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Qingdao

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1986
I must take a stand against your article on Qingdao (Tsingtao) China and your labeling of it "Sin City" in 1946. Not only was there no more "sin" there than at Shanghai Red's in San Pedro, or the destroyer base at San Diego, or the Mare Island Base at Vallejo, or the base at Bremerton, Wash., but it was also the home port of the USS Estes, the flagship of our Seventh Fleet, which not only carried a full admiral but also a vice admiral and a brigadier general of the Marines aboard.
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WORLD
July 7, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
QINGDAO, China - As far as Li Lejun is concerned, there's one easy way to make a July beach vacation even better than expected: Add seaweed. Hundreds upon hundreds of tons of it. Buried up to his thighs in sand, his back covered in what looked like strands of chartreuse cotton candy, the 7-year-old Beijing boy was having the time of his life Sunday at No. 1 Bathing Beach in this city 350 miles north of Shanghai. Ten paces to his right, men in swim briefs were using pitchforks to fling mounds of algae into a yellow front-end loader.
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NEWS
October 31, 1986 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
When Gilbert Luna served in the U.S. Navy here in 1946, this port city along the East China coast was known to American servicemen as "the Sin City of the Orient." "Qingdao was high living for Americans. There were private beaches. The girls were lined up waiting right outside the military compound in rickshaws," Luna, 58, who was then a teen-aged seaman just out of boot camp, recalled in a recent telephone interview.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
YUEQING, China - A shipbuilding boom raised the fortunes of this hardscrabble industrial port. Five-star hotels sprouted along with machinery depots and metal shops. European luxury cars darted past heavy trucks on the bustling streets. But in another sign ofChina'seconomic slowdown, shipyards are now closing and half-finished vessels lie rusting in the humid haze. Prosperity is receding like the tide. Thousands of laborers have lost their jobs. Liu Danyin, a compact man with bulging forearms, found so much work in the region's shipyards over the last decade that he built a new home for his family hundreds of miles away in the countryside.
TRAVEL
January 15, 2012 | By Mike Ives, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A few months before the 2008 Beijing Olympics, I read a blog post by an Atlantic Monthly correspondent about Chinese wine. Chinese what? I grew up outside New York City, where I ate hundreds of pounds of lo mein and pork-fried rice but didn't see, taste or hear of Chinese wine. Even when I traveled to China in 2009 and 2010, I saw drinkers mostly tossing back beer and baijiu (Chinese liquor). But Western-style wine is attracting the attention of China'srising middle class.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
YUEQING, China - A shipbuilding boom raised the fortunes of this hardscrabble industrial port. Five-star hotels sprouted along with machinery depots and metal shops. European luxury cars darted past heavy trucks on the bustling streets. But in another sign ofChina'seconomic slowdown, shipyards are now closing and half-finished vessels lie rusting in the humid haze. Prosperity is receding like the tide. Thousands of laborers have lost their jobs. Liu Danyin, a compact man with bulging forearms, found so much work in the region's shipyards over the last decade that he built a new home for his family hundreds of miles away in the countryside.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Born in northern China and raised in Beijing, Sally Liu came of age in the 1990s and dreamed of becoming a filmmaker. With the world's most populous nation swelling with thousands of new cinemas, big-budget productions proliferating and box-office grosses multiplying, the movies in China aren't just glamorous, they're a serious growth industry. When it came time to apply to film school, though, Liu didn't look to China's most prominent institution, the Beijing Film Academy. The competition is fierce — the academy accepts only 500 students each year from among 100,000 applicants, making it about 140 times harder to attend than Harvard University.
WORLD
July 7, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
QINGDAO, China - As far as Li Lejun is concerned, there's one easy way to make a July beach vacation even better than expected: Add seaweed. Hundreds upon hundreds of tons of it. Buried up to his thighs in sand, his back covered in what looked like strands of chartreuse cotton candy, the 7-year-old Beijing boy was having the time of his life Sunday at No. 1 Bathing Beach in this city 350 miles north of Shanghai. Ten paces to his right, men in swim briefs were using pitchforks to fling mounds of algae into a yellow front-end loader.
WORLD
November 24, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. destroyer docked in eastern China today, the first port call in China by a U.S. Navy ship since the two countries curtailed military ties after a dispute over a plane crash last year. Chinese sailors lined the dock as the destroyer Paul F. Foster pulled into Qingdao. A Chinese military band played and a girl held a bouquet in welcome. Military ties were cut back after a Navy spy plane and a Chinese fighter jet collided over the South China Sea in April 2001.
TRAVEL
January 15, 2012 | By Mike Ives, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A few months before the 2008 Beijing Olympics, I read a blog post by an Atlantic Monthly correspondent about Chinese wine. Chinese what? I grew up outside New York City, where I ate hundreds of pounds of lo mein and pork-fried rice but didn't see, taste or hear of Chinese wine. Even when I traveled to China in 2009 and 2010, I saw drinkers mostly tossing back beer and baijiu (Chinese liquor). But Western-style wine is attracting the attention of China'srising middle class.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Born in northern China and raised in Beijing, Sally Liu came of age in the 1990s and dreamed of becoming a filmmaker. With the world's most populous nation swelling with thousands of new cinemas, big-budget productions proliferating and box-office grosses multiplying, the movies in China aren't just glamorous, they're a serious growth industry. When it came time to apply to film school, though, Liu didn't look to China's most prominent institution, the Beijing Film Academy. The competition is fierce — the academy accepts only 500 students each year from among 100,000 applicants, making it about 140 times harder to attend than Harvard University.
TRAVEL
June 29, 2008 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
I had been trying to learn Mandarin at Beijing Language and Culture University and still had about 3,500 Chinese characters to memorize with two months left in the semester. It was going slowly and, often, not well. So, taking a note from American college students, I packed my bathing suit, flip-flops and a mystery novel and came to Qingdao for spring break. Millions of Chinese sun-seekers annually visit Qingdao, the beach capital of northern China.
WORLD
November 24, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. destroyer docked in eastern China today, the first port call in China by a U.S. Navy ship since the two countries curtailed military ties after a dispute over a plane crash last year. Chinese sailors lined the dock as the destroyer Paul F. Foster pulled into Qingdao. A Chinese military band played and a girl held a bouquet in welcome. Military ties were cut back after a Navy spy plane and a Chinese fighter jet collided over the South China Sea in April 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1986
The article on Qingdao brought back memories of the liberty days I had spent there in 1945 when it was known as Tsingtao. The people were very friendly, and the surprise was the quality of the beer, which still is ranked very highly. My ship, the USS Hydrus, had been in the Philippines just prior, and there was hardly any diversity in the entertainment due to the war damages. We also visited Tianjian, then known as Tientsin, but due to the lack of port facilities had to limit liberty to 10% of the Port Watch, I being one of the lucky ones to go. By comparison, Tianjian was a tremendous city, with people from many countries, somehow living then through the war. In 1945, one could hear the sound of remote firing of weapons, which were attributed to fighting between the Nationalists and the Bandits (an expression used in Tianjian for the Communist troops)
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