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NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
Sen. John Kerry, who joined Sen. John McCain earlier this year in supporting the use of force to assist the Libyan rebels, praised the U.S. role in the conflict Thursday as deposed Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi was reported dead. Kadafi's death is a development that “marks the end of his reign of terror and the promise of a new Libya,” the Massachusetts Democrat said in a statement. Kerry, who was an early supporter of the NATO mission in Libya, cast Kadafi's death as “a victory for multilateralism and successful coalition-building in defiance of those who derided NATO and predicted a very different outcome.” PHOTOS: Moammar Kadafi | 1942 - 2011 “The United States demonstrated clear-eyed leadership, patience, and foresight by pushing the international community into action after Qaddafi promised a massacre,” he said in a statement.
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NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
Sen. John Kerry, who joined Sen. John McCain earlier this year in supporting the use of force to assist the Libyan rebels, praised the U.S. role in the conflict Thursday as deposed Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi was reported dead. Kadafi's death is a development that “marks the end of his reign of terror and the promise of a new Libya,” the Massachusetts Democrat said in a statement. Kerry, who was an early supporter of the NATO mission in Libya, cast Kadafi's death as “a victory for multilateralism and successful coalition-building in defiance of those who derided NATO and predicted a very different outcome.” PHOTOS: Moammar Kadafi | 1942 - 2011 “The United States demonstrated clear-eyed leadership, patience, and foresight by pushing the international community into action after Qaddafi promised a massacre,” he said in a statement.
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WORLD
April 21, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Misurata, Libya, and Los Angeles -- Barely two months ago, combat photographer Tim Hetherington sent out a tweet from the Academy Awards ceremony, where his Afghanistan war film "Restrepo" was up for the best documentary trophy. "At the #Oscars w/ Josh Fox of @gaslandmovie and director of Wasteland http://ow.ly/i/8Dl6," he messaged, referring to two of his fellow nominees in the category. The tweet was accompanied by a photo of Hetherington, beaming, in a tuxedo. On Tuesday, Hetherington sent out a very different report from the shattered and besieged Libyan city of Misurata: "Indiscriminate shelling by Qaddafi forces.
WORLD
April 21, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Misurata, Libya, and Los Angeles -- Barely two months ago, combat photographer Tim Hetherington sent out a tweet from the Academy Awards ceremony, where his Afghanistan war film "Restrepo" was up for the best documentary trophy. "At the #Oscars w/ Josh Fox of @gaslandmovie and director of Wasteland http://ow.ly/i/8Dl6," he messaged, referring to two of his fellow nominees in the category. The tweet was accompanied by a photo of Hetherington, beaming, in a tuxedo. On Tuesday, Hetherington sent out a very different report from the shattered and besieged Libyan city of Misurata: "Indiscriminate shelling by Qaddafi forces.
WORLD
February 21, 2011 | By Bob Drogin and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Moammar Kadafi's embattled regime unleashed a military assault in the heart of the Libyan capital in an effort to crush a popular protest like those that have already toppled two North African rulers and now threatens the longest-serving leader in the Arab world. Unlike the strongmen who fell to street demonstrations in Tunisia and Egypt, Kadafi all but launched a war against his country's civilian population to maintain control of the oil-rich nation. Libyan state television reported Monday that security forces were storming what it called "dens of terror and sabotage" in the capital, Tripoli.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Republican presidential candidates Rick Perry, Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman Jr. weighed in on the crumbling of the Kadafi regime in Libya.  FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article and its headline incorrectly said that Moammar Kadafi's regime has fallen. Kadafi has not given up power. Rick Perry: "The crumbling of Muammar Ghadafi's reign, a violent, repressive dictatorship with a history of terrorism, is cause for cautious celebration. The lasting impact of events in Libya will depend on ensuring rebel factions form a unified, civil government that guarantees personal freedoms, and builds a new relationship with the West where we are allies instead of adversaries.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2011 | Bloomberg
Crude rose above $110 a barrel for the first time in 30 months as a fire burned at Libya's Sarir oilfield, bolstering concern that unrest in North Africa and the Middle East will spread, curbing shipments. Futures climbed 1.4% after NATO said forces loyal to Muammar Qaddafi caused a fire at the field, according to Al Arabiya television. The conflict in Libya is currently in a stalemate, said Army General Carter Ham, the U.S. commander for Africa. Revolts have led to the overthrow of governments in Egypt and Tunisia and targeted regimes from Syria to Bahrain.
NEWS
September 1, 1985 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
Few people attach more importance to language than does the Arab. To the Arab, his language is more than a way of communicating. It is an object of worship, an almost metaphysical force that draws man closer to God. The Koran is written in Arabic, and the Koran is regarded as the word of God. Muslims believe that every thought, every word man needs is written in the Koran, expressed 13 centuries ago in Allah's revelations to the illiterate merchant Mohammed.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | BILL STEIGERWALD
Week in week out, the New Republic is hard to beat for intelligence, wit and political provocation. Sure, it's liberal and tilted toward Democrats. But editor Michael Kinsley and his gang wrestle with the Big Ideas of the Day without inducing Epstein-Barr syndrome, sacrifice a sacred cow occasionally and are a font of some of the most clever headlines in magazinedom.
WORLD
February 21, 2011 | By Bob Drogin and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Moammar Kadafi's embattled regime unleashed a military assault in the heart of the Libyan capital in an effort to crush a popular protest like those that have already toppled two North African rulers and now threatens the longest-serving leader in the Arab world. Unlike the strongmen who fell to street demonstrations in Tunisia and Egypt, Kadafi all but launched a war against his country's civilian population to maintain control of the oil-rich nation. Libyan state television reported Monday that security forces were storming what it called "dens of terror and sabotage" in the capital, Tripoli.
NEWS
September 27, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forced to choose between his millionaire mom and college sweetheart, the youngest son of Orange County scion Joan Irvine Smith picked love over money earlier this month, marrying a woman his family disapproved of despite threats he would be disowned. It was a choice that could cost him an inheritance of as much as $100 million--but spared him his dignity, Morton Smith said. It also has pitted him against one of Orange County's wealthiest and most visible philanthropists.
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