Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPython
IN THE NEWS

Python

ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2009 | Christopher Smith
An English newspaper once described a soccer star as having "developed splendidly and then aged as well as could be hoped for." That might sum up another U.K. icon, Monty Python. Because while it's been 25 years since the seminal six-man English comedy troupe has produced any new material, its thoughtful silliness still resonates. Now the group is again among us, cheerfully exploiting its upcoming 40th anniversary with a Python-palooza of events on tap: a new play in Los Angeles based on its classic TV sketches, a six-part documentary on the IFC channel, a book describing its live performances and a rare coming together of the group's five living members for a Q&A session in New York.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
August 2, 2009 | Robert Nolin
Go ahead, stretch out in the soft grass. It's comfortable. You're surrounded by a smorgasbord of prey. You may belong half a world away, but here in the Everglades, life is good. Except you're a Burmese python, and the state wants to hunt you down and kill you. It hasn't put a bounty on your head, but it may as well have: If caught, you're decapitated. In this moonlit world of marsh, bug and fanged danger, snake hunter Jeff Fobb is top predator.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2009 | Associated Press
A pet Burmese python measuring more than 8 feet long broke out of a terrarium and strangled a 2-year-old girl in her bedroom Wednesday, authorities said. Shaiunna Hare was dead when paramedics arrived about 10 a.m., Lt. Bobby Caruthers of the Sumter County Sheriff's Office said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009 | Susan King
The American Cinematheque is ringing in the new year with a screening today at the Egyptian of the 1946 Frank Capra classic "It's a Wonderful Life," starring Jimmy Stewart, while the Aero goes Marxist with two zany Marx Brothers delights: 1935's "A Night at the Opera" and 1930's "Animal Crackers," in which Groucho performs his signature tune, "Hooray for Captain Spaulding." Capra fest Capra's politico films, 1939's "Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
No, of course, Brian Cohen is not the Messiah (you need to ask?). And at the Hollywood Bowl on Saturday night, we all knew very well, thank you, that "Not the Messiah (He's a Very Naughty Boy)" would not be "The Messiah." It's the bad-boy bit, though, that one wondered about in a merry mash-up between Handel and "Monty Python's Life of Brian" by Pythoner Eric Idle and conductor John Du Prez. The question was just how bad a boy Idle was prepared to be.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
With his biggest acquisition to date, Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Mark Hurd might prove how ruthless he can be. Since he took the helm three years ago, Hurd has driven the Palo Alto company back to the top of the computing industry by cutting costs. He's done it relentlessly and without sentimentality, repeating the efficiency mantra every quarter -- even as the company's fortunes improved.
NEWS
February 10, 2008 | Ker Munthit, Associated Press
Being responsible parents, rice farmer Khuorn Sam Ol and his wife might be expected to stop their child from playing with a 16-foot-long, 220-pound snake. Yet they don't mind that their 7-year-old son, Uorn Sambath, regularly sleeps in the massive coil of a female python, rides the reptile, kisses it and even pats it down with baby powder. "There is a special bond between them," Khuorn Sam Ol explained. "My son played with the snake when he was still learning to crawl. They used to sleep together in a cradle."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2008 | Noel Murray
According to John Cleese, the cult comedy troupe Monty Python was kicking around ideas at a London restaurant when member Eric Idle piped up with the title, "Jesus Christ: Lust for Glory." This inspired the brutally funny 1979 religious satire "Life of Brian," which is now set for a features-packed special-edition DVD re-release Tuesday. Python stalwart John Cleese recently phoned to discuss the enduring legacy -- and controversy -- surrounding Monty Python's most fully realized feature film.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|