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Quality Education Project

NEWS
January 13, 1993 | PETER H. KING
Tall and thin, with long arms and a bony, bespectacled face, Bill Honig belongs on a Norman Rockwell canvas--a caricature, say, of a flinty New England schoolmaster, rod in one hand, primer in the other. He was, in fact, a schoolteacher once, and this shows in both his speech and his bearing. Bill Honig doesn't converse; he lectures. He doesn't ask questions; he gives answers. There are those up here who will suggest that these tendencies are what led him into trouble.
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NEWS
January 12, 1993 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening arguments in the felony conflict-of-interest trial of state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig were presented Monday, with prosecutors showing the jury a large chart depicting Honig sitting at a green desk allegedly awarding tainted contracts. "Mr. Honig had a financial interest in the contracts," Chief Assistant Atty. Gen. George Williamson told the seven women and five men on the Superior Court jury. "Nothing more, nothing less."
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys representing school chief Bill Honig in his conflict-of-interest trial sought a recess in the criminal proceedings Wednesday, contending that a Superior Court Judge had cut the heart out of their defense. Judge James L. Long barred Honig from telling a jury that he was acting on behalf of California's schoolchildren when he OKd more than $337,000 in public funds to pay educators who were working for his wife's nonprofit consulting firm.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a year of legal maneuvering and bitter accusations of political persecution, the felony conflict-of-interest trial of state schools chief Bill Honig is to begin Monday in Superior Court. In a rare criminal action against an elected statewide official, the superintendent of public instruction is charged with four counts of conflict of interest in alleged misuse of state funds in connection with the operation of his wife's nonprofit educational consulting firm.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since he was indicted on state felony conflict of interest charges in March, state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig has been blaming his troubles on a "right-wing conspiracy," organized by a "cabal of conservatives." Honig and his supporters said the indictment was engineered by members of the State Board of Education, a few legislators and legislative staff members, and some fundamentalist religious leaders. They believe that this "cabal" pressured Atty. Gen.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig, under state indictment on felony conflict of interest charges, said he does not expect to run for a fourth term. "I haven't finally made a decision but I think it's very unlikely I'd run again," Honig said during a wide-ranging interview with The Times. "You get about as much accomplished as you can get in 12 years," said the schools chief, whose third term will end early in 1995.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former executive director of a parent involvement program run by Nancy Honig, wife of state schools chief Bill Honig, told a state grand jury she was eased out of her job after complaining that the organization and the state Department of Education were too closely intertwined. In testimony made public Monday, Linda Page said she was told that all parental involvement projects sponsored by the department first had to be approved by Nancy Honig's private, nonprofit Quality Education Project.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State schools chief Bill Honig pleaded innocent to four felony conflict-of-interest counts in Superior Court on Monday and afterward again accused state Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren of pursuing the prosecution out of "political motivations." Lungren "is using the criminal justice system to settle political scores," Honig told reporters after the brief arraignment proceedings, "either to advance his career or to pay off his right-wing supporters."
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Appearing calm and relaxed, state schools chief Bill Honig surrendered Friday afternoon at a Sacramento sheriff's office for booking on felony conflict-of-interest charges. A short time later, state Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren broke a three-day silence about the indictment, which was returned by a Sacramento County Grand Jury late Tuesday, and said Honig used public money to pay consultants employed by an enterprise that was run by Honig's wife, Nancy.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State schools chief Bill Honig confirmed Thursday that he has been indicted by a state grand jury on felony conflict-of-interest charges, but he denied any wrongdoing and said he is the victim of a right-wing "cabal" seeking to force him from office.
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