown garment district that did more than $4 million in damage over the past three years, did so for the pleasure of seeing the fires--not for any financial gain or personal vendetta, investigators said Thursday. "He's a classic pyro," Investigator John Little of the Los Angeles Fire Department's arson squad said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1991 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Suspected arsonist John L. Orr was regarded as a mentor and sage by many of his firefighting colleagues, a veteran arson investigator called upon by fire officials across Southern California who were stumped by a tough case. The Glendale fire captain taught seminars, wrote articles for trade publications and helped develop educational classes for statewide conferences of arson investigators. "He has a lot more experience than most of us in the area," said Burbank Fire Capt. Steve Patterson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990
Wild enthusiasm for baseball is one thing. But what could an Anaheim Hills Little League team manager have been thinking when he staged a jersey-burning incident on the pitcher's mound as a warm-up for a game with the league's best team? Randy L. Pangborn, the manager of the Yankees, a team of 10- to 12-year-olds, was described by his supporters as a workhorse who had done much good for the league. But he obviously got carried away Monday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a clear night in the San Fernando Valley. From Fire Station 73 on Reseda Boulevard the street lights form a bright, straight line that tapers off into the hills to the north. It is warm out and there is not much of a breeze. But Bill Cass and Glen Lucero wear light jackets over their black T-shirts anyway--to hide the guns holstered at their sides. Cass tests the undercover car's portable emergency light; the red strobe flashes across his face. He tunes the portable radio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1987 | LEE SIEGEL, Associated Press
Spite and anger often motivate adults who commit arson only once, but chronic firebugs usually are passive loners who, experts say, seek power and thrills by making firefighters rush to the scene of the crimes. "They're just strange folks," said Ed Bodenlos, a U.S. Forest Service special agent who investigates arson in the Angeles National Forest and across the nation. "In most cases, they're withdrawn, quiet loners without friends or associates," Bodenlos said. "They didn't do well in school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2000 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fire experts say that some 500,000 fires reported annually are caused by arsonists, with damage estimated at $2 billion. In Orange County last year, more than $5.3 million in damage was caused by 758 arson fires--that's an average of more than two per day. In Orange County, only 71 of those fires have been cleared with a suspect either arrested or known. That's less than 10%, and just below the state clearance average.
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